The Fresh Loaf

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50 Percent Whole Multi-grain Sourdough

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dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

50 Percent Whole Multi-grain Sourdough

We have been working our way up the whole multigrain SD ladder for some tike starting at 12% and now this one is 50%.  50% is the minimum whole grain we would like to eat as our daily bread for all kinds of personal health reasons. Plus it tastes so much better than white bread in Lucy’s book as well as mine.

 

Normally this breads would have all kinds of seeds, soakers, scalds, nuts, sprouts and fruits as add ins but the size of the holes in the crumb suffers as a result.  So this time we cut out all the bits inside and went with flour all by itself except for a bit of honey to cut the bitterness and some VW to get the low protein AP flour up to bread flour levels and help with the low gluten whole grains.

 

We hoped the holes would remain decent in size along with the SD tang, great multigrain taste and soft, moist crumb – with no Tang Zhong required.  We decided to up the hydration substantially for this bread to help keep the holes on the larger size while realizing that this might make for some serious ‘bread spread’.

 

The levain was made with all whole grains using a 66% hydration multigrain seed that had been in the fridge for 3 weeks.  It was built over 3 stages before being refrigerated for 24 hours to bring out the sour. 

 

We autolysed everything but the salt for 30 minutes and put the salt on top of the dough ball so it wouldn’t be forgotten.  We did 3 sets slap and folds of 6, 2 and 1 minute before doing 4 sets of s& F’s on 30 minute intervals.  We then immediately refrigerated the dough in bulk for 8 hours.

 

The next morning we took the dough out of the cold and put it on a heating pad for 1 1/2 hours to warm up before being shaped an placed into a rice floured basket.  After 2 hours we got Big Old Betsy ready  with a 550 F preheat and we refrigerated the dough again as the oven heated to try to get the skin cold enough to slash – it was pretty wobbly and close to 95% proofed.

 

Yes iit is a Mexican Winter Squash Pie - makes pumpkin so passe:-)

As we thought, the dough refused to be slashed and partially collapsed under the single edge razor but we slid it onto the bottom stone with high hopes that it would recover under the mega steam supplied by lava rocks in a 9x13 Pyrex pan half full of water.

 

And an Exploding Lemon Chocolate Cheesecake Souffle!

  We turned the oven down 25 degrees on 2 minute intervals until we got to 475 F and left it there for 6 minutes giving the dough a 12 minute steam bath.  The steam came out and we turned the oven down to 425 F convection this time, for another 10 minutes when the boule read 208 F on the inside and deemed done.  We did rotate the bread 180 degrees after 5 of those minutes.

 

This bread made a great balogna sandwich for lunch and then a fine chicken, grilled cheese the next day - with the usual veggie and fruit variety.

The bread browned nicely with small blisters, sprang back nicely and blooms a bit.  What it did best is spread.  This was ‘one wet dough’, no amount of cold could get it to keep from oozing once unchained from the basket.   Still, the crumb as open for 50% while grain bread and we were pleased but not as open as the 30% whole grain version – no surprise there.  We like this bread a lot.  It was very soft and moist on the inside with a chewy soft crust as it cooled.

 

Lucy never forgets a good salad for lunch and dinner.

Has to be one the best SFSD style bread we have managed and it tastes about as good as it this kind of bread gets.  I can see some bruschetta in our near future to go with some Italian gravy on Sunday.

Formula

 

 

Build 1

Build 2

 Build 3

Total

%

Multigrain SD Starter

20

0

0

20

3.65%

Whole Spelt

6

6

6

18

3.28%

Whole Kamut

6

6

6

18

3.28%

Whole Farro

6

6

6

18

3.28%

Whole Wheat

12

12

12

36

6.57%

Whole Rye

6

6

6

18

3.28%

Water

36

36

36

108

19.71%

Total

92

72

72

236

43.07%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Multigrain SD Levain

 

%

 

 

 

Whole Multi-grain Mix

118

21.53%

 

 

 

Water

118

21.53%

 

 

 

Hydration

100.00%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Levain % of Total

21.81%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

 

