The Fresh Loaf

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Ian's Oat Porridge Bread

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isand66's picture
isand66

Ian's Oat Porridge Bread

Last week I made the Oat Porridge Bread from Tartine 3 and I loved it.  I wanted to take that basic idea and convert it to my normal procedures using a larger amount of per-fermented flour and a bulk retarding of the dough in the refrigerator.

Well I have to say it was a great success.  I find this method much easier and I think the final bread actually has a more complex flavor with the same creamy moist crumb.  I highly recommend that you try this as I know you will like it and like it a lot!

I used my standard refreshed AP starter at 66% this time instead of adding some whole wheat to the starter, mainly for convenience sake.  I also added some wheat germ which was suggested in the original formula.

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Ian's Porridge Bread (%)

Ian's Porridge Bread (weights)

 

Here are the Zip files for the above BreadStorm files.

 

Levain Directions

Mix all the levain ingredients together  for about 1 minute and cover with plastic wrap.  Let it sit at room temperature for around 7-8 hours or until the starter has doubled.  I used my proofer set at 83 degrees and it took about 4 hours.

Oat Porridge Directions

Add about 3/4's of the water called for the porridge to the rolled oats in a small pot set to low and stir constantly until all the water is absorbed.  Add the remainder of the water and keep stirring until you have a nice creamy and soft porridge.  Remove from the heat and let it come to room temperature before adding to the dough.  I put mine in the refrigerator and let it cool quicker.

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 Main Dough Procedure

Mix the flours and wheat germ with the main dough and the water for about 1 minute.  Let the rough dough sit for about 20 minutes to an hour.  Next add the levain, cooled porridge and salt and mix on low for 4 minutes and speed #2 for another 2 minutes or by hand for about 6 minutes.   You should end up with a cohesive dough that is slightly tacky but very manageable.  Remove the dough from your bowl and place it in a lightly oiled bowl or work surface and do several stretch and folds.  Let it rest covered for 10-15 minutes and then do another stretch and fold.  Let it rest another 10-15 minutes and do one additional stretch and fold.  After a total of 2 hours place your covered bowl in the refrigerator and let it rest for 12 to 24 hours.  (Since I used my proofer I only let the dough sit out for 1.5 hours before refrigerating).  Note: this is a pretty wet dough so you may need to do a couple of additional stretch and folds.

When you are ready to bake remove the bowl from the refrigerator and let it set out at room temperature still covered for 1.5 to 2 hours.  Remove the dough and shape as desired.

The dough will take 1.5 to 2 hours depending on your room temperature and will only rise about 1/3 it's size at most.  Let the dough dictate when it is read to bake not the clock.

Around 45 minutes before ready to bake, pre-heat your oven to 550 degrees F. and prepare it for steam.  I have a heavy-duty baking pan on the bottom rack of my oven with 1 baking stone on above the pan and one on the top shelf.  I pour 1 cup of boiling water in the pan right after I place the dough in the oven.

Right before you are ready to put them in the oven, score as desired and then add 1 cup of boiling water to your steam pan or follow your own steam procedure.

After 5 minute lower the temperature to 450 degrees.  Bake for 35-50 minutes until the crust is nice and brown and the internal temperature of the bread is 205 degrees.

Take the bread out of the oven when done and let it cool on a bakers rack before for at least 2 hours before eating.

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Bear

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Comments

bbegley's picture
bbegley

Beautiful crumb!  Looks glossy and open.  I'd eat that!

isand66's picture
isand66

Thanks.  It's hard not to like this one.  Quite frankly if you don't like the taste of this bread then you have some serious issues :).  Give it a try.

Regards,
Ian

BobS's picture
BobS

Ian,

I've been meaning to make the Tartine Oat Porridge Bread, but also wanted to fit it into my baking 'system'. Thanks for getting there first; I'm going to try yours instead.

 

Bob

 

Bob

isand66's picture
isand66

Thanks Bob.

I hope you give it a try.  Be warned...this is a very wet dough.  Based on your flour you need to hold back some of the water and add it as needed, but you do want to end up with a wet dough but not soup.

