The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Croissants without butter

AnnaZ's picture
AnnaZ

Croissants without butter

This summer I was in a little bakery in Wyoming and purchased a 4-pack of croissants.  They were flaky,tender, and the best I've ever had.  The ingredient list had shortening, not butter.  I tried to research a "butter-less" croissant, but Chef Google did not come up with anything.  I did find a product called "roll-in shortening" but the website where I found it required a 50 pound purchase.  Ummmm........don't think so.  Can I use plain old shortening?  Does it take a special kind?  Should I just forget it and dream of the sublime croissant of Wyoming??   LOL

ds99303's picture
ds99303

If those butterless croisssants were the best you've ever had, then you haven't had good croissants.  Many bakeries are switching to bakers' margarine because it's easier to work with and makes flakier croissants and pastries.  These bakeries have chosen to choose appearance over taste.  Nothing can match the taste of real butter.  The smell of the artificial stuff makes my throat scratchy.  So I looked up bakers' margarine and could only find it in 50lb. blocks.  So maybe try store-bought margarine.  The first time I ever made croissants though it  was with margarine.  That was 40 years ago and I was very young.  They didn't turn out.  The margarine in the croissants melted before the dough could absorb it and it leaked out on to the baking pan and then on to the bottom of the oven.  When I say it leaked out, I don't mean just a little.  It all leaked out.  As I think back, I was probably using a "buttery spread" and not a true margarine.  Technically margarine is suppose to have the same fat/water ratio as butter.  Real margarine might work but I've never tried it.

AnnaZ's picture
AnnaZ

Well, I guess I will not pursue shortening croissants.  When I decide to make them I'll use butter.

breadman1015's picture
breadman1015

About 60 years ago, I worked in a kosher bakery that used a Fleishman's product that was called "Puff Paste" Shortening instead of Butter for both croissants and their puff paste. I assume that a similar product is still available.

julie99nl's picture
julie99nl

Margarine is frequently used for croissant.