The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Help - Forkish Overnight White

thebreadereater's picture
thebreadereater

Help - Forkish Overnight White

Hello all,

I'm an avid sourdough baker but decided yesterday to make Ken Forkish's overnight white for a change of pace (1000g flour, 690g water, 1/4 tsp yeast, salt).

After a room temp rise of about 1.5 hours with 4 stretch & folds, I put the dough in the fridge overnight. However, it was supposed to go on the counter for 12-14 hours! My bad. I'm completely unfamiliar with how to proceed with yeasted doughs, so I have thus far just left it in the fridge to continue its rise. So, thus far it's been in the fridge for 24 hours and it really hasn't grown in size much (if at all). 

Any suggestions on how to proceed? Typically, my next steps (once the dough triples in size, according to Forkish) would be dividing the dough and letting them proof for about 1 hour shaped, and then into a hot dutch oven. 

Should I leave it in the fridge even longer? Should I take it out tonight and do an overnight rise on the counter as I should have initially (would it also be 12 hours, or shorter than that?). Both? I feel so lost using commercial yeast as I haven't done so in years and would really appreciate all of your input! :) 

Booda's picture
Booda

I like Ken Forkish breads (I only live about 20" away from his bakery), although I've had difficulty with any of his overnight bulk rise breads in the summer, as my house is warmer than his. I generally ignore his estimated times, as they are based on his kitchen temperature of 70℉ during the day, and 65℉ at night. My house is probably in the low 70's at night in the summer, and therefore everything would be over proofed if I left them on the counter. I bake his breads but start the bulk rise in the morning, and they have usually doubled or tripled in volume after about 6 - 8 hours or less, as my kitchen is probably closer to 75℉ during the day. I'd take your dough out of the refrigerator and do your bulk rise during the day. I have the same issue with his doughs, whether they are instant yeast, hybrids, or sourdough. The opposite would be true in the winter, with my daytime and nighttime temperatures lower than his. 

thebreadereater's picture
thebreadereater

My daytime temps are about 71 in my kitchen. So you would suggest taking it out, and doing 6-12 hours of rising until it triples in size, and then proceeding with shaping and another room temp proof? I’m scared that will never happen because of such a long fridge rest. 

Booda's picture
Booda

It doesn't sound like you've had much bulk fermentation. You should be seeing a larger increase in volume, there should be air bubbles on the sides of the container, and the dough should be soft and billowy. I'd let it finish it's bulk rise on the counter, then proceed as per the directions.