The Fresh Loaf

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WW SD YW Multi-Grain DaPumpernickel

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dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

WW SD YW Multi-Grain DaPumpernickel

For the 2nd test of our new 2 week old WW starter, we though we would continue our 100% whole grain quest to a 3rd bake, similar to the last 2, but making a few changes along the way as my apprentice usually does.  She just can’t leave well enough, or me either for that matter, alone.

 

We decided to add in some YW to the mix to help open the crumb of the planned pumpernickel baking temperature and schedule.  We also decided to change from a 100% whole wheat, 100% whole grain bread to one that was still 100% whole grain but had equal portions of WW, Spelt and Rye.  We omitted the VWG on this bake.

   

We also added some barley malt syrup and cut the molasses in half and throw in some bread spices consisting of; black and brown caraway, coriander, anise and fennel.  To keep in line with the change in whole grains we also changed the whole berry scald to match it using WW, Spelt and Rye.

  

The resulting overall hydration of 87.5% is fairly in the middle of the pumpernickel hydrations we do around here in AZ where it is so dry all time.  The method was pretty straight forward if a tiny bit unusual.   We built the whole wheat combo SD YW levain together over (2) 4 hour builds where it easily doubled.

  

After a 1 hour autolyse that had everything in it but the levain and scald, we mixed the levain and the autolyse together with a spoon and then did 10 minutes of slap and folds trying to develop as much gluten as we could = what fun.  We then folded in the scald berries with a bench knife.

 

 Once the berries were evenly distributed, we tossed the paste into a large bread pan filling it about 3/4th full.  The paste filled the pan fuller than we would normally like for pumpernickel but, my apprentice was lazy and refused to pull it out, divide it and put into two smaller cocktail pans.

 

 She did, to be fair, reminded me that the Altus loaf at 300 G lsss in size actually shrank the last time leaving the finished bread 1” below the rim of this same pan.  We dusted the loaf with oat bran and let it ferment on the counter for an hour before it went into the fridge covered in plastic, for a 16 hour retard.

 

It's a little more dense and moist on the bottom.

It had risen to the top of the pan when it came out of the fridge the next morning when it went into a plastic bag to warm up and do final proof on a heating pad for 3 hours.  Since the bread would eventually rise almost an inch above the pan rim, we decided to bake it low and slow; pumpernickel style, in the WagnerWare, MagnaLite turkey roaster with the trivet inside so extra water could be added to steam the loaf.

The temperature reducing (as time goes on) baking schedule follows:

400 F - 30 minutes

375 F - 30 minutes

350 F - 30 minutes

325 F - 30 minutes

300 F - 1 hour

275 F - 2 hours

250 F - 2 hours

225 F - 1 ½ hours

200 F - 1 ½ hours

We had a powerful sunset last night

When the bread tests 205 F in the center, turn off the oven and leave the bread in the DO inside the oven for 8 -12 hours.  We did 8 hours and the oven was still warm in the morning due to the two baking stones on the top and bottom rack of the oven.

The 3 P sandwich - DaPumpernickel, Pepperjack and Pate

Yes, it is a long bake but worth it in the end if you want to make a classic pumpernickel style loaf.  Not that this one is a classic, since it isn't 100% rye, have cornmeal, potatoes or bacon fat in it.  But this sure tastes like a pumpernickel even if it doesn't really use classic pumpernickel flours and uses an Irish Stout for much of the liquid. That’s the great thing about bread – there aren't any real rules, especially if you choose not to follow them like my apprentice.  This bread smell tremendous with the caramelized grains, scald and aromatic seeds.

Love the first one so much we made a variant - DaPumpernickel, Irish Swiss and Pate open face

Sadly, even after it cools you don’t want to slice it for at least 32 hours.  Just wrap it on linen or cotton and be as patient as you need to be…. We love pumpernickel and do not mind waiting, as long as, we win the Power Ball tonight for over $320 plus million.  Well we didn't win the big moola drawing but we still won a jackpot none the less.  We took a few slices off the loaf this morning for pictures and breakfast, re-wrapping the rest to let it sit another 24 hours before slicing it.

