The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

SF style Sourdough inspired by (DMSnyder)

not.a.crumb.left's picture
not.a.crumb.left

SF style Sourdough inspired by (DMSnyder)

This is my attempt as David's lovely formula and I am glad that today a friend who has often been to San Francisco sampled the bread for me and said that indeed it reminds him of San Francisco on a sunny day in the UK! He very gladly took also a loaf home with him too....

I tried to follow David's process a closely as I could and just had to make a number of changes. One that I handmixed the dough and also as there was no target temperature but David mentioned that he put the dough into the proofer at 80F...I actually mixed the dough and aimed for 28C...

The starter was also very new to me as a 'firmer' version and when it looked like this I thought it must be ready after nourishing it for a week like described by David.

I handmixed after 2 hours AL and also held 16g water back in order to mix the stiffer starter in easier. I then waited for 30min and added the salt. I then completed a number of slap and folds until the dough had nicely developed. 

I bulked and followed folding as per David's instruction. After 3 hours the dough had risen, to approx. 50% and was nice and bouncy.

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30 min bench rest and then final shaping cinching and another one I tried more the J. Hamelman oblong shaping which ends with a longer batard. I should have weighted them as one was too big for the banneton although a 1kg one and the dough was 1.2kg...

This is where I was nervous about David's instruction and to let the dough proof at room temp for 2 hours or more as my wine cooler is not the coldest...so I gave it 1 hour and the dough had grown although not the 50% as indicated by David. 

I baked after 15 hours in 4C wine cooler...

The crumb is nice and lacy and great sandwich bread. The taste is indeed more sour than my usual bread. Not shockingly more sour but different.....I never had SF sourdough so I cannot comment myself but I liked the taste!

If I were to bake again, I probably would judge the size of banneton more carefully so that I  let the proof go on a bit longer before going into the wine cooler.

Thank you David......

Comments

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

For your interest, in the commercial bakeries with which I am familiar, doughs or loaves that are cold retarded are kept at 50ºF/10ºC. So, your wine cooler is actually more appropriate than my refrigerator. However, my refrigerator at 40ºF/4ºC will pretty much stop fermentation once the dough equilibrates to the ambient temperature. Your dough will continue fermenting, just more slowly. Since you mentioned Hamelman, I assume you have "Bread." When he prescribes 8-12 hours retardation, I am pretty sure he is talking about 50º not 40ºF.

I'm happy this worked so well for you.

David

not.a.crumb.left's picture
not.a.crumb.left

and I did not want to let you down!

Just out of interest..how much do you let your dough rise during bulk? I have a tendency to let it go quite far which then means that I need to 

give it a bit less time before it goes into the wine cooler as otherwise at risk to overproof in fridge and I had my fair share of those! 

It was also a new experience as I was not sure what type of crumb to expect at all... Kat

 

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

It depends on the dough. Lower hydration doughs rise higher. I guess they have greater structural integrity to support the rise. I go more by the feel of the dough. I feel for fluffiness/puffiness that tells me the dough is well-aerated.

For a 75-78% hydration dough, I suppose the increase in volume is more like 50% than double. For a 50-68% hydration dough, doubling in volume is expected.

David

not.a.crumb.left's picture
not.a.crumb.left

and thank you.  I shall pay a little more attention around bulk rise and hydration and the relation between the two....... I have markers on my bulk container just as a guidance but also try to go with the signs of the dough...

Kat

syros's picture
syros

Ok, can’t say enough. David has started a baking frenzy here! I was too lazy to feed the starter for a week! But now I might have to!

not.a.crumb.left's picture
not.a.crumb.left

this is a lovely bread and after the Sesame seed Kamut loaf success you can now start building the starter for this one! 😂Kat