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Boule and Pumpernickel for Plotziade 2

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dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Boule and Pumpernickel for Plotziade 2

For the 2nd round of the Bread Olympics we had to use either ancient grains or those that have been lost and replaced by modern hybrid grains but are being brought back by local farmers and millers across the world.  Both are welcomed and noble actions for us bread bakers so it is only logical that we would want to celebrate them both.

 

Organic growing is also a plus in my book as well.  We were lucky enough to find einkorn and a variety of farro from Europe at Whole Foods.  Whole Foods also has a locally sourced program to support local growers and producers with space on their shelves.  It was there I also found locally grown in Arizona, Desert Durum and farro as well - both milled at the resurgent and revived Hayden Mills in Tempe..

 

The real plus for me and Lucy is to find Ramona of Ramona Farms who is a Pima Indian.  Her grandfather and father were both Papago Tohono O’Odham grain growers on their ancestral 10 acre plot ascribed to them on the Tohono O’Odham Pima Indian reservation.  Today Ramona grows 3 different grains on her 10 acre plot and on several other plots that  she is given access to by the tribal folks who have given her permission to farm them.

 

I got some Pima Club and Sonoran White Wheat in whole berries from Ramona Farms.  Both are soft white wheat used to make the best tortillas around but considered too weak in gluten to make a decent loaf of Pale Face bread.  Lucy set out to convert the unbelievers and make a couple of different loaves using the same recipe for the dough and sourdough levain but utilizing different methods to make a ‘Night and Day’ version of this dough.

 

Lucy decided right off to only use these grains and to only use 100% whole grains in both breads with the grains home milled with the exception of the Desert Durham which was 100% whole grains ground at Hayden Mills.  We did sift out the 11% of the hard bits to use to feed the levain in order to get them as wet for as long as possible.

 

We also took a mix of these 6 grains and did 5 things with them.  First we sprouted 100 g  for 4 days to make white and then red malt.  Then we sprouted 200g to make sprouts for the boule version.  Then we scalded 200 g with 20 g of the red malt to put in the pumpernickel loaf version.   Then we ground the berries to make the flour.

 

Lucy wants to pumpernickel everything anyway and this was her chance to bring her German heritage to the Plotziade Olympics.  Few realize that you can DaPumperize any bread and make it taste …..oh so much better!

 

We built the levain on Tuesday and then refrigerated it for 48 hours 1 hour after the 3rd feeding.  It doubled 3 hours after the 1st feeding and doubled 1 hour after the 2nd feeding and then doubled again after being in the fridge. 

 

We autolysed the dough flour for 2 hours as the levain warmed up on the counter.  The dough was divided in half with the soaker water liquid for the sprouts used in the boule and the excess scald water with the red malt was reserved for the pumpernickel.  So this was the only difference between the two breads with the exception of differing baking methods.

 

It's not often that the bottom of the loaf looks better then the top!

Both went through the same slap and folds of 5, 1 and 1 minute on 15 minute intervals and the 3 sets of stretch and folds, from the compass points only on 15 minute intervals.   The add ins for each bread; the sprouts for the boule and the scald for the pumpernickel were added in during the first set of stretch and folds.

Breakfast with the boule

As soon as the S&F‘s were done we pre-shaped and shaped each for the rice floured   basket nsd sprayed tin, bagged and chucked into the fridge for a 12 hour retard.  We have been waiting for more than 2 years to get a thin long tin at Goodwill and, sure enough, last week one presented itself on dollar Thursday! It is like they knew Lucy needed one for the Plotziade Olympics…..Who ever they are …..

 

When we got up in the morning the Fridge Dough Gremlin had struck Again.  A Minneola had fallen from on high and landed on the pumpernickel smashing one end flat as a pancake.  The last time it was honeydew that did the mashing.  Oh well, that is the price Lucy pays for the life she leads.  Thankfully it landed at one end rather than the middle so most or the loaf was un-phased so it was time to steam the heck put of it.

 

We baked the boule first in out usual way with Mega Steam and an oven preheat to 550 F.  The boule was un-molded from the basket onto parchment and peel straight from the fridge.  It was slashed and put into the oven for 15 minutes of steam while turning the oven down to 475 F.  Once the steam came out we turned the oven down to 525 F - convection this time.  15 minutes later it was done reading 205 F on the inside.

 

The boule sprang ok for a 100% whole grain bread with a ton of seeds and it browned nicely too.  It came out kind of rustic an craggy looking which Lucy seems to like very much.  We will have to wait for the crumb shot until the pumpernickel is ready to cut  tomorrow for lunch.

 

Plotziade lunch with pate, tasso, cheese, fruits, melons, pineapple and half an minneola.

The pumpernickel version went into the mini oven tented with foil at 375 F when the pre-heat started for the boule.  After 30 minutes, we turned it down to 350 F for another 30 minutes and after 30 minutes we turned it down to 325 F for 30 minutes more.  By this time the boule was done so we transferred the pumpernickel to Big Old Betsy to finish up the long falling temperature bake per the attached schedule.

