The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Boule bulging either side of the score line

la_anders's picture
la_anders

Boule bulging either side of the score line

Hi, I'm new here - I joined because I read this forum so much and now I have an issue that I can't get to grips with and I hope someone can help! As you can see from the picture my boule is bulging too much either side of my scoring and pinching in the middle. I'm happy with the great amount of oven spring I'm getting but I wish I could get the ear while keeping the boule shape. Recipe/method used is as follows:

400g SWBF, 50g white rye, 10g salt, 100g levain, 325g water (75% hydration)

2 hour autolyse; 7.5 hour bulk ferment (at about 19°C/64.4°F - I'm in the UK it's cold!) with one stretch and fold, one lamination and 4 hourly coil folds; 1 hour pre shape; shape and overnight uncovered banneton proof in fridge for 13 hours

Baked straight from fridge 15 mins @ 230°C/446°F with steam (cast iron baking stone and tray with water), 25 mins at 180°C/374°F no steam

More pictures: https://imgur.com/gallery/VkkUFtr

Thank you!

 

idaveindy's picture
idaveindy

Welcome to TFL ! 

Very good oven spring!  Congratulations. 

The single end-to-end score line works fine for batards (oblong or oval loaves),  but as you see, is not optimum for boules (round loaves).

Most people do a cross/plus/X, or a # sign, or a circle on their boules. And after that, you can get fancy and creative.

Here are some photos for ideas: https://duckduckgo.com/?q=boule+bread+score+scoring+good+oven+spring&t=fpas&iar=images&iax=images&ia=images

I am not so good at making oven spring. Here is one of my better ones: http://www.thefreshloaf.com//files/u151432/AF61C384-AD02-4D6D-934E-B56CBA8F07E0.jpeg

Bon appétit, amigo!

Ilya Flyamer's picture
Ilya Flyamer

I've had boules with pretty good oven spring scored with one cut (not just straight though, more slightly curved and at an angle) where it clearly affected the shape making it slightly longer in one direction, but nowhere near as extreme as this image!

la_anders's picture
la_anders

Thank you very much - I can't believe I got some responses here. There are so many great ideas on the link I will give them a try, also your loaf looks so lovely!

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

dried out in the refrigerator overnight.  Refrigerators are good at dehydrating foods and if the loaf wasn't covered, and then baked, the only way for the dough to expand during the oven spring whould be right there in the score.  And it did pushing the two halves apart.  The skin actually looks a bit firm from here.  Try slipping the banneton into a large bag overnight in the fridge and see if it makes a difference.

Was the skin a bit "leather hard" during scoring?

I'm always looking for another way to make a loaf look like a pumpkin this time of year.  :)

la_anders's picture
la_anders

I will certainly give this a try thank you for responding - I was questioning my choice to leave it uncovered as I wrote this post but I recall reading somewhere that it can make getting the dough out of the banneton easier for beginners and makes the loaf hold its shape a bit more during scoring. However, I don't think it's worth a wonky boule!  In case your curious, when left uncovered in the fridge the skin is dry to the touch and slightly firmer, but not hard. The grignette had no problems scoring it and it tasted great - It's worth a try for a pumpkin loaf, I wish you luck! 

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

setting the banneton in a large cloth and folding the cloth over the dough and then into the fridge on a rack.  Or after wrapping in the cloth, put inside a bag, try a paper bag.  Find out what works for you.