A close up open face sandwich - in your face:-)

This bread easily sliced 1/4" thick slices even for such a large loaf.  The bread was open and very moist.  It is also about the best tasting example of a non-traditional pumpernickel my German apprentice has ever tasted.  She wanted to take the rest of the loaf outside to bury it in the back yard but I managed to stop her before she got to the doggie door.  It is a powerful bread flavor wise, as much so as last night's sunset,  and we can't wait to try it with some robust red wine, pate, cheese and fruit spread especially after this morning's toasted pumpernickel with butter, egg, hot sausage and bacon delight.    Yummy. 

Formula

SD Starter

Build 1

Build 2

Total

%

Mini's WW Starter

20

0

20

3.28%

Yeast Water

30

0

30

6.00%

Whole Wheat

50

50

100

20.00%

Water

20

40

60

12.00%

Total

90

90

210

42.00%

 

 

 

 

 

SD Levain Totals

 

%

 

 

Flour

110

22.00%

 

 

Water

100

20.00%

 

 

Hydration

90.91%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Levain % of Total

16.15%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

 

Whole Rye

165

33.00%

 

 

Whole Spelt

165

33.00%

 

 

Whole Wheat

170

34.00%

 

 

Dough Flour

500

100.00%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Salt

9

1.80%

 

 

Guinness

423

84.60%

 

 

Dough Hydration

84.60%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour

610

 

 

 

Guinness, YW & SD Starter Water

523

 

 

 

T. Dough Hydration

85.74%

 

 

 

Whole Grain %

100.00%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hydration w/ Adds

87.50%

 

 

 

Total Weight

1,300

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Add - Ins

 

%

 

 

Red Rye Malt

3

0.60%

 

 

White Rye Malt

3

0.60%

 

 

Caraway, Anise, Fennel & Coriander

16

3.20%

 

 

Toadies

4

0.80%

 

 

Barley malt

16

3.20%

 

 

Molasses

16

3.20%

 

 

Total

58

11.60%

 

 

Comments

isand66's picture
isand66

Looks amazing so far!  I am sure the crumb shot will not dissapoint.  I'm going to try one of these soon...I swear! 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

turned out very nice but still needs another 24 hours of rest before being as good as this bread will get.   It takes a while to make but it is worth it in the end.  If you make this remember that my oven read 25 F hotter than it really is so if your oven is right on them you need to cut the temps by 25 F.  I also added 1 T of water to the bottom of the turkey roaster at every temperature change and stopped that after 275 F.

Happy baking Ian

isand66's picture
isand66

Info is noted.  this looks like it came out great and must taste wonderful whether it's an authentic Pumpershnickel or not!

PMcCool's picture
PMcCool

waiting to see the crumb and hear how it tastes!  Expecting magnificence.

Paul

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

less so on the bottom.  Probably should have docked the top before going in the oven.  It really tastes great and exactly what I was hoping for.  Should be wonderful toasted with a schmear and lox.  We will see how it goes toasted with a schmear, pate and cheese for lunch.

Happy baking Paul

Mebake's picture
Mebake

I'll call this DA pumpernickel :)

I'm not partial to pumpernickel breads, be it Rye or wheat, but this bake of yours will sure please me!

Another great bake DA! Your apprentice should be glad to have German type breads in AZ, she longs to her bavarian roots.

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

We also love the name Dapumpernickel too, so that is what we will call it from now on!  It is a powerful tasting bread.

Glad you liked it Khalid, happy baking and thanks for the name.

Song Of The Baker's picture
Song Of The Baker

Hey man, nice pumpernickel!  I have yet to try making one.  I was about to a few months back and got side tracked with Danish rye.  I will try this recipe out when my parents return from Mesa.  My dad is a big fan of Pumpernickel and I would love to surprise him with this.  Also, any excuse to get some Guinness in the house is good with me!  Thanks for the RE-inspiration.

