The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Sourdough or yeasted?

Ivankcy's picture
Ivankcy

Sourdough or yeasted?

Hello!

i have been trying to make croissant for the pass few weeks. 

Came along 2 different type of croissant recipe. 

One use yeast and another one use sourdough starter

May I ask do anyone know what is the real difference between this two method? Other than time consuming. 

Ford's picture
Ford

It's a matter of taste.  Your choice.

Ford

albacore's picture
albacore

Keep it simple and use yeast. Croissants are tricky enough without adding the complexity of sourdough.

You can make excellent croissants with yeast; once you've got to that stage, by all means investigate the sourdough versions.

Lance

ds99303's picture
ds99303

I always use yeast.  I don't like sourdough.  When I make croissants, after I do all the turns, I wrap the dough in plastic wrap and refrigerate it for about 9 to 10 hours.  This gives the dough a chance to properly ferment and develop flavor.  Without that important step, you end up with croissants that taste like buttered toast rather than croissants, albeit very good buttered toast.  If you unwrap the dough and just smell flour, then the dough hasn't fermented enough.  If you unwrap the dough and smell beer, then it's gone too far.  Even after baking them , you'll still taste the alcohol.  If you unwrap the dough and smell a pleasant aroma that smells sweet with a buttery, yeasty smell, then you're ready to start shaping your croissants. 

Ivankcy's picture
Ivankcy

thank you so much!

all these small tips really helps me a lot. 

 

ds99303's picture
ds99303

The tip about not wanting them to smell like beer applies to the final proof as well.  With the recipe I use, I find 4 to 4 1/2 hours of proofing at room temperature is sufficient.  That's with taking the dough out of the refrigerator and rolling out and forming the croissants as quickly as possible,  The dough is cold at this point and with all the cold butter in it, it takes a good hour or two just for the dough to come up to room temperature.  One time I had to leave and didn't get back until almost six hours later,  That was too long.  They weren't horrible but I did end up throwing some of them away.  Just remember, the proofing times I use apply to my situation based on the recipe I use and the temperature inside my house.  Your situation may or may not be the same.