The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Back to Basics - Why Rise Twice?

ninarosner's picture
ninarosner

Back to Basics - Why Rise Twice?

Hi everyone,

A while back, before I started getting into sourdough baking, a friend of mine shared her "lazy" recipe which essentially involved mixing everything, 1 long bulk rise, and then baking. No second rise/proof.

I've done a bit of research on the topic, and different sources say different things. Most artisan baking websites call for a second proof, but then some websites say this isn't necessary.

Assuming you are only working with enough dough for 1 loaf, so you don't need to divide it, has anyone tried a long bulk ferment and no second proof? What were the results?

DanAyo's picture
DanAyo

Nina, I have no experience with your proposed method but I do have a thought.

It seems one of the big benefits of a second proof (final proof after shaping) is that the dough is shaped into the final form before it enters proofing. This final shaping is an opportunity to give strength and structure to a dough that has completely relaxed during the bulk fermentation.

If you were to shape your dough before the BF with the thought of not handling it again, you can be sure that the dough will be extremely extensible and probably bake up very flat and splayed out.

At least that is my thoughts...

Danny

ninarosner's picture
ninarosner

That makes sense, thanks Dan.

I have seen recipes for extended bulk rise (12-18hrs), then shape, and then a very quick proof just while the oven heats up for an hour. This would presumably solve the shape issue.

I'm kinda curious to try it.

idaveindy's picture
idaveindy

I've often done short proofs where my dough over-fermented during the bulk ferment phase.  No rule says final proofs have to be over-night.  If the bulk ferment develops gluten, CO2, and good flavor, then the final proof just needs to dry out the skin a bit.

idaveindy's picture
idaveindy

I have a friend who does that.  But,

  • She uses a Bosch-style (Wonder brand maybe) mixer, and thoroughly develops gluten during the mix phase.  Whereas, in artisan style, we let nature develop gluten during the bulk ferment, and just help a little with stretch and folds.  the total running time of her mixer is 20minutes. Flour/water/honey, mix 6 minutes, add yeast mix, mix 2 min, add more flour, mix 12 minutes.
  • she uses 2-1/4 teaspoons of instant dry yeast per loaf.  (3 tablespoons per 4 loaf batch.) 
  • she lets it do the one rise in the bread pan.
  • It's a www.chefbrad.com recipe.

So yes, you can shorten things, but you sacrifice flavor.  Either the bulk ferment, or the final proof, or a combination of both, needs to "go long" to get that great flavor.   

Another option is the pre-ferment with biga or poolish to get the flavor, and that can reduce the number of times you go back and revisit the kitchen.

 

ninarosner's picture
ninarosner

Sounds more complicated when you consider her additional steps.