John

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

great in your turkey roaster too.  You and your Dad will like this bread!  Just follow the changes I noted to Ian and Paul.  I also did open the lid to let the steam out every hour after 275 F too.  Are yous till coming to Meaa in April?  Maybe we can meet up and have a Guinness?

Happy baking John

Song Of The Baker's picture
Song Of The Baker

Depending on how busy the business is, I am planning to come down end of April or beginning of May.  That sounds great.   Will keep you posted! 

Looking forward to checking out Sedona, the sunshine, if im lucky some golf, lakes, ghost towns!

John

Song Of The Baker's picture
Song Of The Baker

Another thing I have been meaning to ask the almighty whole grain and seed expert.  If I can't find rye chops, could I just boil the rye berries until soft, then simply chop up with a knife or blitz quickly in a food processor?

John

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

I consider rye chops the grind between cracked rye and medium/coarse rye meal or pumpernickel.  I have only used my cheapo Krupp's coffee mill to make them.  I do soak them afterwards though - to make sure nothing stays hard  inside the bread after it is baked.  

Hope this helps

hanseata's picture
hanseata

I admire you in-grained dedication, DBM, but calling this "pumpernickel" is like hearing a crayon screech on a blackboard!  Those Westphalian ancestors who invented the Pumpernickel would surely rotate in their graves if they know that their all rye bread turned into an "any grain" loaf. (What kind of German is your apprentice to approve of this?)

Other than that German shudder, it's an interesting technique to bake a bread like yours with slowly falling temperatures, like a pumpernickel. And I'm sure it tastes good - though, like Khalid, I'm no great pumpernickel friend (I mean the original).

On my way to New Orleans for our annual mother-daughter trip,

Karin

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

way to skin a pumperberry:-)

I've seen all kinds of what 'the bread gods' call pumpernickel and they have all kinds of stuff in them - like one of mine.  I'd hate to see and ian pumpernickel!   We really should be more careful.  I suppose what claimes to be the old German recipe I have that has, bacon fat, potato water, potato SD starter, half  rye and half spelt or einkorn in it - isn't really pumpernickel?  How about the one that isn't as old, after 1500 AD but also has corn meal, no potato water, but does have beer in it and is half whole wheat but baked for 20 hours isn't pumpernickel either ?   Who ever it was noted the water wasn't fit to drink in the old days so they used beer for the liquid instead.  Even German extraction, certified, master bakers in the states call their bread pumpernickel that has, commercial yeast, coffee and half white flour in them and aren't even baked using falling temperatures but rather baked a 450 F for less than an hour instead.  That doesn't make it right!  I saw one recipe that didn't evrn have rye flour in it....Shameful!

I'm with you all the way and also think that words have meaning and need to be defended otherwise folks will forget what real pumpernickel is supposed to be.  You are also right that my Germanic baking apprentice should be ashamed of herself!  I'm guessing that  real Pumpernickel should be and all rye in both flour and scalds, use a rye sourdough starter, be sweetened with honey only if sweetened at all, not use anything but water for the liquid, use a little salt and be baked using falling temperatures for at least 12 hours.  I'm not sure they had covered baking pans back then either.  Possibly they should be free formed as well?  No butter, shortening, bacon fat, Postum, corn meal, chocolate, barley malt syrup, coffee of any kind, potatoes, buttermilk, sour cream, red or white malts, Toadies, molasses, bread spices or any of the other things I've see floating around.  I really enjoyed the pumpernickel research for this post and actually learned something useful for a change!

So I'm changing the name to Dapumpernickel as Khalid suggested. 

I don't think I've ever seen, eaten or made a real pumpernickel?  I'm guessing I would like this bread better than the original too.  It sure tastes good for a poorly named copy :-)  The seeds were especially nice and aromatic.

Enjoy your trip to NO and the visit with your daughter.  They are special times not to be forgotten.  You won't find any real pumpernickel there I'm guessing but might find a Guinness as a consolation prize :-)  After all, it is N Orleans!

Glad you liked the bread.

Happy baking Karin.