Seems every week we have a a special Mexican Dinner with homemade; burrito, sauce, pico, beans, rice and salad. 

375 F - 30 minutes

350 F - 30 minutes

325 F - 30 minutes

300 F – 30 minutes

275 F - 30 minutes

250 F - 1 hour

225 F - 1 hour

200 F - 1 hour

Turn oven off and leave the bread in the oven until morning or 8 hours.

The boule turned out an open crumb that was soft and moist.  But, it is also a very fine tasting whole grain bread.... one of the best I have ever had.  The pumpernickel was easy to cut in 1/4" slices. Open and moist describes it well and the taste is good but not as good as the boule which proves that Lucy's want to pumpernickel everything can be far off the mark.

Home grown heirloom tomatoes are perfect on top of a lamb and brie burger with last Friday's SD bread for a bun.

Plotziade 2 Formula

 

 

 

 

 

 

Build 1

Build 2

 Build 3

Total

%

SD starter

20

0

0

20

1.91%

15% Extract Ancient Grains

30

45

60

135

15.00%

Water

30

45

60

135

15.00%

Total

80

90

120

290

32.22%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

%

 

 

 

Flour

145

13.88%

 

 

 

Water

145

15.64%

 

 

 

Hydration

100.00%

 

 

 

 

Levain % of Total

12.08%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

 

 

Pima Club

150

16.67%

 

 

 

Italian & Hayden Mills Farro

150

16.67%

 

 

 

Kamut

150

16.67%

 

 

 

Einkorn

150

16.67%

 

 

 

HadenMillsDesert Durum

150

16.67%

 

 

 

White Sonoran

150

16.67%

 

 

 

Dough Flour

900

100.00%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Salt

20

1.91%

 

 

 

Water

782

86.89%

 

 

 

Dough Hydration

86.89%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour

1045

 

 

 

 

Water, Soaker & Scald Water,

927

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Whole Grain  %

100.00%

 

 

 

 

Total Weight

2,400

 

 

 

 

Hydration w/ Adds

88.03%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Add - Ins

 

%

 

 

 

Red Malt

6

0.67%

 

 

 

White Malt

2

0.22%

 

 

 

Total Add Ins

8

0.89%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Boule Multigrain Sprouts

 

%

 

 

 

Total Ancient  Sprouts

200

22.22%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pumpernickel Scald

 

%

 

 

 

Total Ancient Seed Scald

200

22.22%

 

 

 

Red Malt

20

0.22%

 

 

 

 

Say happy birthday to Lucy;.  She turned 10 on Tuesday as 2we grinding the grain for this bread and is now, for the first time, older than me in more than 1 way:-) And don't forget that salad. 

And thanks to Mr Lutz at Plotzbog.de for hosting thses great events.  Here is a link http://www.ploetzblog.de/2014/04/21/2-ploetziade-saat-gut-brot/

 

Comments

dosco's picture
dosco

Loaves look good and the salads are making my mouth water as I type.

How did the P2 taste?

Cheers-
Dave

 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

they taste until tomorrow after lunch when we slice them.  Pumpernickel needs at least 24 hour before slicing - but it sure smells great.  The regular loaf should also be better on the sour side after 24 hours.  The salad was terrific.  Nothing like home grown food.  Will let you know more tomorrow,

isand66's picture
isand66

First...Happy, Happy Birthday to my favorite Brownman, LUCY!  She doesn't look a day over 2 :).  Max and Lexi send their love!

Secondly, these latest look and sound fantastic and I can't wait to see and hear how the crumb comes out.

Way to go Lucy!

P.S. those tomatoes look awesome....I have to wait a few months before mine will be ready.  Last year was the worse crop ever, so hopefully we will have better luck this time.  I planted around 19 plants with all different varieties plus come cukes, peppers a cantaloupe and a watermelon plant.

Regards,
Ian

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Purple fort he royalty she truly is.  Last year the heirloom tomatoes were a complete bust but this year they are better,  The 100 sweet cherry tomato has been a stellar producer over the winter - getting close to 2,500 of them off one plant.

Sounds like you have a fine veggie garden in the works.  I think Lucy has a winner on her paws but wom't know for sure until tomorrow.  The pumpernickel smells killer enough on its own.  Let you know more tomorrow,

 

bakingbadly's picture
bakingbadly

Mmmm, DaPumperized bread. You can always count on it to be flavour-packed. Your lunch and Mexican dinner looks just as appetizing. You're quite the cook!

Also, a happy birthday to Lucy---possibly the best bread-making assistant ever. :)

Zita

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

but Lucy is the about the best Baking Apprentice 2nd Class in the county.... if you don't count most of the other ones :-)

Glad you like the food and will update you one the bread tomorrow..

