The Fresh Loaf

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Multigrain Sourdough with Scald, Seeds and 3 Nuts

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dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Multigrain Sourdough with Scald, Seeds and 3 Nuts

We are now officially on the summer baking schedule.  No more large loaves.  Only 1 small one or possibly 2 if baked on the same day.  All bred baking is done in the mini oven outside.   This particular bake came in at over 1,300 g so it will have to be baked as 2 loaves one after the other to fit the mini oven.  Lucy isn’t quick with basic math.

 

My apprentice quickly forgets just about everything and the size of a loaf that fits in the MO is something she never knew to begin with - like every thing else worth knowing.   I have noticed that she is really good at hunting geckos, eating them and then upchucking the gooey mess on your summer bare feet.  Amazing really…. so don’t think you can catch a gecko with your bare teeth like she can.

 

This bread is what I would call our almost everyday bread that we would like to eat if we ever made the same bread more than once and had a favorite one dominating our bake list.  Thankfully, my apprentice forgets what that last bake was much less what her favorite might be other than knowing DaPumperizing any bread is way better than not doing so.

 

.The only thing missing is a dried fruit, I had a variety of them laid out and ready to be included but Lucy forgot all about them.  When I asked, she said that with the molasses and honey already in the mix, the sweetness of the fruits wasn’t needed.  Odd how these recipes come together especially after traversing torturously through such a tiny brain as hers.

 

We were going for multi grain sour so we used 10 g each of our rye and whole wheat starters and used all the whole grains in the 3 stage levain.  The whole grains ended up at 36% if you do not include the wholegrain soaker and the levain was 20% of the total weight.  We like to use a larger levain when making a bread that is jam packed full of add ins.

 

We refrigerated the levain for 24 hours after it had risen 25% after the 3rd stage feeding to increase the sour.  It rose another 25% in the fridge before being warmed up and allowed to finish its 3 stage doubling the next morning.  The whole grains in the levain included, barley, farro, spelt, wheat, and  rye.  Lucy tries to keep the whole grains in the levain so they have a really good chance of softening up as much as possible.

 

We added some corn, oats and potato to the AP dough flour because we like the flavors they bring to the party.  We scalded; whole wheat, rye, barley, farro, and spelt berries before putting them in the fridge overnight to soak and soften up.  They were well drained before being added to the dough.

 

The add ins included home made red and white malt, honey, molasses, ground flax and ground sesame seeds, pumpkin seeds, sunflower seeds and pistachios,. We tossed in some Toadies since they are nearly required to enhance the flavor of every bake and a little VWG to bring up the gluten to an acceptable level .

Bake day breakfast.

The autolyse included everything except the pumpkinseeds, sunflower seeds, pistachio nuts and the whole berry scald.   The autolyse was done while the levain warmed up and finished doubling in the morning - about 3 hours.

 

Once the levain and the autolyse came together we did 10 minutes of slap and folds to develop the gluten and then let it rest for 15 minutes in an covered and oiled bowl.  We did 3 sets of S&F’s on 15 minute intervals where the scald and remaining seeds and nuts were incorporated on the first one and thoroughly distributed by the third set.  After a 1 hour ferment on the counter, into the fridge it went for its 16 hour bulk retard.

 

After taking the dough out of the fridge we divided it in half and then refrigerated half.  This way we could maintain a time window of 45 minutes between the 2 loaves.  This accounted for one loaf to bake off, the oven come back to temperature with steam in place and be oven be ready just in time for the 2nd loaf.

 

We shaped the dough cold into small ovals and for a little excitement, the first one we proofed seam side down so it would bake seam side up without slashing and the 2nd one we placed seam side up and slashed it.  The bread was ready to into the oven 2 1/2 hours after coming out of the fridge.

 

The mini oven was pre heated to 500 F and (2) of Sylvia’s steaming Pyrex cups, half full of water with a dish rag in each, were heated in the microwave.  We overturned the bread cross wise onto the top of the vented broiler pan covered in parchment paper.  The bottom of the broiler pan was preheated in the mini oven.

 

This bread made a fine balogna and brie sandwich with veggies, fruits and cheese.

A half a cup of water was put in the bottom of the broiler pan right before the broiler top, with the bread and steaming cups was placed on top of it.  The small space where the bread takes up 25% of it and the mega steam applied usually makes the mini put crust on bread like a commercial bakery oven.   Our best breads have always come the mini oven.

 

How did that stir fry from last night's dinner get in there? 

Once the bread went in, we steamed for 2 minutes and then turned the oven down to 450 F for 13 more minutes.  At the 15 minute mark, the bottom of the broiler pan came out with Sylvia’s steaming cups and the bread was left to bake on the top of the broiler pan at 400 F, convection this time.

