The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Tip - Ankarsrum Dough Hook - Alternate Method

DanAyo's picture
DanAyo

Tip - Ankarsrum Dough Hook - Alternate Method

Jim, aka Jimbtv, told me recently about a new method he discovered to use the Ankarsrum dough hook. He gave me permission to post it.

Yesterday, I got a chance to try the method. I was using the dough hook for a 60% dough. The dough kept running up the hook. Then I tried his advice. I removed the hook from the swing arm, but left it attached in the attachment hole. Since it wasn’t attached to the swing arm I was able to manually move the hook in a greater arc by hand. After this change the dough never ran up the hook again. But the greatest benefit was that I was able to knead the dough much more efficiently as I manually moved the hook.

Obviously, this can’t be done with the roller because it needs the swing arm to attach it to the mixer.

If you get a chance, give it a try. You may really like it. I know I do. 

Dan

MontBaybaker's picture
MontBaybaker

Thanks Dan!  I haven't used the hook much as the roller just seems to do a better job of mixing.  Will test your method next time.  I started something with the hook recently and switched back to the roller - figured I'd done something wrong but didn't have time to look up videos.

DanAyo's picture
DanAyo

I am also a fan of the roller, but for lower hydrations I use the dough hook.

Dan

liz grieve's picture
liz grieve

Hi Dan How long do you knead the dough with the hook Does it take as long as the roller that takes some time I will be baking tomorrow

Thanks Liz

Fausto's picture
Fausto

Hi

Check this kneading out: 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VfC4lXay7Ak 

depending on the dough, it should take around 15 to 20 min.

happy bakings

DanAyo's picture
DanAyo

Liz, it depends on how developed you want your dough to be machine kneaded. The video posted by Fausto below shows a completely developed dough that is beautiful. The video shows the dough as is progresses through the development process.

As with everything in bread baking there are many variables to consider. I think it is much better to go by the look and feel of the kneaded dough than a specific time. It is very easy to visually discern the degree of development. If you want to know more specifics post the instructions and the formula.

Dan

DanAyo's picture
DanAyo

I think the dough hook develops the dough much quicker. But, I often use the roller on wet doughs because it seems more gentle.

But, IMO the hook or the roller beats the Kitchenaid type mixers. The dough temperature doesn’t rise much with the hook and only very slightly with the roller.

Dan

liz grieve's picture
liz grieve

Hi Dan and Fausto 

Thank you both for your replies

I usually use the roller but I was interested to find out how it takes with the hook The roller certainly takes time  I hand mix and autolyse and then into mixer for bassinage and adding the salt etc

I have started warming the bowl in the winter time as it takes for ever to reach dough temperature  The resulting bread is alway good just a multi seeded yeast bread However I am now on a mega sourdough journey  

Dan you would really love the new book The Sourdough School by Vanessa Kimbell Its a brilliant book written by a very passionate sourdough teacher I believe it will be published in USA in September but you can order a signed copy  directly from the sourdough school in the UK   It certainly complements Trevors e book 

Time to feed the beasties....

Happy Baking 

Liz 

 

DanAyo's picture
DanAyo

I read the kindle version of her book. I enjoyed the read.

The dough hook will definitely develop the gluten faster than the roller. Jim bakes commercially and he likes the dough hook. Personally, I think they both have their place. I like the hook for drier doughs.

Dan