The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Chocolate Malted Barley

DanAyo's picture
DanAyo

Chocolate Malted Barley

I thought it might be interesting to others, so I decided to post this bake. I got interested in malted barley a while back. I was learning about diastatic malt and one thing led to another. Wendy, aka “LazyLoafer”, among others helped my learning process. I went to a local “Home Brew” shop and picked out an assortment of malted grains, mostly barley. It is very inexpensive and I chose the whole grain since I have a home mill. Most, if not all of the malts are non-diastatic.

The chocolate malt (my favorite) in tiny amounts make a really distinct difference in any bread. The color of the crust and crumb are darkened dramatically. The flavor of the bread has a unique mildly bitter unsweetened chocolate, or maybe coffee taste. 

Below is a 78% Tartine. The crust is not burnt, the color comes from the malted barley.

It only takes a tiny amount of malted barley to affect these result. I used 2% of the bread’s flour. The image below shows 10g of fresh ground barley.

Dan

 

Bred Maverick's picture
Bred Maverick

that looks wonderful! If you livedw closer to NY, I'd invite myself over for a slice😋

DanAyo's picture
DanAyo

Dan

agmeneghin's picture
agmeneghin

Your loaf looks great. I don't have a mill, do you think I could get the grain fine enough with a food processor?

 

Al

DanAyo's picture
DanAyo

I think it would work, Al, But the stores will grind it for you.

agmeneghin's picture
agmeneghin

I'm going to check it out at the local brewery and supply store to see if they have and will grind the malt.. If not have you ever used a stout instead of water to mix the dough?

DanAyo's picture
DanAyo

No, I know nothing about stout

agmeneghin's picture
agmeneghin

The local brewer's supply was out of chocolate malted barley but had some in rye. I had them grind it up, thanks for the tip, but they only could grind it down to a coarse grits texture. We' ll see if the food processor will get it finer.

Al

Lazy Loafer's picture
Lazy Loafer

I've used both stout and lighter ale in breads, usually as the liquid in the pre-ferment (poolish), and they are mighty fine! I've also used several kinds of malts (crystal, chocolate and others), which all seem to be fantastic in bread.

DanAyo's picture
DanAyo

Wendy, if you were using beer in a sourdough, how would you use it? Would a Poolish and Levain work the same way?

How does beer affect the fermentation?

Dan

Lazy Loafer's picture
Lazy Loafer

I don't know Dan, I've never tried beer sourdough. However, Hamelman has a recipe in "Bread" that is made with a rye sour (88% hydration) and a liquid levain (125% hydration), as well as beer for some of the liquid in the main dough. Perhaps you should try some experiments and let us know how it turns out!

DanAyo's picture
DanAyo

Great, I’ve got his book.

I just had a sandwich made with the bread. It amazes me how 10 grams of chocolate malt could make such a difference to the flavor profile. I like breads with intense flavor. Seeds and cracked grains, Toadies, and malt are my favorites.

I really appreciate the initial help you gave me.

Dan

agmeneghin's picture
agmeneghin

I mixed up a batch of Champlain SD and substituted Lazy Magnolia Sweet Potato Stout for the water. The initial mix was pretty much like the other Champlain's I've done and the color's a little lighter than Dan's with the chocolate malt. After overnight in the frig, the dough handled much stronger initially but after about 5 minutes settled down to slightly stronger than the regular Champlain. Shaping was also a bit easier, the dough handled like a lower hydration. It's retarding overnight and we'll see what happens tomorrow. This is really a taste experiment and if it works I'm thinking of adding in walnuts and possibly blue cheese. If anyone has tried blue cheese as an enrichment I'd love to hear about your experience.

Al

Lazy Loafer's picture
Lazy Loafer

I'm going to try Hamelman's beer bread, and I think I'll add some caramelized onions (I'm going to make a huge batch in the slow cooker tonight) and maybe a touch of mustard. :)

DanAyo's picture
DanAyo

Looking forward to pictures and hearing about your experience. 

dan

agmeneghin's picture
agmeneghin

I finally baked this loaf today, The dough came out of the frig relatively firm and was easy to scored. Baked it straight from the frig into a hot DO and oven at 515 deg.I did give it a light misting after the scoring. 20 min. covered then reduced to 465 for an additional 15 min. Final internal temp 208 dog.  Monitored the internal temp until it had dropped to 79 deg and had to cut it. I was pretty happy with the crumb and wanted to do a large taste test so I cut the boule into quarters and that crumb was even better though I'm puzzled how the crumb could change so much. I gave  3 quarters of this loaf with 3 quarters of an original Champlain loaf to 3 neighbors tonight and asked them to taste them side by side. In the house, the votes are one for the plain and one for the stout. I'm undecided. I was afraid that the stout would completely overwhelm the more subtle tastes of the bread and to some extent it does adding a fuller/rounder taste to the bread with just a hint of chocolate/coffee. The original Champlain has brighter notes of wheat. We'll see when the neighbors get back to me.

agmeneghin's picture
agmeneghin

Hi Lazy Loaf,

I think you'll need a huge batch. I made a carmelized onion and parmesan loaf with two large onion and wished it had more. Love to see how it turns out.

andythebaker's picture
andythebaker

i'll have to try this.  thanks for sharing.

kenlklaser's picture
kenlklaser

With what tool did you grind your malt? 

 
DanAyo's picture
DanAyo

I have a KoMo grain mill. But I called the store and it seems the HomeBrew Stores will grind it for you. You only need a small amount. Here is a link to my local store, but there is probably some near you. http://www.lahomebrew.com/Brewing-Grains-s/1817.htm

Dan

dukethebeagle120's picture
dukethebeagle120

i grind with a corona mill.

just pass 3-4 times and it works ok

i do malt rye and malt wheat

all with high dp

high dp gives yeast more to eat aka sugar

gives a nice bread

DanAyo's picture
DanAyo

What does do mean? I’m guessing diastatic power.

Please explain, I’m curious to learn.

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

enhances for bread and they are easy to make at home if you don't want 10 different kinds like we do:-)  I'm trying to keep mine down to 2 at a time, one NDS and one diastatic.  Right now they are rye but the previous batch was wheat.  Nothing like having fun in the kitchen!  

That bread looks killer and has to taste as good as it looks.

Very nice Dan

DanAyo's picture
DanAyo

Hey Dab, for flavor enhancers, I’m diggin’ dem Toadies.

Thanks for the help...

Dan

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Toady Tom's Tasty Toasted Tidbits.  Toadies is way easier to type when necessary:-)