We turned the bread 180 degrees every 5 minutes and flipped itnover on the top for the last 10 minutes of baking to get the bottom as brown as the top 20 minutes after the steam came out the bread tested 205 F on the inside at 35 minutes total baking time. 

Once removed to the cooling rack we noticed that the bread had not cracked mightily along the seam as we thought it would.  It wasn’t a lack of steam, possibly 98% proofed?   It did brown nicely, was crunchy with very small blisters and it smelled great.

The 2nd loaf was slashed before it went in the mini oven and baked the same way. It to did not spring or bloom much and did not bake as dark on the outside.  It too softened a little as it cooled but the crust was still crunchy and very tasty. 

With the crumb not as open as our usual, maybe the bread was under proofed?   The crumb was soft and moist like always.   Maybe there was just so much stuff in this bread it had a hard time getting lift?  Usually we would put YW in these kinds of breads to open the crumb and probably should have this time.  It passed the poke test and it looked like it had nearly doubled though.

The great thing about this bread is that it is a fine tasting bread.  My daughter said this is the only bread I should make.  The flour mix, corn, potato, scald, Toadies, ground flax and sesame seed, pistachios pumpkin and sunflower seeds really make this a tasty treat.

Formula

WW and RyeSD

Build 1

Build 2

 Build 3

Total

%

WW & Rye  SD Starter

20

0

0

20

3.66%

Rye

4

8

18

30

5.49%

Farro

4

8

18

30

5.49%

WW

4

8

18

30

5.49%

Barley

4

8

18

30

5.49%

Spelt

4

8

18

30

5.49%

Water

20

40

40

100

18.32%

Total

60

80

130

270

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

WW and RyeSD

 

%

 

 

 

Flour

160

29.30%

 

 

 

Water

110

20.15%

 

 

 

Hydration

68.75%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Levain % of Total

20.47%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

 

 

Corn Meal

12

2.20%

 

 

 

Rolled Oats

12

2.20%

 

 

 

Potato Flakes

12

2.20%

 

 

 

AP

350

64.10%

 

 

 

Dough Flour

386

70.70%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Salt

10

1.83%

 

 

 

Water

310

56.78%

 

 

 

Dough Hydration

80.31%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour

546

100.00%

 

 

 

Water

420

 

 

 

 

T. Dough Hydration

76.92%

 

 

 

 

Whole Grain %

35.90%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hydration w/ Adds

74.91%

 

 

 

 

Total Weight

1,319

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Add - Ins

 

%

 

 

 

Red Rye Malt

3

0.55%

 

 

 

White Rye Malt

3

0.55%

 

 

 

Honey & Molasses

20

3.66%

 

 

 

Pumpkin 30, Sunflower 30 & Pistachio 50

110

20.15%

 

 

 

Ground Flax & Sesame Seeds

20

3.66%

 

 

 

Hemp & Chia Seeds

40

7.33%

 

 

 

Toadies

12

2.20%

 

 

 

VW Gluten

10

1.83%

 

 

 

Total

218

39.93%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Scald

 

%

 

 

 

WW Berries

25

4.58%

 

 

 

Rye Berries

25

4.58%

 

 

 

Barley

25

4.58%

 

 

 

Farro

25

4.58%

 

 

 

Spelt Berrries

25

4.58%

 

 

 

Total Scald

125

22.89%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Scald is the dry weight.

 

 

 

 

 

Dough weighed 1,400 g with wet scald

 

 

 

 

 

Bread weighed 622 g each after baking

 

 

 

 

 

Comments

isand66's picture
isand66

That bread looks chock full of goodness.  I would say if anything maybe the bread was over-proofed but it still looks and sounds like it came out nice and tasty.  I like the combo of ingredients in this one.  Curious why you used honey and molasses as I usually would only use one sweetener.  Do you feel by using both it contributed to the final outcome?

anyway..another excellent bake..tell Lucy to lay off the Geckos...your car insurance rates may go up now :)

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

by going through the photos.  In the summer I usually retard the dough 30 minutes after the last S&F because it is so hot here.   I forgot it was sitting on the counter and it was there for an hour and a half, the same time I leave it there in the winter.  So it more than tripled in the fridge by the looks of teh photos.  I think it just pooped itself out when trying to final proof after such a strong showing in the fridge.

 

There isn't  lot of sweetener total but I do like the taste of molasses in darker breads.  You can't taste either in the bread so they can be left out completely and usually,  I don't put either in the mix.  This is fine tasting bread and you would like it.

