The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Spelt, Rye, Einkorn & Organic AP

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

Spelt, Rye, Einkorn & Organic AP

Basically a 1-2-3 Sourdough formula using two fresh baby Rye and Einkorn sourdough starters.  Started respectfully on Friday and Thursday of last week, this is their first loaf.  Last night they had peaked in activity (4 and 3 days old) and I combined:

1)   215g sourdough starter,  predominantly a rye sour 

2)   350g water with 50g Whole Einkorn flour Tangzhong.      Making a 70% hydration dough

3)   600g of flour:  100g fine Rye, 100g Whole Einkorn, 200g fine Spelt, and 200g Organic AP wheat.  (not much strength there!)

   14g salt    14g Bread Spice

Mixed up, covered and let sleep 16°C overnight or 14 hrs.  It did rise about 1/2 so did one set of folds in the morning followed by a shaping.  The dough just seemed to be far enough along at 11 am that no other handling seemed needed.   Banneton rise at 24°C.   

Bake 240°C for 20min with steam pan.  Remove steam, rotate,  reduced to 200°C for 20 minutes.  Inside temp 100°C (212°F)

Comments

ANNA GIORDANI's picture
ANNA GIORDANI

Straordinario colore della crosta e bella fioritura dei tagli.

BRAVA!!! Complimenti vivissimi e chissà che gusto e che profumo.....

Un saluto, Anna

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

The baking aroma was so wonderfully powerful.   I was drawn back to the oven before my timer.  To come inside to a home smelling of baking rye is just, well, one has to be there.  On my list of life's little pleasures.  

Mini

hreik's picture
hreik

Just gorgeous.

hester

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

matter what flour, just stick to one or a special flour mixture all thru the starter growing process.  

I started a rye (although I already have a rye starter) to compare to the einkorn starter which turned out to be one day slower than the rye.  They caught up to each other on Monday.  The einkorn starter was smaller than the rye as I had already removed part of it for a poor recipe that rushed the fermenting process.  That loaf had to be rescued with instant yeast.   I had never made an einkorn starter before so didn't know if it would act like a gluten free starter or a wheat one.  

As soon as it started smelling yeasty and bubbles collecting and rising to pop on the surface (and those wonderful pungent aromas showed up)  I knew I had to at least double the size of the starter when I fed it.  The container soon becomes cramped so some discarding has to be done.  It is very easy to just keep going, doubling (tripling or quadrupling)  the amount of flour to starter with pauses between; waiting until enough starter is ripe to make bread dough.   Usually in one or two feedings.  So have your recipe on standby (I tape inside a nearby cupboard) ready when the yeast get going knowing exactly how much starter is needed plus a little bit to feed for more starter.  Anything else gets composted or used as flavourings in other recipes.  (thickening soup, egg drop like noodles, pancakes, Mark's muffins)

I tend to jump to a generic recipe like the 1,2 3  when growing a wheat starter because no mater what the starter amount, all I have to do to make bread is double for water and triple for flour.  Yes, it is possible to just double the amount of flour to starter and add enough water to make a fine dough.  It's been done often enough.  Keep track of the flour so the salt can be figured out easily.  The more starter in the dough (to flour) the faster it ferments.  Do take into account temperatures.  Warm speeds things up, cool slows them down.  There are different ways to influence temperatures.  

Some flours will exhaust themselves sooner than others so pairing a slow fermenting sourdough starter with a weak flour can get you into bricks.  

As you can see with this bread, the starter and thus the dough fermented fast enough, had enough yeast to raise the shaped loaf while the flours remained bonded together.  This is a no knead recipe.  (The first thing I checked for in the morning, power of yeast in fed starters and the feel of the rested dough.)  

Not one of those flours can stand by itself for 16 hrs without some kind of help to make a sourdough loaf.  The rye needs sour and something to slow down enzymes, the spelt needs rye to weigh it down, the einkorn needs more gluten the AP also has a time limit and deteriorates quickly but provides more gluten and combines into the protein bonds in the other flours.  Together with salt and enough hydration (felt like a lower hydration) they did it.  The combination of flours resisted deterioration while building flavour long enough to raise a loaf of bread.  I just slit it up and baked it before it doubled.  

hreik's picture
hreik

for the long explanation.  The more this newbie knows the better. 

a_warming_trend's picture
a_warming_trend

I'd love to see the crumb, when you slice it!

