The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Pain Fendu Surprise Result!

not.a.crumb.left's picture
not.a.crumb.left

Pain Fendu Surprise Result!

I saw this beautiful image of a Pain Fendu from a very inspired baker http://picdeer.com/media/2004093069051294434_3455206222 and this was the over ambitious and a bit impromptu attempt to recreate something similar.

I basically mixed a  80% Champlain and rolled it out in the middle, degassing the dough quite a bit and then with the split at the bottom put it into a banneton. 

Sadly both versions stuck together again (although the 'split' was floured with rye flour) and did not quite open the way I was hoping for...one looking more like a ciabatta and the other just ripped partly open...

BUT what I could not believe was how little the crumb was affected by the severe degassing of the dough? In fact, it seems that the degassing contributed to even a nicer distribution of the bubbles, I wonder?

If anyone has any good ideas for shaping a Pain Fendu, then please let me know. I did a search here any other tips are happily received...

Kat

 

Comments

syros's picture
syros

Kat, you’re amazing. Your breads are always fantastic. Don’t know how you do it. I see you’ve been a busy girl!

 

hreik's picture
hreik

how busy she is.  Yikes

hester

not.a.crumb.left's picture
not.a.crumb.left

not busy and lucky to have time for baking! Kat

not.a.crumb.left's picture
not.a.crumb.left

and baking reminds me a bit like having little children around (although a while more me now as I have a teenager) ......they keep you on the go while you try to get on with other things! ha, ha...  Kat

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

The crumb is just fabulous.

I haven't made a fendu for years! My recollection is that you have to make the groove with a fairly broad rolling pin and make it deep, leaving just a very thin layer of dough joining the two parts of the loaf.  I think you proof the loaf seam-side up (grooved-side down) ... Let me check ... Yes. If you have Hamelman's "Bread," he has a very good description of the technique, with illustrations. Pp 77-78 in the 2nd edition.

David

not.a.crumb.left's picture
not.a.crumb.left

and I followed more or less the process that Hamelman describes. However,  maybe my rolling pin or rather my spoon  was not thick enough and the joint between the loaves possibly too thin so that they stuck together again during the long cold retard over night? I was also wondering whether the hydration plays a role here too. 

I just mixed a lower hydration Champlain again and will try again....with a wider gap this time. All trial and error....

Kat

Danni3ll3's picture
Danni3ll3

Look at that crumb! That is just to die for! Amazing!

not.a.crumb.left's picture
not.a.crumb.left

but did I care! Thank you Danni and it really makes me think about shaping and readjusting those 'bubbles' as we do it...So a certain pressure seems to be needed especially if you wish to have a regular crumb rather than irregular...Got me thinking... Kat

Bread1965's picture
Bread1965

That looks very much like some 'open crumb mastery'.. well done!

not.a.crumb.left's picture
not.a.crumb.left

and thank you...Trevor knows what he is doing and 'folds with intention' whereas I fold and see what I get and sometimes I am lucky!  Kat