The Fresh Loaf

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The best way to inject filling?

BreadLee's picture
BreadLee

The best way to inject filling?

I have a little french bread dough ball.  Kinda like a hush puppy.  I placed a date puree filling on the dough, then rolled it into a ball.  The problem is there's not near enough filling to bread ratio.  

I'm thinking I could do better by injecting the finished roll.  Have any of you done this? If so, what worked best? Thanks! 

David R's picture
David R

I have not done it myself, but pictures of it being done by various people in various places are pretty much unanimous: a syringe with any kind of tip big enough for the jelly to flow through. The type of needle syringe sold for basting turkeys looks like it would work fine (the type with a thumb-operated plunger, not a squeeze bulb). It appears not to matter if the nozzle end is plastic or metal, as long as it isn't too narrow to get the jelly through it.

BreadLee's picture
BreadLee

That's exactly what I was thinking after googling a bit. The stainless steel injector tips are my main concern.  I'll be pureeing the filling pretty smoothly and think it would work. 

I'll give it a shot! Haha! I amuse myself.  

Thanks dude! 

BreadLee's picture
BreadLee

David, I'm going to go with this one.  Looks like it's made for thick liquids and purees. I'll just need a little device to hollow it out a little.  I think ive seen them.  

Ofargo Stainless Steel Meat Injector Syringe with 3 Marinade Injector Needles for BBQ Grill Smoker, 2-oz Large Capacity, Including Paper User Manual, Recipe E-Book (Download PDF) https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0774X624F/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_i_2clcDb77KFJ0E

ds99303's picture
ds99303

Hollowing it out shouldn't be necessary unless your rolls are extremely dense.  Doughnuts aren't hollowed out before jelly or cream filling is injected into them.

BreadLee's picture
BreadLee

Ok thanks! It's not very dense.  Pretty fluffy texture

BreadLee's picture
BreadLee

I'm thinking I need a tool similar to the one he's using at the beginning of this video.  He's hollowing out those balls. What is that thing called? 

https://youtu.be/j09PBq3KvCs

BreadLee's picture
BreadLee

After some research, I've figured out that I'm mimicking a croquembouche dessert, but it's more of a bread with date filling. That helps with things.  

Xelanon's picture
Xelanon

The most common method would be placing the filling in a piping bag and piping the filling in through the bottom of the bread. 

If you’re working with fillings (like raisins), you may want to add it into the dough before doing stretch and folds to work it in. 

FYI, there are also some who laminate the dough (similar to croissants) 

BreadLee's picture
BreadLee

This will be a smoothly processed puree. I'm going to try a syringe first I believe.  I was thinking piping bag, but asi may be making lots of these things, it may be more tedious with a bag.  We'll see. 

Thank you for the tips!

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

squeeze bottle.  One with a simple screw on top and transparent.  Works a charm!  I also use it for squeezing on jam fillings for cookies.  

https://www.grainger.com/product/CRESTWARE-Squeeze-Bottle-21D964

Then there is this baby!

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=XkaH-aWhfFY

This is more fun to watch and more versatile, depends on your needs...

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=J9sXBz9fKRA

BreadLee's picture
BreadLee

Thanks mini! 

BreadLee's picture
BreadLee

Thanks again mini.  I found the clear bottle at my restaurant equipment store. Bought a 2.50 stainless steel bottle spout to poke thru the crusty bread.  Worked like a champ.  Thanks so much! 

David R's picture
David R

If you don't need precise measurements for each little piece, and can get by with "that's about enough", then the piping bag (with a small enough nozzle) or ketchup squeezer work. Syringes with markings would only really be needed when you want to repeat exactly the same little amount each time.

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

A trick I've used in filling fruit dumplings is to freeze the pitted fruit until firm and when needed, wrap the dough around it.  Is it possible to freeze or chill the filling before sealing in dough?  This might make it easier to handle and stay where you want it inside the "puppy."  Due to the high sugar content, freezing the filling and using a mellon ball scoop or tiny ice cream scoop to shape filling might also work.