The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Durum Semolina Yeast Water Bread

isand66's picture
isand66

Durum Semolina Yeast Water Bread

 

This is my second attempt at a similar bread.  I wanted to use my new Apple/Orange Yeast Water to make a Levain for this bread and not use any other sour dough levain.  When I did this a few weeks ago I didn't let the levain ripen long enough and the dough didn't develop correctly.  This time I let the levain go for a good 12 hours and then refrigerated and used it the next day.  No problem this time with developing the dough correctly.

I used some fresh milled and sifted Durum flour along with KAF bread flour and Caputo 00 flour.  For some extra crumb softness I added Greek yogurt and olive oil as well.  The sifted out germ and bran from the Durum flour was soaked in some of the water for the dough and added back in the final mix.

All in all I was happy with how this one came out.  I was surprised the crumb wasn't a little more open but it tastes great and made some excellent grilled bread brushed with some olive oil and topped with some sharp aged cheddar cheese.

Formula

 

Download the BreadStorm File Here

Levain Directions

Mix all the Levain ingredients together for about 1 minute and cover with plastic wrap.  Let it sit at room temperature for around 12 hours or until the starter is nice and bubbly.  I put it in the refrigerator overnight and used it the next day.

 Main Dough Procedure

Mix the flours , yogurt and water together in your mixer or by hand until it just starts to come together, maybe about 1 minute.  Let it rest in your work bowl covered for 1 hour.  Next add the salt, starter, and olive oil and mix on low for 4 minutes.  Remove the dough from your bowl and place it in a lightly oiled bowl or work surface and do several stretch and folds.  Let it rest covered for 10-15 minutes and then do another stretch and fold.  Let it rest another 10-15 minutes and do one additional stretch and fold.  After a total of 2 hours place your covered bowl in the refrigerator and let it rest for 12 to 24 hours.

When you are ready to bake remove the bowl from the refrigerator and let it set out at room temperature still covered for 1.5 to 2 hours.  Remove the dough and shape as desired.   Place your dough into your proofing basket(s) and cover with a moist tea towel or plastic wrap sprayed with cooking spray.  The dough will take 1.5 to 2 hours depending on your room temperature.  Let the dough dictate when it is read to bake not the clock.

Around 45 minutes before ready to bake, pre-heat your oven to 520 degrees F. and prepare it for steam.  I have a heavy-duty baking pan on the bottom rack of my oven with 1 baking stone on above the pan and one on the top shelf.  I pour 1 cup of boiling water in the pan right after I place the dough in the oven.

Right before you are ready to put them in the oven, score as desired and then add 1 cup of boiling water to your steam pan or follow your own steam procedure.

After 1 minute lower the temperature to 450 degrees.  Bake for 25-35 minutes until the crust is nice and brown and the internal temperature of the bread is 205 degrees.

Take the bread out of the oven when done and let it cool on a bakers rack before for at least 2 hours before eating.

 

Comments

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Odd about the crumb but it has to taste great.  I have the perfect topping to the grilled bruschetta.  When we got back from Houston after 5 weeks the cherry tomato plants had seen better days, as had the lettuce,  but they were loaded with hundreds of tomatoes that were perfectly ripe.  Bought some mini fresh mozzarella balls and Parmesan and mixed in fresh cracked black pepper, tangerine balsamic vinegar, manzanilla olive oil from Spain and fresh basil from the garden.  It was so good we didn't even put it on grilled bread:-)

Well done and happy baking .

isand66's picture
isand66

Glad to hear you are back home finally.  Lucy must be so happy now :).  Those tomatoes must have tasted great especially with all those extra goodies you mixed them up with.

This one does taste really good and I've been eating it non-stop.

Look forward to seeing some baking and cooking from you soon now that you are back home again.

Happy Baking.

Ian

hreik's picture
hreik

Would Like to dip a slice in good olive oil and eat w a tomato.  And also same thing toasted.  Nicely done.

hester

isand66's picture
isand66

You are on the right track!  Making me hungry just thinking about it.

Happy baking.

Ian

Danni3ll3's picture
Danni3ll3

That has to be tasty! And thank you for the detailed write up! It is very helpful to see procedures. Well done!

isand66's picture
isand66

Glad you like it.  It sure is a tasty one and I'm always happy to provide details in case anyone wants to try their own hand at it :).

Regards,
Ian

Lechem's picture
Lechem (not verified)

I've been thinking about doing a YW version. The interesting characteristic of durum wheat is it's total lack of tang when doing a sourdough. This got me thinking why not try a YW version? Just today I baked an Altamura style loaf as I had some durum flour starter left and used up the remainder of the flour I had in stock. Your loaf looks wonderful and my next attempt should be with YW. I'm curious as to what YW would bring to the flour. Does it impart some lovely flavour being sweet where tang is totally lost on this flour? 

isand66's picture
isand66

I hope you give this one a try.  The YW certainly adds its own flavor profile and this one was a little sweet I think from the YW.  It definitely brings out the unique durum flavor that's for sure.  Let me know if you try it and you have any questions.

Regards,
Ian

Cedarmountain's picture
Cedarmountain

That's a beautiful loaf, I like the scoring pattern and the crust looks perfect.  The olive oil is a great idea, must make for a really delicious bread, I will have to try that. Thanks for the recipe details.  Nicely done Ian!

isand66's picture
isand66

I wasn't sure if the scoring was going to hold since I thought I might have over-proofed this one, but it turns out it was just right.  The crust is just right too, so I was very happy all around with this one after not baking a YW bread in quite some time.  I just need to pick up some fresh Mozzarella to add to the olive oil!
I hope you give it a try and let me know what you think. 

Happy Baking.

Ian

nmygarden's picture
nmygarden

A very nice bake. And even better, there's plenty of it! I need to start a new YW, and have some grapes that just may be good candidates for the job. I must admit a bit of apprehension  with YW - it tends to look kind of yucky, and I'm never sure it's active enough. But I'll try again - maybe more experience will help.

Enjoy, and thanks for sharing!

C

isand66's picture
isand66

DA posted a nice YW primer so do a quick search and you will find it.  I have been leaving mine out on the counter and it's performing much better than when I used to refrigerate it.  I hope you give it a try as it's a nice fun tool to have in your baking arsenal.

Regards,
Ian

Elsie_iu's picture
Elsie_iu

It'll be a major upgrade to using bland white sandwich bread! I actually prefer a closer crumb for sandwiches, especially grilled cheese as the hot cheese often ooze out of large holes, making a mess and burning my fingers.

I've never baked with durum wheat before, must try it someday since your bread looks so nice with its addition.

isand66's picture
isand66

I love durum flour.  It has a unique nutty flavor that's one of my favorites.  I hope you try it soon yourself.

Regards,

Ian