The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Sprouted Spelt, Barley, Rye and Wheat Sourdough with 5 Seeds and Brazil Nuts

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Sprouted Spelt, Barley, Rye and Wheat Sourdough with 5 Seeds and Brazil Nuts

This week Lucy came up with a combination method; part no knead, part slap and fold and part stretch and fold to go along with her recent sprouted flour fetish..  the whole grain sprouts this week were; spelt,  rye, barley and wheat and made up the 34%  whole grains in the mix.

 

After drying the sprouts, we milled them getting a 25% extraction of the hard bits.  This is the closest we have come to getting a 72% ‘straight flour of the remaining much whiter flour.  As usual we fed the hard bits to the now 11 week old retarded, 66% hydration, whole rye starter.

 

There was just enough left to hold back for next weeks baking at the 12 week mark and to refresh the starter back to its 120 g whole rye self which we did this week son that the starter when first used will be 2 weeks old in the fridge.

 

We love Andy’s Toasted Brazil Nut and prune bread and think that Brazil nuts, like pistachios, are vastly underutilized in bread making.  To mix things up, since we haven’t used any seeds for weeks, Lucy prescribed a 5 seeds mix of equal parts of toasted; chia, hemp (for the Queen of Seeds), flax  and poppy seeds with a tiny 5 gram amount of sesame seeds.  After grinding, she soaked them in 65 g of potato water for 24 hours since chia seeds are notorious for stealing water from the dough

 

The sesame seeds were light because that is all Lucy could find in her double secret, seedy store that she guards with her very life.   Ingredient guard duty is better than having to drag badgers out of holes like normal, non baking apprentice 2nd class dackels have to do I’m sure.  Still, she does go into every hole looking for them,   So, she must be genetically modified for it and can’t help herself like she can’t forego any food, of any kind that she can smell, locate and ‘Dackel Down.’ 

 

We retarded our built 3 stage levain for 12 hours instead of our usual 24 hours.  An hour after it came out of the fridge the next day to finish its 3rd stage doubling, we also autolysed the dough flour and soaked seeds for 1 hour.  All the liquid, except in the 6 g of seed starter, was potato water from boiling potatoes for the potato salad we made as a side for ribs.  Lucy throws nothing away.

 

Once the levain hit the autolyse that included the soaked seeds, we did 3 sets of slap and folds of 1 minute each, followed by 3 sets of stretch and folds from the compass points only.  All the stretching and folding we on 20 minute intervals.  The toasted Brazil nuts were incorporated on the 1st set of stretch and folds and they were well distributed by the end of the 3rd set.

 

This bread made for one fine smoked chicken sadwich for lunch.

We then shaped the dough into a boule, placed it into a rice floured basket, bagged it in our usual used trash can liner and left on the counter for 3 hours of fermenting.  Then into the fridge it went for a cold 20 hour retard where we hoped the dough would finish proofing and gluten development at the same time.

 

The next day the dough looked fairly proofed and we let it warm up on the counter as we preheated Big Old Betsy to 550 F and readied the Mega Steam.  The steam went in when the BOB hit 550 F and we waited another 15 minutes for the stone to catch up and the steam to be billowing like a thunderhead.

 

We un-molded the dough onto parchment on a peel, slashed it in a square and slid it onto the bottom stone for 15 minutes of steam as we gradually lowered the temperature to 475 F regular bake after the first 4 minutes.   Once the steam came out, we lowered the temperature to 425 F - convection and, in 15 more minutes, the bread was at 210 F and ready for the cooling rack.

 

It sprang and bloomed well enough and there were those small blisters we like very much.  The crust was mahogany and crunchy as it came out of the oven.  We will have to wait to see how the crumb came out and how it tastes until lunch time.  Lunch is over and the crust went softer as it cooled.  The crumb was fairly open, soft and moist for this kind oif bread too.   It tasted fantastic!  The seeds, Brazil nuts, sprouted whole grains and sour all worked so well together.  A tasty delight to eat for sure.  Deep and earthy flavor that is healthy, seedy and nutty all at once.  If there were figs in there somewhere, our taste buds might genetically mutate into the killer buds that tasted Chicago and the prison in Joliet.

 Smoked ribs and chicken for Cousin Jay who just bough a house in Phoenix and will be moving here in about a year- Yea!!!  We love Cousin Jay.  Then ther was the Thai green curry seafood for our daughter's last meal at home before heading back to school.

