The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

standard proofing temperatures

Breadifornia's picture
Breadifornia

standard proofing temperatures

Hello, does anybody know if there is a standard proofing temp. and humidity that recipes assume when they give you proofing times? I am able to control temp./hum. with some precision, and wondering what they should be when recipes just say "bulk proof for x hrs."  Thanks in advance! 

dbazuin's picture
dbazuin

Often the say something like room temperature wich is not very exact. 

Best is to choose your own temp and watch the dough and not the clock. 

I al ways ferment on the 30° C. For two reasons one is the flavor and the other it does not get higher then in my kitchen so I am sure it is 30 al the time. 
That way the fermentation time time is predictble. 
Ater that I shape it and put it in the fridge for at least 12 ours.

I must add that I don’t follow recepis but think and calculate them myself. 
When I make a bread type for the first time I search the net for a few recepis to see what the general idear is. 

Maybe try this it is much more fun 😀

Breadifornia's picture
Breadifornia

Thanks! When you say watch the dough, are you going for a % growth or more by the feel of the dough itself (finger poke test)? 

dbazuin's picture
dbazuin

Rise but also the way it moves when you shake It. You only need abot 25% with sourdough when you do a cold retard. 

Breadifornia's picture
Breadifornia

ok thanks! great tip. 

phaz's picture
phaz

I also find the way it moves the best indicator. Think Jello like - right about when it reaches that point is the time to start warming up the oven. Enjoy!

gavinc's picture
gavinc

I set my proofing box at 24C. Hamelman's book recommends 24-25C for optimum fermentation temperature. If you vary this you just have to adjust your schedule.

 

dbazuin's picture
dbazuin

Even with a exact temperature things can vary.
Certainly if you use soure dough.

gavinc's picture
gavinc

Very correct. Experience with dough feel trumps.

Breadifornia's picture
Breadifornia

Thanks! I'll go with this setting as my baseline.  

andykg's picture
andykg

this is an average guide

 

Temperature
Range
Fermentation
Time
Flavor
Outcome
Hot (e.g. Very Hot Sunny Day)82F – 85F (28C – 29C)Short (4 – 6 hours)Base
Sourness
Warm (e.g. Room Temperature)70F – 75F (21C – 24C)Medium (6 – 12 hours)Mild
Cold (e.g. Fridge Temperature)35F – 50F (2C – 10C)Long (12 – 24+ hours)Tangy Sourness
Breadifornia's picture
Breadifornia

Thanks to all, very helpful.  Hoping the proofing box will make things more predictable, and I will play with it for several bakes/recipes to get a sense of things. I've been very happy with results during first months of baking—no real disasters—, but my biggest variable from bake to bake continues to be oven spring.  It goes from "wow!" to "really?" My methods and timing remain steady, so I'm thinking that changes in room temp are the culprits. Usually baking rustic country loaves.