The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Francisco Migoya - “Insights from Modernist Bread"

mwilson's picture
mwilson

Francisco Migoya - “Insights from Modernist Bread"

In May, 2017, 200 serious bread-heads gathered in Charlotte, NC for On the Rise, The Johnson & Wales University International Symposium on Bread, presented by Puratos. The Symposium’s theme was, “The Future of Bread” and ten internationally known experts on various facets of the subject offered fascinating presentations. Here is one by Francisco Migoya titled, “Insights from ‘Modernist Bread’ -- New Discoveries in the World of Bread Science.”

Some very enjoyable material discussed here which will surely appeal to any baker.
The book series Modernist Bread is now suddenly very tempting!

Floydm's picture
Floydm

I got an email yesterday announcing a follow up conference: On the Rise II. Thursday – Saturday, April 26-28, 2018, also in Charlotte NC. More info coming soon.

mwilson's picture
mwilson

Thanks for the info Floyd. Look forward to it!

CelesteU's picture
CelesteU

I eagerly bought the books, and now I kinda wish I had simply used the library's copy.  There are a few good nuggets here and there, but nothing absolutely mind blowing or earth shattering for a seasoned baker who's kept up with recent innovations celebrated in other baking cookbooks.  They're very nice to look at, an enjoyable coffee table kinda read....but I find the cookbook manual needlessly complicated in its recipe layout/format.  Have only made 2-3 recipes so far.

clazar123's picture
clazar123

That was phenomenal. I learned some things, confirmed others and discovered my bread education has been pretty spot on. I still can't afford he book but how great to ear all the research!

Thank you!

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

in their lab!  I kept thinking about TFL experiments over the years during the presentation.  

I'm also left wondering what they didn't find out...  what are the remaining mysteries? 

Wild-Yeast's picture
Wild-Yeast

I would gladly praise anyone who gave me a set as a gift. Until that time I suggest the following for Nathan's Myrvold's happy band of baking researchers:

1.) One is categorizing the different LABs with types of Wild Yeasts that produce stable symbiotic stasis in starter mixes followed by an in-depth DNA analysis.

2.) What's involved in moving a starter that it loses its characteristic taste after several weeks of use?

3.) Oven spring is supposedly caused by feverish yeast activity before dying. Where is this validated? An in-depth study with real-time video in situ microscopy would be great. 

I could go on but these are enough to start a list that should keep Nathan busy on a quest of "useful" discovery and out of the "Rocket Docket" Federal Court in the East Texas town of Marshall.

Wild-Yeast

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

of Austrian rye grain developed for human consumption  as opposed to silage.   Could apply to all of Europe and greater Asia.  That North American rye is planted more for animals food leaves me to wonder.  I have had successes with North American rye, at least the ones I played with but I did have to tweak timing and hydration, sometimes adding lemon juice to achieve good results.  Guess I have to pat myself on the back according to rye assessment.  

So where does that leave the American baker if the tests were conducted on Austrian rye?  

Was American einkorn tested?   Quick, somebody look it up if it's included in the testing... and if done on its own level, taking into consideration its slow absorption rates and uncanny buffering of sour notes in sourdough.  

Wild-Yeast's picture
Wild-Yeast

Is anyone using Bay State rye flour? Is it truly superior as per Francisco Migoya's testimony in the above YouTube video?

I've been using Central Milling's rye flour and after watching the above Migoya video I'm left wondering about whether the supply is powdered animal feed or is of a type bred for human consumption. 

Wild-Yeast

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

Sometimes I think the animals are fed better than we are.  Just think about the old strains of grain purists are seeking.  The strains that haven't been so manipulated over the centuries.  Working with rye does take some patience and experimentation when a laboratory isn't available.  It also means that if you're having trouble with a high rye recipe, don't be afraid to experiment a little it may not be you but the flour.  That's good news if you ask me, frustrating I know, but it does invite some "mad scientist" thinking.  I would like to see the DNA analysis of the different rye strains growing about on all continents.  Bet they are related to migrations. Is that googleable?  

Ah, the desire for breadable rye strains is declining as the need for animal feed is growing, also the demand for ethanol processing.  That sounds like a conflict of interests for sure.

Wild-Yeast's picture
Wild-Yeast

Mini,

It's the opposite. Have they been breading rye for better green fertilizer with the offshoot being animal feed if it is harvested. Is that the same rye that ends up as rye flour in North America? The rye flours in Europe are superior according to Migoya's lecture. His lab uses Central Milling flour but the fact that he didn't mention them may be one of omission though I think it was Central's that was called "scheiße" by the Austrian bakers...,

Wild-Yeast