The Fresh Loaf

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Mixing panettone dough at home

bronc's picture
bronc

Mixing panettone dough at home

What is the best sequence of mixing a panettone dough in a home stand mixer (be it KitchenAid or Kenwood)? All methods start with the starter, flour, and water which you mix for 10-15 min until a smooth dough is formed but after the addition of the enriching ingredients after that is somewhat arbitrary. For the first dough,I've seen some which suggest first adding the sugar and yolks alternating between the two and waiting after each addition for the dough to come together and adding the butter after you have added the sugar and yolks. In others I've seen a recommendation for mixing the yolks and sugar together and adding them like that. A third source recommends first adding the sugar, then the butter, and the yolks in the end. 

The methods for the 2nd dough are similar but all start with the 1st dough and the flour which you knead for 10-15min..

What would be the most efficient way to mix the dough so that you don't risk under or overmixing it in a stand mixer? I've also seen some recipes which recommend that the dough temp shouldn't go above 26C when mixing but at the same time the dough ferments at 28-30*C so this doesn't make much sense?

mwilson's picture
mwilson

There are many ways to do this. I would say the most common was to first dissolve the sugar in the water fully and then add flour, lievito madre before adding yolks and lastly butter.

With Giorilli's I hold back some of the water (~15 of the typical 50%) until then end.

I adjust my mixing style slightly dependent of the formula I am following.

It's helps to remember how each ingredient effects the mixing process. Yolks are sticky and help impart energy from mechanical mixing while butter and water tend to lubricate things and dull the energy input.

In any case it is important to prevent the dough from overheating as this can damage the gluten during mixing. Keeping it under 26C is a good guideline.

bronc's picture
bronc

Thanks. I don't think I've seen anyone mix the sugar with the water but sounds like a neat idea. Won't the sugar prevent gluten formation though? I always thought most of the gluten development happens during the stage where you mix the lievito with the flour and water. As a guideline, for relatively how much time and at what speeds (I think we both have Kenwood Chef mixers) do you mix the first and the second doughs? Thanks!

mwilson's picture
mwilson

In dough, sugar behaves like water and gives fluidity, rheologically speaking. When fully dissolved, sugar takes up about half its weight in water and forms a syrup which is sticky and helps to work out the gluten during mixing. You'll find that a dough ball will form at a much lower hydration if the sugar is first dissolved which is helpful when making Massari's Panettone since it includes approx. 35-38% water.

When mixing I rarely go above speed 2 with my Kenwood.