The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

What will the bread be like if I spike my mixed grain 1:2:3 with yeast water?

leslieruf's picture
leslieruf

What will the bread be like if I spike my mixed grain 1:2:3 with yeast water?

I had some left over milled grain flour sitting in the fridge.   Need a brown bread!

So I started off weighing flour to see what sized loaf, the plan was for 600 g 1:2:3
9 gm kamut
45 g spelt
93 g whole wheat
30 g rye
ok,  need to make a bigger loaf than planned as I want whole grain below 50% and I had just enough levain ready to go.  So I added 217 g bread flour and 6 g gluten flour, autolysed with 245 g water and 21 g yeast water (warmed up from fridge) for 45 minutes.  Then added 133 g levain ( 100% hydration) and. did 100 SLAFs.  Added the 7.2 g salt + another 10 g yeast water. after another 105 SLAF I left the dough to bulk ferment. 4 sets of coil/ stretch & fold were done (dough was a a bit firm for the coils but I didn't want to increase hydration further. 3 hours after finishing the SLAFs I preshaped dough, rested 30 minutes then shaped and retarded over night in banneton in the fridge.  Nicely risen this morning and baked at 240°C in DO for 15 mins lid on and 15 mins lid off.

dough was lovely to work with although a little grainy from kamut. It held its shape well overnight although I did think it might overproof because of the yeast water.  Normally when I use YW I make a poolish but this time just added as part of the liquid. 

Flavour is lovely, couldn’t resist some for lunch yesterday before it was sliced and frozen. So perhaps a little more open with the YW, not sure, but it is definitely not a dense or heavy loaf.  Positive outcome, I will add some YW more often I think.  It wasn’t a big percentage either.  

Happy baking
Leslie

Comments

Abe's picture
Abe (not verified)

Has excellent oven spring. I've heard of spiking with yeast water for this purpose so you get the best of both. Looks like it worked a treat Leslie. But then again your loaves always look excellent. Spiked with yeast water or straight up sourdough you always get a very fine crumb. This one is no exception. 

leslieruf's picture
leslieruf

I just wanted to be sure of a relatively open crumb with all the grain.  So I was really happy that it worked so well.  I also didn’t want a flat loaf so didn’t want to push the hydration.

Will go look for your latest bake,  bake happy Abe

Leslie

Bread1965's picture
Bread1965

The crumb really does look great. I've often thought I should develop a yeast water and use it for all the water in a recipe. I don't think there would be a downside and would help oven spring. Your loaf seems to prove the point! ..frank

 

leslieruf's picture
leslieruf

Mine is made from raspberries just because I have them in the garden.  I also add a few raisins and have now kept this one going over the winter and into this summer by using the raisins, frozen raspberries.  It smells gorgeous. 

Edit: darn ipad locks up!  I also add a little fresh orange peel from my home grown oranges and that helps.  

But going back to this loaf, I was concerned that it would ferment too fast so held back on YW but next time will up the amount.  Might as well use the YW rather than leave it in the fridge!  thank you for your kind words

Leslie

 

Bread1965's picture
Bread1965

I made one once from leftover raw honey in a pail I was using to fill jars. I added a small bit of water and rinsed out the pail into a mason jar.  Within a week It smelled incredible. It's been a while but i think i added some fruit. I kept it going for a few weeks.  But keeping it over winter sounds ambitious. How often did you add fruit to it over the winter.. and I assume you kept it in the fridge the entire time? You're very lucky to be able to grow your own oranges! That must be a treat! ..frank!

 

leslieruf's picture
leslieruf

and refreshed it monthly with raisins and maybe half a dozen defrosted frozen raspberries. I normally take off about half the liquid and strain out the fruit then add fresh water and fruit.  The little bit of orange peel just seems to help keep it good. I usually leave it at room temperature until it is showing good activity before I pop it back in the fridge. 

Yeah, I love having my own oranges - we have two trees, one is a naval orange (? californian) and this supplies oranges August to December. the other is a less strong flavour and very juicy and it is ripe now through our summer. 

bake happy Frank

Leslie

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

extra moist.  Its greatest feats come whit whole grain breads where is spring and moistness really come to bear.  It is also good for folks who don't like sour bread as it mutes the SD sour a great deal.  Where it really shines is with High percent rye breads.  You need the acid from the SD to counteract the amylase activity that destroys rye crumb structure and give strength to the crumb matrix that has little gluten.  But the YW has a huge role to play to open the crumb and give more spring to a really dense loaf.  It also lends sweetness to the dough that a high percent rye bread really needs it.  

This bread really came out nice and not too much over proofed. It has to be sweeter side of sourdough for sure and just as tasty!  Well done and happy baking Leslie

leslieruf's picture
leslieruf

to open the crumb but didn’t know about the rye.  makes it more fun to be able to add YW to the options.  usually I make a poolish so was happy it worked well without.

thanks dabrownman

Leslie

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

a poolish, then SD has a head start and the YW will not mute as much of the sour as it would if the YW was more developed as a poolish and more n par with the YW levain so your bread should  retain more of the sour side.