The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

50+% Whole Spelt SD

mwilson's picture
mwilson

50+% Whole Spelt SD

The aroma is unbelievable!

Made with Stoates (Whole Spelt) and Marriage's (Superfines) Flour, tap water (pH 7.8) and sea salt. 

Refresh (aka levain) 4 hrs @ 30C
50g LM (from bath)
50g Stoates Whole SPelt
15g water
= very firm 45% est. hydration.

400g flour (50% Spelt, 50% white)
111g LM as above
280g water
9.5g salt
10g olive oil

Bulk 2hrs @ 28C

Shaped, not moulded/freestanding and proved until triple (proper triple!) 5hrs@ 27C.

Update:

A few more pictures including crumb.

Comments

Danni3ll3's picture
Danni3ll3

Crumb shot?

mwilson's picture
mwilson

Still cooling, still cracking! I will update...

mwilson's picture
mwilson

It's an even crumb as expected but open (light / very low density) and super soft.

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

A triple is special too, especially with spelt for more than half the flour.  I'm guessing one will be really tasty and open too!  Well done and happy baking

mwilson's picture
mwilson

Cheers dab. Triple is standard operating procedure for all my bakes!

 

Our Crumb's picture
Our Crumb

You must be getting timid in your advancing age, Michael.  I remember that 100% spelt loaf you posted long ago like it was yesterday, and I still can't believe you pulled that off so successfully.  This one's just as pretty.  Well, prettier actually, even without the obligatory crumb shot. 

Spelt.  Haven't been there in ages except to feed my starter.  Tempting.

Nice one.

Tom

mwilson's picture
mwilson

I think you'll find that was 100% white spelt.

Thanks for your kind words.

Cheers,

Michael

Cedarmountain's picture
Cedarmountain

Your bread is beautiful!  The oven rise and spring is impressive - the loaves have the shape of a nuclear submarine with a lovely crackly inviting crust, waiting for you to cut into one and tell us how it tastes.  Well done!

mwilson's picture
mwilson

I've cut it and tried some. It's super soft, very light and without sourness as intended. Wheaty, flavoursome and toasts nicely. There's a few more pictures now added.

Thanks for your comments.

Cheers,

Michael

not.a.crumb.left's picture
not.a.crumb.left

imagine the taste...Amazing! Can't wait to see what the crumb looks like...

Can you bear with me for a question about your starter and levain build...  and sorry if I miss the obvious? I am about to venture on having a stiff and liquid starter and compare how the use of those affect the oven spring in balance with extensibility/hydration etc. I very much liked the link with the Didier Rosada comments that you posted at the time.

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/54900/functional-effect-biga-vs-poolish

Refresh (aka levain) 4 hrs @ 30C
50g LM (from bath)   - 

50g Stoates Whole SPelt

15g water
= very firm 45% est. hydration.

How do you think this bake would have been different, if you were to have chosen not such a stiff levain but a liquid one? Would it have less strength especially with the spelt and instead of going up would have spread?

I read through the many posts about the difference between starters with the science (and that is important of course for the learning) but my brain seems to be much better in learning when I actually relate is to a bread and how the outcome would have been different...  Kat

mwilson's picture
mwilson

LM = Lievito Madre and the "50g (from bath)" is an unknown hydration. My LM which is an all-white (bread flour) 45% hydration dough was sliced and bathed in water for 15 minutes before being wrung out. During this soaking water is absorbed. What was 45% hydration is now 70-80% or so. To this 50g of spelt was added and only 15g water was required to bring it together. I estimated it to be around 45% hydration based on feel alone.

While the underlying principles are the same that discussion is relevant to those pre-ferments which are commercial yeast leavened and not sourdough.

I use a stiff starter because I like to make high volume/low density breads that aren't characteristic of typical sourdough but utilise natural leavening. A wet style isn't conducive to this aim.

Your question isn't that simple because it's not that black and white. A stiff starter is one that is maintained that way and is not the same as a stiff levain. If I were to make a wet levain with my firm starter the acidity development would go crazy. I'd get a very lactic starter that would cause issues with dough development and create a very gelatinous crumb which I don't like.

Indeed I would expect more spread, less height and less spring with a wet starter.

EDIT:

Lievito Madre (Storage) - 45% hydration

Sliced and in the bath

Refreshed (50% hydration)

Refreshed alveoli

not.a.crumb.left's picture
not.a.crumb.left

what a beautiful lacy crumb and one day I love to venture more into this territory...I come across it sometimes and get very curious but not quite yet...Thank you for your patience in explaining. I was thinking of preferments that use SD either liquid or more stiff such at 60% or 50% and want to learn next to see how they affect and create different style and taste of breads.

Your loaf is beautiful and must taste great with all that spelt!!