The Fresh Loaf

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Christmas Sourdough Chacon - Figs, Pistachios and Seeds

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dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Christmas Sourdough Chacon - Figs, Pistachios and Seeds

We were struggling with our normally robustmRye sour and Desem mixed SD starter.  It had been left for dead after its last feeding and storage about a month ago.  I had baked 4 loaves of bread from the 80 g stored and had 40 g left and it was looking the worse for wear.

 

We tried building a levain using 5 g and 1:10:10 but after 20 hours there was no visible change.  The kitchen temperature was 65 F and we though the low temperature might be the problem.  So, we added 5 more grams of starter, put it in a 78 F environment that the microwave provided with one of Sylvia's steaming cups.

 

Sure enough 6 hours later, the levain and finally nearly doubled.  You for get how nice the AZ summers are for over proofing just about anything and everything.  Now with winter temps of 65 F yeast just doesn’t like to be aroused and put to work.

  

We took the remaining 30 g of starter and fed it but kept it on the counter to double which it nearly did in 24 hours.  We decided it and feed it again to get it back up to speed and saved the other half for some panettone bake possibly for Christmas but more likely for New Years.

  

We decided to use our revived starter to make a variation of one of our favorite breads; fig, pistachio, sunflower and pumpkin seed bread.  But, we decided to try and bake it like you would pumpernickel - long, slow and low and see if the crust and crumb would turn a dark brown color like pumpernickel does baked this way.

 

The question was which way to do this; the Norm Berg way, the Andy way, the Mini Oven way or the Jeffrey Hamelman way - or some combination which could be a dangerous meeting of the ryes.  My apprentice wanted to use our Wagner Ware Magnalite Turkey roaster since nothing puts a dark brown crust on bread like it does – nothing even close.

  

The trivet on the bottom allows extra water to be placed in the roaster so that it doesn’t touch the bread itself.  We hoped that the steam in the roaster with an oval shaped chacon would substitute for the aluminum foil covered tins normally used for pumpernickel. 

It was worth a shot and, if it wasn’t turning out right, my apprentice could always save the day, as she has taught herself to do in out kitchen, by taking the lid off and bake the bread to 205 F on the inside at a higher temperature – none the worse for wear - if you are like my apprentice and will eat anything.

The levain was build with one build over and agonizing 26 hours.  Everything except the levain, barley malt syrup, figs, pistachios, seeds and salt were autolysed for 2 hours.  Once the levain, barley malt syrup and salt were added to the autolyse, we did 10 minutes of French slap and folds which were nice to do at 75% hydration.

The dough was rested 20 minutes in an oiled, plastic covered bowl when 3 sets of S& F’s were done on 20 minute intervals.  The figs, pistachios and seeds were added in during the 2nd set of S& F’s.  Half the seeds were held back for a ringed topping around the knotted roll.

Inside at the crack of dawn you can see the holes in the crumb better.  Haven't had lunch with it yet but the sunset was nice.

Once the S&F’s were complete, the dough was allowed to ferment and develop on the counter for 1 hour before being shaped into a single knot chacon and placed in a rice floured basket.  The basket was placed in a nearly new trash can liner and allowed to develop for another hour before being retarded in the fridge overnight for 8 hours.

The next morning the dough basket was retrieved from the fridge and allowed to come to room temperature and final proof for 4 hours when it had doubled.  Now came the time to decide which way to bake it – what turned out to be a difficult decision.

After much thought, careful deliberation with my apprentice and talking to rye experts worldwide we decided that Mini Oven’s way of baking it was the way to go.  Baking in the specialized turkey roaster at 320 F until it registered 205 F on the inside was the simplest most efficient way to go in order to have the oven empty by 2 PM when the girls needed it to bake Christmas cookies.

After a half and hour the bread has spread out rather than up probably due to the low temperature but it was a slightly darker color.  We put it back in the oven for another 50 minutes at 320 F.  When we checked the temp was at 203 F and the color was still pale.