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

 

I stole the bottom 2mm for colouring for the next loaf.  It was a bit toasty (not burnt) but I wanted that flavour crumbled and inside another loaf.  I later brushed the loaf outside knocking off most of the flour.  Cut with the electric slicer.

This slice is 9cm tall.  

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Mini.  Has to taste great with all the multi grain too.  Well done and happy baking  

hanseata's picture
hanseata

like a wonderful loaf! Great crumb, too!

Karin

 

a_warming_trend's picture
a_warming_trend

making me want to try Einkorn! What a perfect loaf for sandwiches or hearty toast. 

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

about is the price of Einkorn flour.  I pay €2 a kilo in the supermarket.  

Still in the range of feasible, but higher prices would be a deterrent.  

€2 = $2.26 US Dollars    1 kg = 2.20 lb      So almost $1 per pound.

 What are the prices out there?

a_warming_trend's picture
a_warming_trend

Mini, I don't know a lot of details about Einkorn, but that sounds pretty reasonable to me! A 5-pound bag of KA AP flour here is about $4.50 to $4.90. 

pdiff's picture
pdiff

I've been thinking about something like this for a long time and now you've inspired me! :)  

One question: What do you mean by Bread Spice?

Thank you,

 

Bill

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

of toasted lightly crushed, caraway, coriander and fennel seeds.  I used about 2% to 3% of the flour weight.  Slightly less  if pre-soaked in the starter.  Different bakers have their preferred blend that gets added to dark bread doughs.  Bread spices are seldom mentioned in basic recipes but the "secret" ingredient to regional breads.

They may also include other spices and seeds but this is one basic blend.

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/comment/100603#comment-100603

pdiff's picture
pdiff

Thank you for the info.  I baked up a couple of loaves this morning (started yesterday without spice) and was pleased with the first try.  I was fortunate enough to have Einkorn and Spelt berries on hand that I had picked up a while back intending to try something like this.  The local coop (Moscow, ID) sometimes has berries from small growers in western WA.  Now I need to find more.  The hydration was a bit higher than you suggested and I just used my standard AP wheat starter, but it worked well enough.  Will need to try with the spices next time, although it was tasty as is! :)  Hoping to scale up a bit to 6+ loaves to try in the wood oven.  Thanks again!

 

 

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

If you can manage the higher hydration, go for it.  Esp. in a wood oven.  

Funny you should mention Moscow ID.  When we road tripped from Canada south thru Spokane, Idaho, Utah (had to speed on the salt speedway :)) and east to CO crossing and dropping below I-70 to I-40 we spent the night in a little town called Kit Carson.  The owners had just bought and started renovating having several rooms available.  They saw our WA plates and told us they were from Moscow ID.  A hard working couple with home baked goodies for breakfast.  :)  A "Hi Y'all" to Idaho and to Kit Carson.  :)

deva's picture
deva

You seem a master to me.  I keep making bread, sometimes thinknibg too much of my skills like the french loaves I tried to make last week without a recipe...they are edible but not what I was hoping for.  

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

Where did you start and what did you want to end up with?  Let's have some fun with it.  :)

Song Of The Baker's picture
Song Of The Baker

Hi Mini.  How come it seems like a bake post from you is a special event?  For all the contribution you give to this forum, you rarely post your bakes.  This loaf looks great.  I like the non-typical flours you used in this one.  Happy baking.

John

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

my purple yam flour experiment, just for you.  (later)   :)

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

Please note that I am using Bio Vollkornmehl  or Whole Einkorn flour  

 for 100g flour

  • calories            348 kcal    
  • Protein               15 g
  • carb.                  58 g sugar
  • of that, sugar    1.5 g
  • fat                     4.1 g
  • fibre                  9.4 g