Happy Baking.

Ian

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

fantastic Ian.I will have to give it a go just to see what it tastes like.  I think Lucy will put some potatoes in there too since she always does so when oats are in the mix:-)  Something about potato and oats in bread.  That crust and glossy, open  crumb are just to die for.  Well Done!

Lucy loves the wire haired terrier too  and says Hi to her friends.

Happy Baking 

 

isand66's picture
isand66

Thanks DA.  You would really like this one.  Funny you should mention potatoes.  I will be posting some rolls I made with potatoes and oats which is an offshoot of this formula.

The "wired hair terrier" is actually a bear :).

Happy Baking to you too and look forward to your next bake and cooking display.

Ian

Mebake's picture
Mebake

I like the contrast of the crust against the oat bran. That's a lovely open crumb! good job.

Khalid

isand66's picture
isand66

Thanks Khalid. This version came out even better than the original.  You really should try this one when you get a chance.

Regards,

Ian

gmagmabaking2's picture
gmagmabaking2

That loaf looks wonderful and tasty.  I guess I will have to try some of the Tartine breads... My sister Barb makes it almost daily... I CAN do this!!! At least I can try! LOL

Beautiful baking,

Diane

isand66's picture
isand66

Thanks Diane.  Try this version if you dare....I think it's easier than the original and tastes better in my non-biased opinion :).

Look forward to your next baking adventure.

Regards,
Ian

WoodenSpoon's picture
WoodenSpoon

I was lucky enough to buy a loaf of the Tartine oat porridge bread a few weeks ago and your crumb looks just as nice, if it tastes half as good you'v got a real winner on your hands.

isand66's picture
isand66

Thanks!  Appreciate your kind words.

bakingbadly's picture
bakingbadly

Looks really good, Ian! I'll definitely try the porridge method after I get my hands on rolled oats.

I have to ask, do you think soaking the rolled oats overnight with boiled water will produce the same results? Or is it necessary to cook and cool the rolled oats for same effect? Maybe I'll try both methods and see how they compare.

Keep up the delightful bakes!

Zita

isand66's picture
isand66

Thanks Zita.

I think the cooking method does make a difference, but please do try both and report back.  The method I used with the bulk fermentation in the refrigerator really works great for this formula versus the original version.  Not sure if you have the ability to do this yet for your bakery.

Regards,

Ian

golgi70's picture
golgi70

Looks like you got a more open crumb than the predecessor.  Did the increased acidity improve the flavor of the loaf?  

NIce Bake

Josh

isand66's picture
isand66

Thanks Josh.  I definitely think this version tasted even better than the first.  The added wheat germ helped a little as well.  This one is a keeper and worth trying.

Regards,
Ian

Syd's picture
Syd

Great baking Ian.  That really is a fine looking loaf.  I am absolutely with you on taking a loaf and making it your own.  I do it the whole time, too.  I usually stick to the recipe the first time but after that it's open season on adapting it to fit into my schedule and preferred procedures.

All the best,

Syd

isand66's picture
isand66

Thanks Syd.  That's exactly what I do.

Regards

Ian

varda's picture
varda

and I'm thinking the earthy crunchy market goers might love it.   I think we're going to have to compare gardens.   Everything I see in yours is in mine.   Are you coming northeast?   Hope so.  -Varda

isand66's picture
isand66

Thanks Varda.  I agree that your market goers would definitely like this one and I hope you give it a try one day.

I will be happy to compare gardens with you.  Lisa and I both like to visit the garden nurseries and try new plants each season.  I have a bunch of work to do outside to clear a new area to plant some new perennials this week.

I hope I can get out to visit you at the market this summer.  I'm really looking forward to it and will let you know if I'm planning a trip for sure.

Thanks for checking in.  Hope your market is going well.

Regards,
Ian

hanseata's picture
hanseata

and now in my BreadStorm files.

Hurry, that you don't miss the Plötziade, Ian!

Karin

isand66's picture
isand66

Thanks Karin.  I will try my best to bake something.  I have a few ideas.

Regards,
Ian