So we cranked up the oven to 425 F, convection this time and took the bread out of the turkey roaster and baked it directly on the oven rack for 15 more minutes.  At that time it registered 205 F and it was a blistered weird brown color not usually associated with this kind of bread.  So off went the oven and we let the bread crisp on the oven rack with the door ajar for 10 minutes.

This has to be the strangest and longest way to make a Frisbee that my apprentice has ever managed.   Thank goodness she is a professional! Can’t wait to see what it looks like on the inside.  Hopefully it will be a darker brown color than it would otherwise be and taste way better too - or this bake will go down as total and complete apprentice failure, if well meaning.

The bread, while flat, had a nice open crumb for so much stuff in it.  The crumb was much darker than normal and it was moist and soft.  The taste was enhanced like a light caramelization on anything will do.  I was really shocked how deep the flavor was and how nice this bread tasted - toasted it was outstanding.  Can't wait to try some pate on it.   When we do this again, we will start the bread baking at 450 F for 20 minutes so it wouldn't spread out and spring instead.  Then turn the oven down to 230 F like Andy does for his pumpernickel and get in the low portion of the bake until 205 F registered on the inside. 

You learn from each bake, like we did this time, so this one was not a total loss - and the bread that came out of it was quite unlike any we managed to bake to date.

Formula

SD Levain

Build 1

Total

%

 

Rye Sour and Desem Starter

10

10

2.72%

 

WW

5

5

1.63%

 

Spelt

5

5

1.63%

 

Kamut

5

5

1.63%

 

Dark Rye

13

13

4.25%

 

AP

28

28

9.15%

 

Water

56

56

18.30%

 

Total Starter

122

122

39.87%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Starter

 

 

 

 

Hydration

100.00%

 

 

 

Levain % of Total

15.66%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dough Flour

 

%

 

 

Spelt

14

4.58%

 

 

WW

14

4.58%

 

 

Dark Rye

26

8.50%

 

 

Toady Tom's Toasted   Tidbits

10

3.27%

 

 

Red Malt

2

0.65%

 

 

White Malt

2

0.65%

 

 

Kamut

14

4.58%

 

 

Potaoto Flakes

10

3.27%

 

 

Oat Flour

10

3.27%

 

 

AP

204

66.67%

 

 

Dough Flour

306

100.00%

 

 

Salt

7

2.29%

1.91%

Total   Flour

Water

209

68.30%

 

 

Dough Hydration

68.30%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Flour

367

 

 

 

Water

270

 

 

 

Total Dough Hydration

73.57%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hydration w/ Adds

74.93%

 

 

 

Total Weight

779

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Whole Grains

34.06%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Add - Ins

 

%

 

 

Figs Adriatic and Mission

50

16.34%

 

 

Pistachio, Sunflower   & Pumpkin

75

24.51%

 

 

Total

135

44.12%

 

 

 

Comments

varda's picture
varda

and when you see what goes into it, looks even better.    I'm sure it will help make your holiday festive.   -Varda

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

my wife relatives come in from Chicago and NJ for dinner.  It's going to be grilled salmon with shrimp and veggie kabobs with pate, cheese, bread, crackers and cookies and PIE for desert.  This bread tastes so good it deserves pate and cheese :-)

Thanks Varda

JOHN01473's picture
JOHN01473

i wish we had smell-a-vision and taste-a-vision.

its a shame you cant email slices of this to me.

this looks wonderful and i have got to give it a try.

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

be disappointed with this bread , even if you bake it off normally in a DO.  I think it tinned it up, covered it in foil to baked like a pumpernickel is the way to get the bast flavor.  Besides Mini's Oven's baking schedule here were the other ones my apprentice was contemplating.

Norm Berg’s Black Pumpernickel

About 1 hour before bake time, preheat your oven to 500°F/255°C, with the baking surface in the middle and a steam pan on a lower shelf.   Bake for 15 minutes and reduce heat to 400°F/205°C. After 15 minutes more, reduce heat to 300°F/150°C and continue baking until the center of the loaf reaches an internal temperature of 210°F/100°C, 80-90 minutes. Remove to a rack and let cool for at least 24 hours before cutting.

