The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Long Ferment of a yeast bread.

Empire's Chef Chris's picture
Empire's Chef Chris

Long Ferment of a yeast bread.

Ive been playing around with my yeast breads trying to get a long fermentation out of them like I would my sourdough. I've tried keeping the whole process cold from start to finish, using 45F water to mix, letting the bread do its bulk ferment in the fridge then final fermentation after the loaves are formed in the fridge for up to 18 hours. I have had moderate success so far, got a nice flavor, pretty crumb and a thin but still very crusty crust (would like it to be a little thicker of a crust) but the bread just isnt pretty looking at all. Wanted to see if anyone else has tried this and if so with what results? If you've had success tips would be greatly appreciated. Am I just asking to much from my yeast breads?

netfan's picture
netfan

What yeast are you using?  Fresh yeast has allowed me to experiment successfully in the way you are describing, but not dried...

Empire's Chef Chris's picture
Empire's Chef Chris

i am using active dry yeast. I will give fresh yeast a try too thank you. Whats the longest successful ferment you have gotten this way?

Lazy Loafer's picture
Lazy Loafer

I make a bread regularly (at least 10 loaves every week) that is made with a poolish. For each loaf there is about 1/8 tsp of ADY in the poolish, then another 1/8 tsp in the final dough. I bulk ferment the dough for a couple of hours at room temperature, then divide the mass into two batches, one six loaves, the other four. The smaller batch of dough goes into the fridge overnight for a bulk ferment. The larger batch gets scaled, shaped, and then put into the fridge for a retarded final proof. In the morning I bake the six loves straight out of the fridge (they will be beautifully risen by then), and the four loaves get shaped and proof at room temperature for a couple of hours. Generally the loaves that were proofed (shaped) in the fridge are a little more risen than the loaves that were shaped and proofed at room temperature, but both turn out beautifully. Maybe it's the poolish that makes the difference?