The Fresh Loaf

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Everyday Multigrain Sourdough with Scald

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dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Everyday Multigrain Sourdough with Scald

We’ve been working on an everyday white bread that has at least 25% whole grain flour.  This bread would need a soaker, scald or sprouted whole grain berries inside it to give the crumb some chew.  It would need some potato and oat in the mix since we love what they do for the rise. 

 

It would need to include some ground flax, sesame seeds and Toadies to give the crumb some healthy flecks of color and more flavor.  Including the Toadies we would want the bread to be over 40% whole grains

 

This bread is a variation of that theme using yogurt whey water for the majority of the dough liquid to give the already tangy SD even more pucker.  We went all out to get sour out of this bread by using a week old refrigerated 66% hydration, 50-50 mix, totaling 20 g, of our whole grain rye and whole wheat SD starters.

 

The levain was also retarded for 24 hours - 1 hour after the 3rd build feeding to enhance the sour of the levain.  All of the whole grain flours were in the levain to allow them the most time to be wet and get soft.

  

We simmered the scald for 20 minutes before allowing it to sit undisturbed on the counter for 6 hours.  The autolyse was 2 hours in length and included everything except the levain and the scald.   Once the autolyse met the levain it was at 77% hydration.  we did 10 minutes of slap and folds and 3 sets of S&F’s 20 minutes apart. 

  

We incorporated the large whole berry scald in the first set of S& F’s.  After completion of the last S&F, we allowed the dough to ferment on the counter in an oiled bowl for 30 minutes before going into the fridge for a 16 hour retard.

 

It more than doubled in the fridge.  After 15 minutes of warm up the next morning, we shaped the dough into a boule and put it into a lightly rice floured basket to final proof inside a used trash can liner.  After 1 ½ hours of final proof we fired up Big Old Betsy to 500 F.  This loaf was too big for the mini oven.

 

Once the oven hit 350 F we put (2) of Sylvia’s steaming pans and (1) 12” CI skillet full of lava rocks into the bottom of the oven to supply mega steam.   After Betsy said she was at temperature, we waited 15 more minutes to allow the top and bottom stone to get to temperature.

 

 We un-molded the bread from the basket onto a peel covered in parchment.  We slashed the boule T-Rex style with a pairing knife and slid it onto the bottom stone.  We turned the oven down to 450 F after 3 minutes and continued to steam for another 12 minutes.

 

At that point the steam came out and we turned the oven down to 425 F, convection.  After rotating the bread every 5 minutes 90 degrees on the stone to promote even browning, in 20 more minutes the bread was 203 F on the inside when we turned off the oven.  Baking time was 35 minutes total.  When the bread hit 205 F we cracked open the oven door and let the bread sit on the stone to crisp the crust for another 5 minutes.  The boule eventually hit  207 F after the 5 minute crisp and then we removed it to a cooling rack.

 

It browned up, sprang and bloomed nicely.  It s a quite handsome boule - if there is such a thing.  It sure smelled earthy and deliciously wheaty coming out of the oven and it had that tinge of semolina color on the crust.  No blisters but it wasn’t baked in the min oven either where blisters are common.

 

The crumb turned out as expected; open ,soft and moist with some gloss.  No one will ever ask "is this a sourdough bread?'  They will know it is a SD without question.  This is the kind of pucker we look for and hope it only gets better tomorrow.  Our most distinctly sour breads come from this metho of handling starter, levain and dough retarding  processes and using yogurt whey water for half the dough liquid.  This bread is the one you want for you everyday sourdough sandwich bread.  It is delicious, hearty, healthy and satisfying.

Breakfast  and lunch on bake day.  White DaPumpernickel for breakfast and this everyday bread for lunch.

