The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Cherry Porridge Bread with Cheese

isand66's picture
isand66

Cherry Porridge Bread with Cheese

  We just went from Spring/Fall to Winter in one day on Long Island New York.  It was in the low 20's last night and this morning, perfect for a nice hearty porridge bread!

I recently bought some nice plump organic dried cherries from Trader Joe's and we had bought some Parmesan Cheese rinds at Whole Foods to use in sauces, etc. so of course both went into the porridge mixture along with oats, malted wheat flakes and cracked spelt (left-over from sifting the spelt flour).  I used milk to add some extra creaminess in the porridge.

The majority of the flour in this one was freshly milled with my Mock II grain mill and sifted to get the big bits out.

The cherries and cheese were a perfect combination.  This is one of the those loaves you can eat with nothing on it, but a schmear of butter or cream cheese doesn't hurt either :).

Download the BreadStorm File here.

Levain Directions

Mix all the levain ingredients together  for about 1 minute and cover with plastic wrap. (Note: I cut the Parmesan cheese from the rind into small pieces and added it to the levain).   Let it sit at room temperature for around 7-8 hours or until the starter has doubled.  I used my proofer set at 83 degrees and it took about 4 hours.  You can use it immediately in the final dough or let it sit in your refrigerator overnight.

Porridge Directions

Add about 3/4's of the milk called for in the porridge to the dry ingredients in a small pot set to low and stir constantly until all the milk is absorbed.  Add the remainder of the milk and keep stirring until you have a nice creamy and soft porridge.    Remove from the heat and let it come to room temperature before adding to the dough.  I put mine in the refrigerator and let it cool quicker.

 Main Dough Procedure

Mix the flours, and the water for about 1 minute.  Let the rough dough sit for about 20 minutes to an hour.  Next add the levain, cooled porridge, olive oil and salt and mix on low for 5 minutes.  Add the cheese and mix until incorporated or you can add it by hand during the stretch and folds.  Remove the dough from your bowl and place it in a lightly oiled bowl or work surface and do several stretch and folds.  Let it rest covered for 10-15 minutes and then do another stretch and fold.  Let it rest another 10-15 minutes and do one additional stretch and fold.  After a total of 2 hours place your covered bowl in the refrigerator and let it rest for 12 to 24 hours.  (Since I used my proofer I only let the dough sit out for 1.5 hours before refrigerating).

When you are ready to bake remove the bowl from the refrigerator and let it set out at room temperature still covered for 1.5 to 2 hours.  Remove the dough and shape as desired.

The dough will take 1.5 to 2 hours depending on your room temperature and will only rise about 1/3 it's size at most.  Let the dough dictate when it is read to bake not the clock.

Around 45 minutes before ready to bake, pre-heat your oven to 550 degrees F. and prepare it for steam.  I have a heavy-duty baking pan on the bottom rack of my oven with 1 baking stone on above the pan and one on the top shelf.  I pour 1 cup of boiling water in the pan right after I place the dough in the oven.

Right before you are ready to put them in the oven, score as desired and then add 1 cup of boiling water to your steam pan or follow your own steam procedure.

After 5 minute lower the temperature to 450 degrees.  Bake for 35-50 minutes until the crust is nice and brown and the internal temperature of the bread is 205 degrees.

Take the bread out of the oven when done and let it cool on a bakers rack before for at least 2 hours before eating.

 

 

Comments

Lechem's picture
Lechem (not verified)

What lovely porridge breads you come up with. No end to your baking creativity. 

Lovely as always. 

isand66's picture
isand66

Appreciate your kind words.  This one was a keeper and worth trying if you get a chance.

Regards,
Ian

Danni3ll3's picture
Danni3ll3

Not something that I would have thought of doing! I am going to have to try this!

isand66's picture
isand66

look forward to seeing your version.  It is a tasty combination.

Regards,

Ian

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

all right!  This has to be one healthy, hearty bread that tastes great!  I've got so dried cherries from sprouts somewhere.  I was putting them on salads for the longest time I wonder if there are e=any left?  Got to get the smoker going for mushrooms, onion and sausage for the pizza tonight , and get the sauce going too I guess,  Sounds too cold for Lucy on LI.  It is still in the 80's here and just perfect.  Lucy sends her best to the black ones and the 5 furry kitties.

Happy baking Ian

isand66's picture
isand66

i think Lucy will like this combo as it sure was tasty.

That pizza sounds to die for.  Miss seeing your insane pizza pies.  

A week ago it was in the 60-70 degree range and the last few days it's been below freezing at night and not much better during the day.  I like y weather much better!

Max, Lexi and the rest of the gang say hi to their West coast girl.

Happy Baking and Pizza eating :)

MontBaybaker's picture
MontBaybaker

Another yummy-looking bread of yours on the list for the new starter-in-process!  You mentioned cheese rinds at Whole Foods.  Did you just buy hunks of cheese (such an addicting counter), or can you ask for extra rinds separately?  I'd  love to have extra in the freezer.  It's a 1 hour round-trip to WF so don't get there often, and the nearest cheese shop is even further down the coast in Carmel.  Thanks!

isand66's picture
isand66

Glad you like this one.  Not all Whole Foods may offer the cheese rinds.  Mine sells it in a plastic container and there was enough actual cheese on them to use in the bread.  You can certainly just use a nice hard cheese and not worry about the rinds.  You don't use the actual rind in this case, but they are good for sauces and soups to add extra flavor.

Good luck and I look forward to hearing how yours turns out.

Regards,
Ian