 

 

hanseata's picture
hanseata

Haha, I'm postitive your bread tastes better than the original that I only buy to use it in a traditional dessert called Pommeranian Ambrosia - "Pommersche Götterspeise" (made with layers of Pumpernickel crumbs, chocolate, cranberry preserve and whipped cream.)

The first thing our landlady told us was where the best dives with the largest drinks for the least bucks were to be found in the French Quarter! And you are right - I haven't encountered any bread here, yet, that had even a hint of a whole grain it it.

Karin

 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

in Architectural school was from NO.  He and his wife taught me how to make Creole and Cajun food. They were one of each who thankfully could not agree on how to cook anything - made for a nice variety and spicy conversation.  We took several trips to NO just to make sure that the recipes were spot on - and to make sure that the French Quarter wasn't changed to the Latin Quarter  :-)  We sort of spent New Years and Fat Tuesday's there quite a bit.    You might find a French country loaf or rustic loaf in a bakery that has a small amount of  whole grains in it but that too might be impossible.  Better to stick with the large cheap drinks in the craw daddy dives :-)

DaSeeds in DaPumpernickel really made it aromatic and tasty - even though there weren't a whole lot of them.

bakingbadly's picture
bakingbadly

Never had pumpernickel but your loaf sure looks delicious! I shall look forward to the crumbshots and your verdict on its flavour profile.

Have a jolly baking, DA,

Zita 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

either Zita and know I've never made any real authentic ones.   But, this tastes very good for a 'pumpernickel style' bread.  Absolutely one of my favorites, even though I have so many favorites :-)   If you can lay your hands on some rye, you should give it a go just for fun.  The taste won't disappoint and it is really an easy bread, if time consuming, to make.  Add it to your baking list for sure.  It's not for everyone but you never know until you taste it.

Happy baking Zita

varda's picture
varda

Interesting bake.   Requires thought and study.   And tasting of course.  -Varda

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

enjoyed this bake as the culmination of the 3 in a row, 100% whole grain bakes using the New Not Mini's Ancient WW Starter.  All 3 of the breads were very good in their own slightly more different way as the bakes continued, but this one is in a taste class of its own if you like these kinds of 'pumpernickel style' breads like I do.  I suppose one could compare it to those who think Roquefort is the King of Cheeses.  I would call this an example of the King of Breads - Roquefort on it would be to die for, or lox or pate or just about anything really....

Next time, I would final proof it and bake it tightly covered in foil to hold it together so the top isnl't more open than the bottom but still bake it in the DO with the T water.  If you have a pullman, that would work but you might have a hard time finding a big enough DO to fit it in.

Happy baking Varda. 

Mebake's picture
Mebake

Looks really good, DA! 

Too bad you didn't bake it in one of those pullman pans, it would have looked even better. I din't own a pullman either, instead, i bought me a terrine pan which is narrower but works well. 

Lovely crumb , DA, and i'm sure it packs tons of flavor.

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

hard about putting foil over it when it hit the top of the rim when I took it out of the fridge after the overnight retard.  That would have helped make the crumb more even.  My apprentice wanted to cover it.  I should listen to her more often :-)   We will bake it again and again -  so no worries next time being better.

You are so right - This bread has nothing but flavor Khalid!

Alpana's picture
Alpana

The berries, the aromatics and the crumb! I don't think any comment is needed :). I baked a simple whole rye in pullman tin for a friend, with your reducing temp trick. She is very happy with the bread. Thanks for all the tips.

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Alpana - something I don't think I have ever done! Way to go.   I'm guessing it was dark and very tasty!  Your friend is very lucky to have you and your baking skills nearby!

Happy baking Alpana!

hungryscholar's picture
hungryscholar

Sounds delicious and creative, even if perhaps not traditional. If I ever get around to the slowly falling temp bake with steam like this I'll be sorely tempted to go multigrain like this.

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

multi-grain taste to just one flour which is why we usually mix them up as such.  I love these breads and the taste is powerful.  You should try it out just for fun and to experience the taste of doing it at home with fresh milled flours.  But it's not for everyone.  I prefer it with the aromatic seeds too.

Happy baking hungyscholar.