 

Formula

WW and RyeSD

Build 1

Build 2

 Build 3

Total

%

WW & Rye  SD Starter

20

0

0

20

3.84%

Rye

6

6

6

18

3.45%

Farro

6

6

6

18

3.45%

WW

6

6

6

18

3.45%

Barley

6

6

6

18

3.45%

Spelt

6

6

6

18

3.45%

Water

40

40

0

80

15.36%

Total

90

70

30

190

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

WW and RyeSD Levain

 

%

 

 

 

Flour

130

24.95%

 

 

 

Water

90

17.27%

 

 

 

Hydration

69.23%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Levain % of Total

20.60%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

 

 

Potato Flakes

16

3.07%

 

 

 

AP

325

62.38%

 

 

 

Dough Flour

391

75.05%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Salt

10

1.92%

 

 

 

Whey 200 water 120

320

61.42%

 

 

 

Dough Hydration

81.84%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour

521

100.00%

 

 

 

Whey 200 and Water 210

410

 

 

 

 

T. Dough Hydration

78.69%

 

 

 

 

% Whole Grain Flour

25.95%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

% Whole Grain w/ Toadies & Scald

42.11%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hydration w/ Adds

76.64%

 

 

 

 

Total Weight

1,068

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Add - Ins

 

%

 

 

 

Red Rye Malt

2

0.38%

 

 

 

Ground Flax & Sesame Seeds

13

2.50%

 

 

 

Toadies

7

1.34%

 

 

 

VW Gluten

5

0.96%

 

 

 

Total

27

5.18%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Scald

 

%

 

 

 

WW Berries

20

3.84%

 

 

 

Rye Berries

20

3.84%

 

 

 

Barley

20

3.84%

 

 

 

Farro

20

3.84%

 

 

 

Spelt Berrries

20

3.84%

 

 

 

Total Scald

100

19.19%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Scald is the dry weight.

 

 

 

 

 

Comments

Song Of The Baker's picture
Song Of The Baker

Hey man.  a little more tame today :). One of the nicest boules i've seen you post.  Good job on the slash and bloom as well.

I can't find spelt berries.  Where do you pick up your grains etc. from down there?

John

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

I get my grains from the Whole Foods bins except for Whole wheat which i get in Winco's bins.   I also get white rye and white spelt flour out of the bins at Winco.  Winco is a grocery chain out of the Pacific NW so you might find some close by but across the border?

We like Ian's T-Rex slash.   You are right nothing fancy this time.   We needed some white bread and this is a good one. 

Happy baking

Song Of The Baker's picture
Song Of The Baker

I discovered Winco when visiting down in AZ.  It's a great place to shop.  Better than Walmart.

We have one about 15 minutes across the border here.  About 30 minutes away from my home.  We plan to hit there soon to find some of the US goodies we liked while down there and can't find up here.

Happy baking.

John

isand66's picture
isand66

Nice Bake DA...I love the look of that nice moist and soft crumb and can envision the nice sour flavor as you described.  Bet that will make some nice grilled bread with some olive oil and fresh mozzarella.

Enjoy and have a great weekend.

Ian

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

for tonight's dinner since we always have left over olives from a pizza bake.  I like grilling one side flipping them and covering the toasted side with mozzarella while the other side toasts and then putting the vinegary veggies on top.

You hit the nail Ian.  The crumb is very, very nice - everything Lucy hopes for!    It was distinctly sour yesterday but even more so today for breakfast toast - covered with a grilled salmon and cream cheese mix.  Delicious as half a bagel!

Have a great weekend back at ya.

Wingnut's picture
Wingnut

Another great bake.

Cheers,

Wingnut

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

recipes where if you grind the multigrains in bulk and freeze it, make your own yogurt and freeze the whey, you are half way there all the time:-)  Glad you liked it Wing

Sorry the site lost the original comment.

Mebake's picture
Mebake

Lovely everyday bread, DA, as usual.

Isn't farro an italian name for spelt?