Darwin's picture
Darwin

and way too complex for me to try.  The crust looks soooo good, congrats.  Every now and then I can get black tomatoes, they are soo good.  Poor Lucy looks tired after all that baking and celebrating.  :)

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Russian Black and another black variety to go with the yellow tomatoes which turned out orange when they were ripe and not yellow - all from seed.  the black tomatoes are the best ones I have ever eaten.  Just delicious..  Can't wait to cut the bread for lunch today.  I unwrapped them this morning just to smell them:-)

Doing two at once is a bit of challenge but they are not hard.  You can buy the malt.  Just weigh out the grains and grind them.  Sift out the hard bits and feed that to the levain.  Soak some grain for 3 hours and then put them in the sprouter for 2 days and water them once or twice a day.  Take some more grain and red malt and simmer it for 20 minutes and then let sit in the liquid for 24 hours in the fridge.  Then just make the bread and incorporate the add ins on the first stretch and fold.  Bake on pumpernickel style.  Next thing you know you have two very different breads all from the same dough.

You would love these tomatoes Darwin.

Mebake's picture
Mebake

Nice work, minus the gremlin minelota :) The boule looks great. Hmm, mexican food! Now you hot me hungry , DA. The crust color on your breads are so attractive. 

Thanks for sharing this, DA !

Khalid

 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

I was shocked when I took off the foil cover of the pumpernickel and took it out of the pan to dry it out upside down ion the oven rack for the last 30 minutes of baking.  It was so much lighter than the boule in color.  No wonder they put so much malt syrup, molasses, caramel (or anything sugar)  etc in pumpernickel to get it so dark.

The crust of the boule was very crusty when it came out but it softened as it cooled  I'm not sure why the crusts come out so attractive other than Lucy usually specifies red and white malt which make more sugar available and the red does color the crust as well as flavor it ?

Glad you liked the bread and Happy Baking Khalid. - good luck at the next market  

gmabaking's picture
gmabaking

She owns Ploetziade 2 and all the bragging rights due. What a lucky person you are to enjoy the advice and company of royalty. Lucy made some amazing bread again, on a par with the beautiful meals too. The pictures are lovely and the house must have smelled like her hometown bakery. Everything looks so good.

I am encouraged to see that you are having a good garden too. Last year my tomato plants were green and lovely but pretty much barren. Maybe they chose to keep their girlish figures by remaining childless. I'm going to try the technique of letting some indeterminates sprawl on straw this year and see if that works. I remember seeing that in Kansas, the yield was amazing. It is messy looking and probably not one the neighbors would appreciate or admire. Another advantage of living in the country. For tomatoes though, I think I could make a patch in the middle of the lawn and be happy. Luckily though I have an old garden that is pretty much out of sight.

Enjoy your garden and baking!

Barbra

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

When we first moved to Gilbert and it was a very small town - the roads weren't even paved and you could ride your horse downtown and tie up at the Brass Rail Saloon - for some air conditioned indoor horse shoe pitching and a brew or two. a local farmer planted tomatoes in a field, no straw and just let them sprawl all over the ground where ever they decided to sprawl.  We loved going there a wading into the plants and picking fresh tomatoes.  We moved here from Scottsdale which was just too big - now Gilbert has 250,00 residents and you can't ride your horse anywhere in town.   I think your tomato idea will bear good fruit!  My wife wonl' let me plant citrus or veggies in pots in the front yard for some reason.

I plant tomatoes in pots and just let them go where ever.  I tried staking this one but it fell over anyway so no more staking as this has been the best producing tomato plant of all time - its almost dead now.... the 100 F's are here to stay it seems.......But Lucy sees fine tomatoes in your future!  She is a treat to bake with and the best little bread formula guru.  She only eats 2/3rds of a cup of food a day and only want her tummy rubbed as reward.

Glad you liked the bread and

Happy Baking Barbra

hanseata's picture
hanseata

What great looking breads!

I just posted mine - unfortunately there are no such appetizing tomatoes to go with it in Maine.

But at least I can feast my eyes at the longest street fresh market in Europe (Isemarkt in Hamburg) and enjoy the seasonal freshly cut white asparagus from the heath that is served everywhere.

Karin

 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Found it from your link on Ploetzblog.  Have fun in Hamburg and cooking with your Mom. 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

They almost look machine made!  Bet they taste pretty good with some sausage and cheese.  I sent off this one to Mr Lutz on Saturday.  These are  fun challenges.  The street market in Hamburg sounds terrific and I bet you could sell your bread and crackers there - no problem.  W only get white asparagus in cans and jars here - still pretty good but fresh would be the best.  These Black Russian tomatoes are killer and the success at growing them after last years failure makes them special.

Glad you like the breads Karin - they taste as good as one of them looks :-)

Happy baking. 

hanseata's picture
hanseata

Lucy achieved a great crust! Amazing what those German Dackels are able to do :) 

Fresh cut white asparagus is a big seasonal favorite in Germany, you get it everywhere. I had it yesterday again, grilled with mountain cheese and wild garlic, in a funny restaurant called "Honey-Do", run by an American in Göppingen where my husband spent part of army brat childhood.

Yes, the street market in Hamburg is spectacular, it's always a must see, when I am visiting.

Happy baking, and let's hope there will be another Plötziade, though it might take a while.

Karin