The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Cuttlefish Ink Swirl - Community Bake

DanAyo's picture
DanAyo

Cuttlefish Ink Swirl - Community Bake

For those that want to take a ride on the “wild side” here is the CuttleFish Ink Swirl. Please use this post for all things related to the Cuttlefish Ink Swirl. All post related to the Basic Open Crumb should be posted to this page. The Basic Open Crumb Sourdough is the main focus for the Community Bake. It requires no special ingredients.

There are 2 spreadsheets below. One details the "Black Dough and the other, the "White Dough". Both doughs are mixed at the same time and then they are laminated together in order to obtain the swirl affect in the crumb.


The instructions are listed on the spreadsheets. Don't hesitate to ask questions, if clarification is needed. 

This one is a blast? Slicing into it for the first time "is like a box of chocolates, you never know what your going to get". 
Run Forest, ruuun...


 

 

 

DanAyo's picture
DanAyo

These 2 post were moved from the Basic Open Crumb SD page to avoid confusion. It was decided that two separate pages would avoid confusion.

From MarieAnn
 Not only am I not an expert, but I'm about as new at this as one can be - however -

Since I recklessly asked for the Cuddlefish intructions, I'm going to give it a go. Yikes!
I do have a few questions:
1. Are there any directions for layering the two laminations? I'm trying to imagine doing the black dough lamination on a pastry sheet, then trying to turn it over onto the white bread lamination.  Or do you simply lift the entire black lamination up by hand and transfer it?
2. I'm puzzled about how to apply (spread on) the roasted garlic. It seems like this would be chopped up roasted garlic that I would evenly drop on to the bottom (white) laminate. ??
I plan to make this on Saturday and bake on Sunday, if all goes well.  Even if it's a total disaster, it will be fun. 

From DanAyo -
MarieAnn, see this video. Lamination starts at 15:05. 

After roasting the garlic it was chopped and turned into a paste. Spread this on one layer before putting the other layer on top.

 

DanAyo's picture
DanAyo

Here is my first attempt at the Cuttlefish Ink Swirl. The external loaf needs works, but the crumb was fantastic! The flavor is also special. Kristen’s instructions were followed precisely.

The spreadsheet shows that I doubled the percentage of roasted garlic. Garlic is a favorite here and even at that percentage the flavor was not very noticeable. Next time the oven roasting may be shortened in hopes of keeping more of the garlic’s pungency. Maybe it was over roasted.

   

   

   

   

This bake was a lot of fun.

Danny

MarieAnn's picture
MarieAnn

Thanks for the answers, Dan.
The lamination combination method makes sense. 
As for the garlic spread, that contains oil, right? I just don't want to introduce oil to this recipe if it's going to mess it up. 
Your bread looks so wonderful!  This is a great Halloween-looking bread. 

DanAyo's picture
DanAyo

Just a small amount of oil that was used during the garlic roasting process. I don’t think it needs to be calculated.

The flavor of the Rosemary is very noticeable and nice.

Black and orange would also be good for Halloween! Kristen actually makes orange colored bread. I think she uses turmeric, but not sure.

Since I have the Cuttlefish Ink, there are plans to make black pasta soon.

Oh, MarieAnn. If you don’t mind please go to the BOCSD page and delete the contents of your post so as to avoid confusion. Floyd was asked to delete both of our post, but it may take a while.

Thanks 

Danny

MarieAnn's picture
MarieAnn

I deleted the contents. It seems that I couldn't delete the entire entry. 
You are being so helpful. I hope this comes out at least pretty good, because I love the idea of adding other ingredients to my SD breads in the future.  


idaveindy's picture
idaveindy

Dan, you gave me a flashback to this video about Unicorn Poop Cookies:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vrq8v9ijPs4

It uses gel/paste food coloring.

A little pumpkin puree and pumpkin spice might be nice for an orange and black bread.

fullproofbaking's picture
fullproofbaking

I use a touch of oil on the garlic before roasting - then just wrap up in foil and bake at 400degF for about 45 minutes. But you can roast using your favorite method. The tiny bit of oil will end up giving the final loaf a very nice texture (makes it super easy to slice!).

Love this idea to pair the turmeric with the squid ink, Dan! Sounds like it could be a flavorful combo. Your ink pasta sounds delicious too...

MarieAnn's picture
MarieAnn

Dan, after the lamination the instructions say, "2 S&F".  Is this done the same as the coil folds?  
Also, do I need to adjust my cooking time any due to the smaller size of this dough? I bake mine in a cast iron dutch oven.

fullproofbaking's picture
fullproofbaking

Yes you are right - this is the same as a coil fold. I will generally do 2-3 coil folds, depending on whether the dough needs more strengthening throughout the bulk. For smaller loaves, I keep the bake pretty much the same (the dough is fairly high hydration, so I want to bake out all that water) - though you will want to watch the dough towards the end of the bake to be sure it's not over-browning. A quick tap on the bottom will let you know that it's done (if it sounds hollow). :)

MarieAnn's picture
MarieAnn

Since I've made your regular open crumb dough three times (and those are my only experiences with SD) I was wondering about these instructions only calling for two coil folds. Glad to hear there's some flexibility.  I think I'm already a little bit tuned in to how it should feel and look by the 2nd and 3rd coils. I'm also mindful of the temperatures. 
Good to know the bake times should remain about the same.
My autolyse should begin in about 1/2 hour, so I'm off and running!  