-Khalid

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Khalid.  It is terrific!  The Italians really messed up the word world for the rest of us with their various Farro definitions.  Depending on where you are in Italy, farro is used for 3 different grains;  einkorn, emmer and spelt.  Depending on the length of the grain with spelt being the longest and einkorn being the shortest, some Italians are more specific with designations as: farro piccolo, farro medio, and farro grande,respectively.  Some Italians also say that Emmer is 'true farro'. My apprentice's joke is since emmer was found in the tombs of Pharaohs that is why it is called 'true farro' :-)

Hqppy baking Khalid

 

evonlim's picture
evonlim

Me too, love a daily bread as such with multigrains and distinctive sour.. You really hit it right topped with grilled salmon and cream cheese. I would add a little blue cheese and capers to get sour and a dose of smelly cheesy bite!
Satisfying to see such a wonderful homemade bread. Can't buy it anywhere !
Just curious, potato flakes is that the instant mash?
Evon

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

that you just can't find the kind of bread we make at the story or even a bakery because many won't spend the 3 days to make it and the cost to put in all the ingredients.  Plus, you wo'lt find the sour we work so hard to get - not that this bread is hard to make.  If it was i wouldn't do it and Lucy would run away from her master :-)  Yes, smelly cheeses would be good with this bread. 

I use instant mashed potato flakes because they are cheap, effort free, tasty and much easier to get the hydration right when adding them to the dough.  I just weigh them out and use the same hydration I am using for the rest of the flour.  A baking potato made in the microwave would be my second choice .  Then I don't; add any extra water to the dough to account for it since the MW potato has the right amount of water anyway after it is nuked.  The is something about oats and potato that make the crumb softer and the dough rise better.

You would like this everyday sour bread Evon..

Happy baking

evonlim's picture
evonlim

thanks for your detailed explanation.. learnt somrthing new, yeah i have new ingredients to play with :)

evon

gmagmabaking2's picture
gmagmabaking2

That is a very nice :"everyday" bread... as usual it is a meal in itself... you pair it with such good looking goodies.  Very, very well done and beautimous!

Diane

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

This one iis less of a meal than some but it is more sour than most!  Glad you like it.  When the meal looks good and has a lot of colorful variety, it always seems to taste better.  In my next life I am going to be very thin, in shape younger, a food designer/presenter and beautimous :-)

Thanks for the kind words and Happy Baking

PiPs's picture
PiPs

Stunning crumb DA,

... but everyday? ... Not to make I hope ... There is some serious effort and diligence in that baking ...

cheers, Phil 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

on this bread as well as the sour were exceptional.   i say the yogurt whey had something to do with both,  Now that I am only baking a loaf of bread on Friday the organization required isn't too difficult.  We keep toasted ground flax and sesame seeds, Toadies, red and white malts and all the other nuts and seeds in the freezer ready to go.  I keep a multigrain mix of milled whole flours for the levain build which we start on Wednesday morning and by noon we are refrigerating it 1 hour after the 3rd feeding for its 24 hour retard.  Thee next day we get the levain out of the fridge at noon for its 2 hours of warming up and to finish its 3rd doubling.  We get the dough flour autolyse going as soon as the levain comes out of the fridge Thursday morning if it is white flour but if whole grain flour we autolyse overnight ,  If we are using yogurt or cheese whey for the liquid we get it out of the freezer the day belfor so it can thaw out.   By 4 PM Thursday the dough is being retarded in the fridge for its 16 hour cold spell.  Its basically 15 minutes fo worka dn hurs of wating and then repeat until finished

If everything  if made and in the freezer it isn't at all strenuous or difficult to make this bread.  Usually stuff needs to be replenished at different times because they run out on their own schedule as they are used.  But this week everything ran out out at once.  So we have started the rye and barley sprouting for the malts yesterday to make on Wednesday and will make the Toadies and toasted ground flax and sesame seeds on Monday and Tuesday.

When you are retired you can have every bread take 3 days to make and spend the other 4 days......getting ready to make it ::-)  You can end up with some fairly interesting breads that way.  Glad you like the bread Phil and

Happy baking