 

AP

274

50.00%

 

 

 

Whole Wheat

52

9.49%

 

 

 

Whole Spelt

26

4.74%

 

 

 

Whole Kamut

26

4.74%

 

 

 

Dark Rye

26

4.74%

 

 

 

Whole Farro

26

4.74%

 

 

 

Dough Flour

430

78.47%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Salt

11

2.01%

 

 

 

Water

375

68.43%

 

 

 

Dough Hydration

87.21%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour

548

100.00%

 

 

 

Water

493

89.96%

 

 

 

Hydration w/ Adds

89.43%

 

 

 

 

% Whole Grain

50.00%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Weight

1,082

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Add - Ins

 

%

 

 

 

Honey

15

2.74%

 

 

 

VW Gluten

15

2.74%

 

 

 

Total

30

5.47%

 

 

 

 

Comments

Mebake's picture
Mebake

This is one hole-ly crumb for 50% wholegrains. Love the look of the bread inside out. The souffle looks funny though, but i bet it tastes great. Never done a baked souffle.. One day.

The pie looks delicious. I've done tarts and pies yesterday. I'll post about it soon.

Happy baking, DA!

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

crumb and it tastes great.  We used it for dipping in olive oil. balsamic, basil, cracked  and grated Parmesan, while the forgotten rice was cooking away to go with the tuna.  Just delicious.  We could make this our everyday bread easy enough.  The hydration was a little on the high side but maybe the holes and softness would suffer some if it was lower?

That Mexican Squash pie is delicious as is the Lemon Cheese souffle.  The problem with the souffle is that I forgot spray the pan with non stick so the batter closest to the pan stuck before the egg whites exploded causing the souffle to double in height and rip itself all around the perimeter where it stuck to the pan.  Never forget to spray your pan when making this souffle.  But it is worse.  Here is a picture of the cooled souffle where it sunk back to its normal level and then cracked across the middle at the same time!  Oh well, next time we will spray the pan.

Can't wait to see your pies adn tarts!

isand66's picture
isand66

This looks like a wonderful bread DA.  Your crumb looks perfect for this amount of whole grains and the crust is perfect.

The only thing I would suggest to you is to use a stronger protein bread flour instead of the AP flour and leave out the VW Gluten.  I have never used VW gluten before and when making a similar bread to this one I have used either bread flour or KAF French style or European style which has a higher protein and ash content than regular AP flour.  Obviously you can tinker with the water amount if you also want the spreading to be more manageable.  Just a few suggestions, but all in all this looks like and as you said tastes fantastic.

I was traveling a few days this week so I have not had a chance to bake anything at all and I'm just about through the last 2 bakes bread.  I have to build up a levain to hopefully bake something tomorrow or Monday.

Happy Baking DA.

Ian

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

AP flour of VWG that caused the spread.  I used my LaFama 13% protein AP flour for this bread plus the VWG of the all the whole grains but, the near 90% hydration was just too high for a 50% whole grain bread.   It should have been around 85%.  I could feel it in the dough.  The gluten was properly developed but the dough slumped a few minutes after shaping it into a ball.

I figured that the retard would firm it up some more and that refrigerating it again for 45 minutes right before slashing would help it keep its shape - but we figured wrong and it still spread  Next time, 85% water will do the trick - and there will be a next time since this bread was such a good one.  Plus it was way over proofed too!

It's not as tasty or healthy as one with toadies, a whole berry scald or sprouts but it doesn't have bits in the crumb either and these bits will hold back the holes some and make the crumb less soft. It is one of the best breads we have managed to date and will shine as bruschetta tonight.

Can't wait to see your next bake Ian!

Happy Baking

PMcCool's picture
PMcCool

And don't worry about the cracking of the souffle.  Cracks, like holes, don't introduce any off flavors; whether in breads or souffles.

Paul

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

taste good, even with the cracks,your theory is still intact.   I have notices the holes in bread don't taste like much either. 

The bread is one of our new favorites.... until we bake the next one and cutback on the water some!  Very tasty indeed. 

Happy Baking Paul!