fullproofbaking's picture
fullproofbaking

Exciting! Can't wait to see how things go :)

fullproofbaking's picture
fullproofbaking

Exciting! Can't wait to see how things go :)

MarieAnn's picture
MarieAnn

This was fun!  I have learned a lot from this experience, so thank you, Kristin. 
I started the process Saturday at about 11:30 a.m., and here are a few pictures along the way.
#1, The White Lamination with Rosemary and Garlic

#2 Black Lamination added and stretched
Black on White Laminations

#3 Foled Layers
Folded Layers

#4 It's Black Bread!
Black Bread

#5 A small but beautiful loaf
Cuddlefish and Rosemary

#6 The Inside is so cool
The Crumb

DanAyo's picture
DanAyo

Fantastic, MarieAnn! Your are right. It is a lot of fun. I plan to make pasta with the squid ink, also.

Did you find the garlic flavor came through? How did you like the flavor?

The black and white swirl is a show stopper.

Danny

MarieAnn's picture
MarieAnn

Okay, since you asked...
For me, the flavor was not the strong suit of this bread, It was good for sure, and to prove it, the bread is already half eaten (by just myself and my husband). I even had increased the garlic to 15 grams based on your comments. I must confess, due to years of smoking when I was younger, my taste buds aren't excellent, so there's that. But, the pure challenge of producing this baby made it so worthwhile. Now I've experienced the texture of this slightly different dough and felt like it more closely matched Kristen's pictures of her dough - not sure of the right words, stronger, more stretchy? I'm gaining confidence. 
I do have a question:  How much difference does it make on a dough to be using a young starter vs. a more mature one? The one I'm using was created four weeks ago.

DanAyo's picture
DanAyo

I honestly stand amazed! Really!

I remembered a post you wrote a few days ago. Here is a copied portion of it. “ I am a brand new sourdough bread baker. Like Kristin, I also started with an Amish White Bread which inspired my journey (for me this was about six weeks ago). After struggling with my own starter for several weeks, I found this forum and learned enough to get it back on track. From there, I found the link to Kristen's Open Crumb recipe which I have used to bake my first SD loaves.  In fact, I just took my third loaf (boule?) out of the oven 10 minutes ago - all three from Kristen's recipe. I consider them all successes!”

Many of the bakers on this site have baked for years, even decades. I’ve been at it over 20 years. For an experienced baker, your bread would be considered outstanding! The success you’ve obtained in such a short time is nothing short of phenomenal. Absolutely Outstanding!

From the looks of your bread, it is evident that your starter is mature.

Danny

fullproofbaking's picture
fullproofbaking

Am I reading correctly that you are a new sourdough baker? WOW! This is an incredibly beautiful bake - what a great fermentation as well as marbling effect you got! I love these marbled/swirled doughs so much for the technical challenge :)

Like Dan mentioned, your starter is apparently very strong! When I talk about young and mature starters, I usually am referring to how long I've let the levain build. My starter is a few years old, but I only ever use it as a "young levain" - meaning I mix it in the early morning and let it activate/rise in the jar until it's not quite fully hit peak. Just a point of clarification that I know others have asked me about.

Benito's picture
Benito

Wow MarieAnn, your bread is amazing!  The marbling inside looks beautiful.  You have learned so quickly to bake sourdough, congratulations.

Benny

MarieAnn's picture
MarieAnn

Y'all are making my day!  The only reason at all that I'm having the degree of success I'm having with my sourdoughs is because of Kristin's outstanding teaching.

Kristin, I am so appreciative of the time, thought, and effort you've put into your videos. You made each one a professional teaching tool, and I bet I've watched the Basic Open Crumb video 30 times. Plus, I pretty much transcribed your words to paper as a guide. I know I could have downloaded the pdf, but I learned a long time ago how to get info to stick in my brain - pay attention, write it down, and then explain it to someone else. I'm also grateful to my husband who has been supportive. He's helping me to gather the necessary cooking equipment on our limited budget, and he lifts the hot cast iron pot in and out of the oven, along with encouraging me with compliments.

I did get that you were referring to your Levain when you used the word young. I didn't know how to distinguish that from my question, which was about my starter. So at one month, my starter should be considered mature? I actually have two starters (both started around the 23rd of September).  My favorite one, Annabelle, is fed 40% bread flour, 40% whole wheat, and 20% rye. Kristin, I have studied your feeding suggestions and that has helped me tremendously.

Oh, one more thing. Danny, I did the full hydration without holding any water back.  That works well for me, so far.


 

 

syros's picture
syros

Marie Ann - I can’t believe you are new at this. I’ve been baking for a couple of years and I wouldn’t have attempted the Cuttlefish bread! Lovely! 

As to the starter, not sure a month old is considered mature, but if it works, that’s all that matters. It took me almost 2 months and a ton of flour before I got mine working. Now, even if it’s neglected in the fridge, it still gets woken up. Thankfully!

Congrats on your beautiful bake. 

Sharon

Crumbsandcraft's picture
Crumbsandcraft

@Danayo I would love these Excel files to work with, I read somewhere that you can send them. I am a new user so I am not sure how I can send you an email to request the files?

 

Thanks!

DanAyo's picture
DanAyo

Use THIS LINK to send me your email address. I’ll send you both breads if you want.

Danny

Crumbsandcraft's picture
Crumbsandcraft

 Can't get access to the link you send me...