The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Boy am I a sourdough newbie

VonildaBakesBread's picture
VonildaBakesBread

Boy am I a sourdough newbie

So I like how this starter more than doubled in size. But see how there are almost no bubbles? (At least at the top) What do I need to do?

 

 

BaniJP's picture
BaniJP

It might look like there are no bubbles, but that doesn't mean there isn't activity. It more than doubled in size, ,it's super alive! You can dig in with a spoon and then you will find a very holesome (pun intended) gluten network.

Keep going, couldn't be better!

VonildaBakesBread's picture
VonildaBakesBread

It does smell super hole-some, lolol. I'll see about it when I feed tonight. :)

clazar123's picture
clazar123

How many days old? Looks really good. Does it smell yeasty? Careful-not too big a whiff or it can sting!

VonildaBakesBread's picture
VonildaBakesBread

(gently). It definitely smells like Grandma's house. Or a bakery. :) 

 

VonildaBakesBread's picture
VonildaBakesBread

I bought it from the whole-wheat-averse baker across the street a week ago Monday. It did okay or well for a day or two being fed whole wheat, but then started struggling, so I got out the dredges of our unbleached white flour, which made it happier. But I'm concerned at seeing no yeasty bubbles (or small ones) and the fact it shrinks daily before the 24-hour feeding mark. Trying to get it strong and consistent before I bake with half and feed the other half and stick it in the fridge to be fed weekly. It really smells like Grandma's house, though. Miss her!

DanAyo's picture
DanAyo

Vonilda, your feed ratio is described as 1:1:1. The designation is starter:water:flour. You are mixing 100g starter + 100g water + 100g flour and the starter is fed every 24 hours. There is one very important factor missing in your description, and that is the room temperature. I assume it is left out on the counter.

Unless your starter is kept in a very cool environment, 24 hours is way to long between feeding.

As other have stated, the starter looks very active and healthy. You may not see bubbles but they are there. Without gas in your starter it is unable to rise.

 In your image above the starter has collapsed. It is very probable that the bubbles in the top of the starter also collapsed as the starter fell. A receding starter is the best indicator that your starter needs to be refreshed (fed).

Danny

VonildaBakesBread's picture
VonildaBakesBread

THANKS! I didn't know if something was wrong with the starter or with me, lol. I will feed every twelve hours for a couple days until it's strong, then move it to the fridge and feed/bake once a week. Does that make sense?

Floyd1440's picture
Floyd1440

I don’t see any bubbles but look like it’s grown!  What does your starter consist off?

VonildaBakesBread's picture
VonildaBakesBread

Definite growth! :) Thanks! It consists of unbleached white flour (100 g), tap water at room temp (100 g), and 100 g starter. I'm concerned because it has not been doubling since I bought it from the whole-wheat-averse baker across the street a week ago Monday. It was made with white flour, but I was feeding it organic whole wheat flour and only getting maybe 1/3 growth. It was really not good for a couple days. I tried several different things, but it only started acting nicely when I fed it the last of our white flour over the last couple days. It is still sinking each day before I feed it somewhere around the 24-hour mark. Trying to get it strong and consistent before I bake with half and put the other half (fed)  in the fridge to be fed weekly.

 

Floyd1440's picture
Floyd1440

What’s the starter?

VonildaBakesBread's picture
VonildaBakesBread

My friend started the starter herself (has been making/selling sourdough in our community for several years) with white flour and water at 100% hydration. She sold me 100 g of it and I started feeding it that night. I'm not sure what white flour. She orders online, so King Arthur, I believe.

MTloaf's picture
MTloaf

Just don't screw it down tight. Time your feeding and amounts to be near the peak when you are ready to make bread with it. If it doubles it is ready to use but will be at it's best at the peak. Pay attention to the smell as it goes from flour and water smell to a sweet or fruity note and then to a more vinegar odor as it ages and recedes. It is better to stick with one recipe for awhile to get used to it rather than trying a new one everytime. Be patient it will make good bread if you don't rush it. Plan on about 6 or 7 hours at room temperature, starting with the starter being added, to having a loaf ready to bake or put into the fridge to bake the next day.