The Fresh Loaf

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Help with Tartine loaf

nycone's picture
nycone

Help with Tartine loaf

All,

 I'm a novice baker.  I tried the Tartine Country Loaf and tried to follow directions exactly.  I had trouble with getting the loaf taught at the final folds. 

The crumb is very thick and heavy.

The result is in the photo.  Any advice is welcome

Benito's picture
Benito

Your description of the crumb as thick and heavy sounds like the gummy crumb from an underproofed dough.  

First have a look at your starter, how active is it?  If fed 1:1:1 or 1:2:2 how long does it take to double if the ambient temperature is around 80ºF?

gerryp123's picture
gerryp123

I've made this recipe several times, with result as expected. Directions in text are very complete.  Need to follow carefully with respect to temps and duration. 

This is particularly important during fermentation and folds.  Need dough temp before every fold to be within stated range; need to see a >20% increase at end of fermentation.  If not change proofing temp, extend timing and number of folds accordingly.  

Also applies to starter/levan.  Need stated temp, rise, aroma.

Other factors, but above are most important to solve problem stated.

idaveindy's picture
idaveindy

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nycone's picture
nycone

Yes, it was gummy.  The starter may be the issue.  It doubles in 12 hours in whole wheat flour, but does nothing in bleached flour.  Is this normal?

Benito's picture
Benito

It sounds like your starter might be the issue.  Without a really active starter your levain will be weak and your bread won’t rise.  I’d avoid bleached flour as it may adversely affect the microbes.  At what temperature is your starter growing at when you say it takes 12 hours to double?  As you know temperature has a huge effect on the rate of growth of your starter.

If you feed it your whole wheat flour, at a 1:2:2 ratio and kept it at 80ºF, how long would it take to double.  If it can do this within 3-4 hours your starter is quite active.  We need more information in order to help you.

WatertownNewbie's picture
WatertownNewbie

Perhaps this will help in some way: http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/64305/tartine-basic-country-bread

Happy baking.

Ted

nycone's picture
nycone

After a little research and the comments above, it looks like my starter is weak.  I did my loaf when the leaven floated, but that wasn't enough.  I'm going to start over with a new starter.  Does anyone have a favorite "can't miss" method for making a starter?  I use the pineapple juice method, but I'd take advice.

PrayaDubia's picture
PrayaDubia

I would recommend working on strengthening your current starter rather than starting over. How old is your starter? At what temperature is it kept? (i.e fridge, room temp) What is your feeding regimen? On YouTube, there is a good video by FullProofBaking on strengthening your starter so that it doubles faster or even triples. 

You likely have a good colony of the right microbes but just not enough of them. Starting over will get you right back to where you are now but just take longer. Keeping your starter at warm room temp for a while and feeding it at peak are ways to strengthen it. Good luck!

Benito's picture
Benito

Take a small amount of your starter and create an offshoot. Feed it 1:2:2 and keep it in a warm spot. Feed it when it has peaked again and again 1:2:2 for several days a couple of times a day. Put it in the fridge if you need to. After a few days you’ll see that it is far more vigorous then you can switch back to whatever flour you want.