The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Seeded Sourdough

ifs201's picture
ifs201

Seeded Sourdough

I had never used a recipe from The Perfect Loaf before, so I decided to try the beginner sourdough recipe. Not being able to help myself, I decided to add 16% seeds (poppy, sesame, sunflower, and pumpkin). This recipe was 78% hydration and only 7.5% starter inoculation. 

My loaves last weekend came it well, but different from what I expected in terms of crumb. It turns out it was because I bought locally milled half-white, also know as T85, flour and didn't fully understand its properties. My loaves were 80% T85 and 20% whole wheat, which resulted in a very high whole grain percentage. For these loaves I decided to try 48% BF, 48% T85, and 4% rye. 

 

Day 19:00 AMMix levain (5-6 hours) 
 4:00 PMAutolyse 
 4:45 PMAdd levain and mix 4 min using Trevor Wilson 
 5:00 PMAdd salt and extra water and mix 4 min 
 5:30 PMStart Coil Fold on counter 
 6:00 PMLamination on counter and add seeds 
 6:30 PMCoil fold 3x 30 min apart doing last one at about 7:30pm 
 8:50 PMDivide and pre-shape 
 89Shape 
 9:30 PMInto fridge 
Day 27:10 AMBake 
    

Comments

not.a.crumb.left's picture
not.a.crumb.left

and I bet they will taste even better!

Is it just me or do I see a pair of eyes with some black eyelashes! :D Kat

ifs201's picture
ifs201

I like scoring on the side because it reminds me of Pacman! 

Benito's picture
Benito

Your loaves look amazing!  I really learned a lot by baking Maurizio's recipes as a newbie because I didn't have a good grasp on planning a bake with sourdough.  I really like how he gives an idea of when to start things so that they can come together to bake much later on.  He helped me learn more about judging fermentation, although I didn't do a great job with my last bake.  It looks like you did a fabulous job with his beginner's sourdough and even modified his recipe!  

Benny

ifs201's picture
ifs201

The 7.5% inoculation was probably the smallest I've used. I'm excited to try some of his other recipes. As you said, he does a great job explaining the process.

Our Crumb's picture
Our Crumb

That is some kinda bloom ya got there.  Nice!  Your grin should mirror that of your loaves!

t

Filomatic's picture
Filomatic

Dying to see the crumb on those beauties ...

ifs201's picture
ifs201

ifs201's picture
ifs201

Bread1965's picture
Bread1965

You made a great looking loaf and should be quite happy.

Dough structure is an important element to achieving an open crumb and avoiding dense spots. Stretch and folds are great too and have their place. But I'd encourage you to try the same loaf but use coil folds next time. https://www.instagram.com/p/Bju7aazn27T/?hl=en 

It could also be from how you shaped your boules, but given the oven rise it looks like you did a fine job there..

Let me know if you notice a difference using coil folds.. good luck!

 

ifs201's picture
ifs201

I actually did use coil folds! I really liked it and felt it created more strength than stretch and folds, but alas no real difference in the crumb! I had been using slap and fold for mixing, but recently started using the Trevor Wilson method. Next time maybe I'll try slap and fold for mixing followed by coil folds. 

I keep wondering if I'm deflating the dough during shaping. Also I use bowls instead of bannetons and wonder if that has an impact.

Filomatic's picture
Filomatic

I've been told that the denser middle part is typical of a cold final rise.  I'm sure there's a good explanation for why that would be.  Trevor's Open Crumb Mastery e-book is for you.  He is very attuned to the difficulties bakers face.  Meanwhile, beautiful work.

ifs201's picture
ifs201

I'd read that elsewhere too. So many variables!

Filomatic's picture
Filomatic

I'm going to try the coil folds at least for fun.  But I'm willing to sacrifice openness for the benefits of cold retarding, especially easier scoring.

Elsie_iu's picture
Elsie_iu

Could it have been slightly under-proofed? I get this kind of elongated holes at the top whenever the dough isn't fully fermented. I doubt if it's attributed to gluten development... Under-developed white dough can still have a pretty open crumb. I have made a few minimally worked 70% white loaves (with/without porridge). Despite their poor structure, the crumb wasn't half bad. 

ifs201's picture
ifs201

I'll try pushing the bulk ferment a bit more next time to see what happens.

Hotbake's picture
Hotbake

The 2 loaves together really looks like Garfield's eyes🤣

The crumb looks fine to me, as long as nice and even it's a good loaf.

I'd like to add besides low percentage of whole grain, small loaves tend to hold bigger bubbles then big loaves. The kind of Instagram worthy wild open crumb bread are usually way smaller(as small as <500g)way lighter to achieve that kind of effects.

Benito's picture
Benito

The crumb looks great to me, good job. 

MichaelH's picture
MichaelH

In spite of the kibitzers I don't think loaves that are not permeated with cavernous holes are substandard. I can achieve that type if I choose to, but seldom try. I don't like the butter or other spread all ever my hands and my lap.

You did well.

ifs201's picture
ifs201

I've found that my crumb is more open on the sides of the loaf than in the center. I'm wondering if this is a result of shaping or baking straight out of a cold fridge.