Formula

Sprouted MG SD Levain Build

Build 1

Build 2

 Build 3

Total

%

11 Week Retarded Rye Starter

6

0

0

6

1.39%

Whole Rye

6

0

0

6

1.39%

25% Ext Sprouted Whole Grain

0

12

28

40

9.28%

Potato Water

6

12

28

46

10.67%

Total

18

24

56

98

22.74%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Starter Totals

 

%

 

 

 

Flour

49

11.37%

 

 

 

Potato Water

49

11.37%

 

 

 

Levain Hydration

100.00%

 

 

 

 

Levain % of Total Flour  & Water

9.00%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

 

 

75% Ext. Sprouted Whole Grain

121

28.07%

 

 

 

Bread Flour

310

71.93%

 

 

 

Total Dough Flour

431

100.00%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Salt

9

1.88%

 

 

 

Potato Water

390

90.49%

 

 

 

Toasted Brazil Nuts

85

19.72%

 

 

 

5 Kinds of Toasted Seeds

85

19.72%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Hydration

64.89%

 

 

 

 

Total Flour w/ Starter

480

 

 

 

 

Potato Water 371 w/ Starter

439

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hydration with Starter

91.46%

 

 

 

 

Total Weight

1,098

 

 

 

 

% Whole Grain - Sprouted Grain

33.54%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Toasted seeds are 20 g each of: chia, hemp,

 

 

 

 

poppy and flax with 5 g of sesame.  The seeds were

 

 

 

were then ground and soaked in 65 g of potato water 

 

 

 

overnight.  This Soaker liquid was included in the dough liquid

 

 

Lucy reminds us to never forget the salad but why not put the salad on a smoked rib quesadilla?

 

Comments

CAphyl's picture
CAphyl

dabrownman:  No question that the Brazil nuts add a wonderful element to this bread. It looks really delicious.  The taste must have been fabulous.  I wonder how different it would taste if you didn't use potato water? I bet it would be good with hazel nuts as well. I agree on the chia seeds; I almost don't like to throw them in the soaker. You get such wonderful crust; I am not able to get it this deep and wonderful crust; your BOB and steam methods work so well. I will put his on my list for this fall.  Thanks for sharing.  Best,  Phyllis

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Lucy posted the crumb shots and the crumb looks a good as the crust.  Those seeds really color the crumb and make it tasty too.  The crust color comes from the, and this is Lucy's guess, the bread is going in the oven cod even after warming for an hour and half on the counter, the bread is going in a very hot oven at 550 F to start and slowing going down, Mega Steam is billowing like crazy for a full 15 minutes, it is being baked between 2 stones for even retained heat and then finished in a low 425 F with the fan on and, once the bread hits 205 F we left it in the oven, now off, for another 5 minutes when it it 208 F.   Or. it is just pure Dumb Dackel Doofuss Dinklling :-)

You will like this bread Phyllis.  A perfect fall bread.  Glad you liked the post and

Happy Baking 

Kiseger's picture
Kiseger

Love the idea of adding brazil nuts, especially toasted.  This looks most delicious!  Ribs and curry look great too, what a cook!  Big hug for Lucy, well done!

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

bread is also very good.  We love the way the crumb of this bread is bejeweled with seeds and the taste is superb.  Being a closet chef allows me to cook every day of the week but I only get to bake once a week for bread maybe twice with with pie.or some other desert so we get to try many other foods.  The ribs are easy enough to make, like SD bread making, with a couple minutes of work and hours of waiting.  The curry is a lot of work just getting the 35 ingredients together, if you don't make your own curry paste!.  Then there all the veggie chopping and the cooking of it.  But, it is all worth it... if you are half as nuts as Lucy and I.  Cooking is a way to travel on the cheap in your mind and remember all the places you have been in your life but can't afford to go there anymore:-).

Glad you like the post and happy baking.  Here is a picture of just the veggies being stir fried for the curry - a beauty all by itself,

isand66's picture
isand66

Another beauty DA.  Perfect crust and crumb.  Lucy needs to come visit with Lexie and Max and hunt for badgers at the doggie park.  They managed to find some tunnel system and had their whole head down some type of critters hole.

Those ribs and chicken look awesome as always.  Love the rib quesadilla as well.

It is amazing how many different ways and methods one can use to make good bread.

Happy Baking from Max, Lexie and the gang of 5.

Ian

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

be heading up to Long Island any time soon but you never know when it comes to her wants and needs - so a picture or two will have to do.   I too am amazed at all the stuff that can go in bread and the many ways to make it.  I used to joke that Lucy and I have made nearly 300 different breads over the last 2 and a half years and only have 9,700 more to go.  At 100 a year, we only have 97 years to go which is fine since we are going to live forever :-)

Glad you liked the bread and here is a shot of Lucy for the Gang of 7.   Happy Baking Ian

Mebake's picture
Mebake

As always, the bread and food Look delicious, DA.

What are your scoring tool?

Khalid

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

of it was delicious but the bread is one of our favorites. We like the flavor of sprouted grains made into flour and heve been stuck on it of late. We don't have a lame so we use a variety of slashing tools, paring knife, serrated tomato knife, bread knife and in this case a single edge razor. Nothing is going to slice through those Brazil nuts cleanly and what ever you use is going to get hung up on one somewhere :-) This slash job came out pretty rough making ti look a litle rustic which is why us bread makers make so many rustic loaves of various kinds :-)

Good luck with the next market Khalid and happy baking!