Your apprentices would have a field day with the geckos :-)

Glad you liked the post Ian

Happy baking

 

kenlklaser's picture
kenlklaser

What is YW? ("Usually we would put YW in these kinds of breads to open the crumb")

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Yeast water is another from of natural yeast, captured from the skins of fresh fruit., that can be cultivated like a SD starter.  The difference is that you never get any sour from yeast water.  So it is a natural replacement for any recipe that calls for commercial yeast or where SD tang is not wanted.  This is my favorite time of year for YW since it is cherry season.  This YW was originally started with Minneola's, then converted to apple and now has minneola, apple and cherries which gives it it beautiful color,  It has a way of opening up the crumb of breads that are full of stuff like this one,

Happy baking

 

isand66's picture
isand66

Yeast Water is what DA is referring to.

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

I think I see a perfect little sprout coming out of the wheat grain...now you have even more veggies to go with those delicious looking veggie and fruit plates.

I have been so happy with my new little mini oven...on a really hot day I may just plug it in and bake using your cup O wet dishrag method.. outside, too.

Sylvia

 

 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

on teh TFL and the one we bake in for the summer.  We haven't used it for baking for several months and when we fired it up for the 500 F preheat it was smoking pretty good from the toast crumbs :-)  The mini oven makes the best bread out of out two options.  It sure saves on the electric bill.  If I used it all the time to make smaller loaves, maybe i wouldn't have so much bread in the freezer!

We love fruits and veggies to go with our toast and sandwiches.  So tasty, healthy and beautiful too!

It is amazing how much steams comes out of those little cups too!  You have changed the bread baking mini oven world too!

Happy baking Sylvia.  I envision a pide coming out of your WFO :-)

FlourChild's picture
FlourChild

Love it in all its nubby, seedy glory!  I make so many "plain" breads, you inspire me to try a few filled with "stuff".

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

at least the girls do.  For those we bake variations of David Snyder's SJ, SFSD and Pugliese.  My daughter is finally coming around to liking full of stuff breads.  We like breads that are half full of stuff.  We like then white brown or black.  Variety is one of the great things about bread baking and the different tastes that come out of the oven is really staggering.  Today's breakfast was a slice of Altamura Semolina, this bread and a very nice pumpernickel all toasted  with butter and raspberry jam, an egg and mixed fruit.

It is fun to make and eat all the different varieties plus I make sure my apprentice gets a well rounded baking experience and knows there is more to bread than Dapumperizing!

Happy baking FlourChild

 

varda's picture
varda

and as usual my head is spinning from your process and ingredient list.   Please remind me about that mini oven?   What is it?   Where did you get it?   Etc.   I fear searching through your posts.   Might get lost.    Thanks so much.  -Varda

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Mini Oven that I paid $99 for - less than 3 years ago.  It has broil, bake, convection, toaster, reheat, bagel...etc.  I would tell you the model number but it has a blueberry cheese cake in it right now with 30 minutes to go.  It has a 9"x12x12 space to bake in and can go from 150 F to 500 F on 25 degree increments.  It puts the best crust on bread but with 1 steaming cup, instead of 2 like i used,  you are limited to about 1,000 g for a loaf of bread and oval is better than round if you use 1 steaming cup.  They make a stone for it too, for $20 but I haven't found one at Goodwill yet.

I bake everything in it in the summer that I would bake in the normal oven  - except it bakes better than the big old GE. Veggies, meat, fish, potato wedges, pies, cookie, cakes,  you name it - it can do it. 

We eat well around here and it is the mini oven's fault - in the summer.

Model CTO-390  1,500 Watts

Happy baking Varda

 

varda's picture
varda

Thinking about maybe adding a small oven.   That sounds like a good one.  -Varda

Mebake's picture
Mebake

A treat it is indeed, DA! Full of goodness and flavor. Your daughter was right, this bread is really hard to beat.

Happy summer baking to you, DA!

-Khalid

Song Of The Baker's picture
Song Of The Baker

Hey man, another nice hearty bread.  You know I love all those seeds and grains.  I think you may have missed a grain/seed or two...no wait...nope, you got em all.

Why do you choose to bake the breads outside in the summertime?  Just curious.  My dabrown tan is starting to fade.  Nice and sunny since I returned, but too much work leads to no tanning time.

Do you ever toast that bread?  I bet it would turn out nicely.

Happy baking!  Im taking a weekend off of baking to get caught up on my 187 work emails while away...down to 95....ugh.

John 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

bread was baked I told her to give it a smell.  Between the ground and un-ground toasted seeds, nuts and Toadies the bread had a wonderful aroma.   I told her that most bread doesn't smell anywhere near as good even after it is baked and that this is the way real bread smells.  We were both shocked how much the aroma changed after baking -  and how much better it became.  Bread is amazing and hits all the senses.

Glad you liked it Khalid.  I think we will be going back to 100% whole grain bread next week inspired by you last post or possibly a white bread depending on what side of her brain Lucy wakes up on.  

Happy baking