The Fresh Loaf

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GC Starter Test 060607

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bluezebra's picture
bluezebra

GC Starter Test 060607

METHOD: The purpose of this test on the sourdough starter is to test how long he takes to rise in a 60% hydration, lean dough.

Time 3:00pm

75.7 degrees F

31.5 and rising barometric pressure

2 oz General Chaos Starter

4 oz AP Walmart Brand Flour

2.25oz Filtered Water (Pur)

3/8 tsp Iodized Salt

Mixed all ingredients together for about 2 minutes until dough formed that pulled away from sides of dough but still stuck to bottom.

Transferred to a large glass measuring cup and covered with plastic wrap and a saucer.

Comments

bluezebra's picture
bluezebra

Just went in to check on the bread. I am sick this week and laid down to take a short nap at 5pm. Unfortunately, I just woke up and I've missed my 4 hour mark. The dough is over doubled by now. I didn't give it the poke test. I haven't even kneaded it yet, to tell you the truth. I just kinda dropped it in the measuring glass and forgot all about it.

I guess I will go get it out of the glass and knead it for a couple of minutes then shape it into a small loaf and let it rise a second time. Then bake to see what will happen with it.

 

bwraith's picture
bwraith

Hi BZ,

Maybe it's still not all the way up to speed, but it's not far off. I think mine would double this dough recipe in a little over 4 hours at 76F. So, I'm guessing you should be able to bake a pretty reasonable bread. I'm wondering if the starter has sped up somewhat, because if it more than doubles in 4.75 hours, then it should also double from a 1:4:4 feeding in closer to 6 hours, rather than 8. Maybe there is some detail about either the consistency, the amount of stirring, or the protein in your flour that makes it rise a little more slowly, since it seems to raise the test dough quite well.

I'll be curious to know if you got a chance to bake it. If not, at least the fact it rose so well is a very good sign.

Bill

kjknits's picture
kjknits

I hope so!  Let us know how the bread test went!

Katie 

bluezebra's picture
bluezebra

Sourdough Test LoafSourdough Test Loaf

Here is the test loaf from yesterday. It rose over double  in 4 hours 45 minutes. I then punched it down and kneaded it (prolly bass-ackwards in method?) I don't know, I've only worked with high hydration loaves so far really. I had a tough time getting it to a window pane. Never really did.

I would knead the dough for a couple of minutes then let it sit for an hour then came back and kneaded it again. Did that all night long and each time I tested it, the dough fought back at me! It was very elastic if I'm using that term right? But not extensible?

I put it in the fridge over nite thinking that would help it. I took it out this morning and let it rise till this afternoon. By the poke test, it was showing that it had proofed. The dough had doubled itself. And I put it in to bake. I forgot to slash it so I quickly whipped it out and using a serated knife, made 3 quick angled slashes. The top had almost formed a small crust when I did it. It was super easy to slash at that point lol!

The hole structure is pretty dense but I didn't exactly do anything to keep the dough from being compact! Meaning I didn't try to preserve gas bubbles or anything. But this should at least show that GC is a working starter!

What do you think?

bwraith's picture
bwraith

Hi BZ,

I'd say it's working. doubling in 4:45 is fine. I think you may not be used to a small dough, the low hydration, and the effect of SD starter on it. It will get stiff quickly because of the effect of the acid on the gluten. You probably don't need to knead it much. Just folding it a few times is going to work fine. It can relax, fold it if it is relaxed enough, otherwise just let it rise. You handle it less with SD, in my experience, and you don't want to degas it as much later, because after a while, the gluten will deteriorate from the acid and not be able to hold in the gas anymore. Anyway, you'll get the hang of it. There are differences from yeast, but once you get the feel of the dough and the timing, it will work well.

Good luck with it. I'd say that was a very encouraging test. I imagine the starter will stabilize and probably speed up over time if you keep feeding it at about 1:4:4 every 12 hours. If you get tired of it, you can always refrigerate the starter after it doubles and take it out again when you're ready to revive it and refresh it a few times.

Bill

kjknits's picture
kjknits

Hey BZ< the bread looks great!  How did it taste?

Katie 

bwraith's picture
bwraith

Hi BlueZebra,

Just checking in again and wondering how the big bread projects are going. I know you weren't feeling well, so I was being patient and hope you're feeling better. Maybe this is nagging a sick girl, but what about Sir Stinky? Here's wishing you well. I need my BZ blog fix.

Bill

bluezebra's picture
bluezebra

going in Stinky Land. Sorry I didn't get back with you but I'm still fighting health stuff right now.

 The test loaf tasted really great but I have to admit we both love your Pagnotta the best because of the texture of the bread.

 I got Stinky out of the ice box after about a little over a 2 week or so, snooze. He smelled pretty yummy...kinda like bananas? But after feeding him and stirring him pretty often, he started smelling vinegary again. Not the obnoxious smell at all but the bananas and fruit have left the building! After 3 feedings, Stinky is more than doubling (like almost tripling?) in about 4-5 hours with a 1:2:2 feeding. I started making a preferment today with the starter. I am planning on trying to make the pagnotta and also looking to see if I can make some pizza dough that we like to put it away for a cold ferment (hope I'm using the right terminology). I'd like to also try real French bread but haven't researched the recipe yet and we really don't need two batches of bread.

I'm going to try making a blue cheese and onion pagnotta inspired by Mike Avery's blue cheese and onion rolls. Lol, don't know if I will be successful at it, but maybe I've learned a little more from reading about how to really develop my dough. I am fairly certain now, that I am not fully developing the gluten.

Will let you know how it works. I'm planning on making the dough tomorrow and am hoping to be able to try SD-G's French Fold technique. I didn't realize all this time that French Folds were different from the stretch and fold. Oh well, you learn something new all the time.

Again, thanks for being my friend and checking in on me and Stinky. I was pretty certain that I hadn't made many friends here, so didn't really think I would be missed. :D Hugs and hope your baking is going great!

bwraith's picture
bwraith

Hi BZ,

I was missing the banter. Sorry you're still not feeling well. Glad to hear you're cranking away with Sir Stinky, though. Sounds like all is well if not just terrific with the starter. The bananas smell could just be a sign of it needing a feeding, and the vinegar smell sounds normal once it's active. If it is rising by double or more in 4-5 hours after a 1:2:2 feeding, it sounds pretty healthy.

Your ideas for sourdough recipes to try all sound great. I'm looking forward to finding out how they go.

BZ, I hope you get your head of steam back soon, and all the best. Good luck with the baking projects.

Bill