The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Hamelman's Miche, Ponte-a-Calliere with Golden Buffalo flour

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dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Hamelman's Miche, Ponte-a-Calliere with Golden Buffalo flour

Miche, Ponte-a-Calliere


Miche, Ponte-a-Calliere


Miche, Ponte-a-Calliere crumb


Miche, Ponte-a-Calliere crumb

 

I have made Hamelman's Miche, Ponte-a-Calliere several times. It has been one of my favorites. My previous breads have used 100% First Clear flour from King Arthur.

Several other bakers had enthused about Golden Buffalo flour from Heartland Mill, and their description made it sound ideal for this Miche, so that's what I tried for my first baking with this flour.

Golden Buffalo is more coarsely ground than most bread flours, other than pumpernickel. It absorbs lots of water. I followed Hamelman's formula however, resulting in a dryer dough than using First Clear. It was quite tacky, but not really a slack dough.

The crust color is really nice, I think. The crumb, while not as open as it is meant to be, is still nice and the chew is wonderful. It tasted really good 2 hours after baking. I bet it will taste even better today.

 Next time, I'm going for higher hydration and, if I remember, I will make a soaker with at least part of the flour, as suggested by bwraith.

David

Comments

dolfs's picture
dolfs

I see your point about the crust, but it looks good! One of these days I am going to have to tackle this one.


--dolf


See my My Bread Adventures in pictures

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

As Hamelman says, this bread tastes better after at least 12 hours. I had a couple slices for lunch with soup. It tastes more like a whole wheat bread than anything. The flavor of the wheat was more assertive and the sourness less so today. 

I'd encourage you to "tackle" it.

David

holds99's picture
holds99

David,

That's a really nice loaf and the interior is lovely; nice, evenly distributed holes, throughout.  You do great work.  I've got to try that one.

Howard - St. Augustine, FL

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

 I'm a big fan of this bread. It turned out well, even though I didn't water it enough.  

Maybe it's partly the size, but I do love taking those 3+ pound loaves out of the oven.

David

David J. McMurdo-Johnston's picture
David J. McMurd...

Dave, I owned 2 nation wide Pizza rest franchises many years ago. We used Buffalo for over 25 years for our thick crusts. By adding 7.5 % more water and 1.2 % more yeast, We were able to put the COMPLETE mixed Batch in the walk-in coolers, for up to 48 Hrs. .Very inportant to pre cut into "however many ounces" per loaf or buns {portioning}Of which you are going to use. Another note, Try "Firmapan" as opposed to yeast, The FINNISH, GREENLANDERS,etc. use it. My Island up here, off Vancouver Island B.C.Canada is, 90% Finn, and they all use Firmapan .I have found it "fairs" better in cool, damp, very windy locations,as this Island approximates the climate in Finlandia.Therefore "IT" is more forgiving, and a tougher product. Also I have found that a lot of "the down under folks" use it too. You'll have to play with it,as I have found altitude, Baromitric pressure, and humidity, do affect all. I'm a THIRD Engineer on our 465 foot ship,and the crew likes myself to make all the breads,of which my Grand mother taught me, back in the 50's, on a farm in Saskatchewan--- Totally different climate and rules.But FUN to Make it work any where.Have fun Dave- - - -Dave