Andy’s Black Pumpernickel

Pre-heat the oven to 280°C. Load the pan, apply steam, and turn the oven down to 110°C.  Keep a supply of steam in the oven and bake for a total of 4½ - 6 hours.

Hamelman’s Pumpernickel

Place the pans in the oven and bake at 350°F for 1 hour.

Turn oven down to 325°F and bake for 30 minutes.

Turn oven down to 300°F and bake for 1 hour.

Turn oven down to 275°F and bake for 2 hours.

Turn oven down to 260°F and bake for 2 hours.

Turn oven down to 225°F and bake for 1 1/2 hours.

Turn oven down to 200°F and bake for 1 1/2 hours.

Turn oven off and leave pans in oven until morning.

 

 

gmagmabaking2's picture
gmagmabaking2

That is quite the project loaf of bread... looks like it will taste wonderful with all those goodies inside.  You and my sister Barb are fabulous at those long process breads... I like quicker results... one day I might develop some patience to do all those steps and waiting etc.  French slapping and stretch and folds... those excape me, although I have done stretch and folds on simpler breads... have no idea how to slap in multiple languages... There is so much to learn for you. I check daily for your posts and a new lesson in bread "fantasies"... good job DA... I am attempting the Sweet Vanilla (rounded braid) Challa for tomorrow's Christmas dinner with the younger gma and her family... will post results.

Merry Christmas, Diane

 

 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

tried a Challah with vanilla before.  Sounds tasty! There is a great video, or 2, on French slap and folds that we  learned from. - a real help if you don't want to use a mixer - or clean it.    A lot more work than S&F's though :-)  This is one of the best tasting breads my apprentice has managed to make.  She is a determined German.  Glad you liked the bread and remember........Patience comes to those who wait ....a long, long time!

Enjoy your Christmas dinner with your sister and her family - Best to you and yours!

Sjadad's picture
Sjadad

Dabrownman - that loaf looks like a meal in itself!  Or maybe a dessert. Beautiful and very creative. I'm certain that will make your Christmas merrier. 

Sjadad

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

and had it toasted with butter for breakfast...Yummy! Glad you liked the bread.  Never tried to do a Pumpernickel  process on a non Pumpernickel style bread before....

Happy Baking Sjadad!

gmabaking's picture
gmabaking

This beautiful bread has me thinking of all the different things to slather upon it....from smoked meats to marmalade to the simple touch of unsalted butter. I can but wonder what will grace your table with this lovely bread? Something intense and most interesting I imagine!

Wishing you and yours Happy Holidays and Merry Christmas

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

pate on it for dinner and had it toasted with unsalted butter for breakfast.  It is surf and surf for dinner tonight, with 12 breads and 12 cheeses for today's belated Hanukkah dinner and the 12 days of Christmas to come.  Have been freezing and saving a quarter of each loaf recently baked - just for today and rest of Christmas - quite an assortment. 

The best to you and yours this Christmas and Holiday Season!

FlourChild's picture
FlourChild

Love the ingredients and the chacon presentation- can't wait to hear how the crumb turned out :)

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Double post for some reason

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

I was surprised how open the crumb was after spreading out so much.  The low, slow baking process really did make the crumb darker than usual and taste better too.  We really like this bread.  Should have panned it up like a rye to keep it from spreading though :-)  You would like this bread FlourChild!

Thanks!

isand66's picture
isand66

We await the final verdict...I'm sure the inside will not dissapoint.

Nice baking as always.

Ian

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

never seems to be as bad for my Frisbee bakes as it should be :-) This is one of those breads we will make again and again.  The taste is terrific.  It's a very pretty bread inside and out with a darker even moister crumb than usual, and again, the taste ....

Glad I was able to save the starter and not have to resurrect my frozen one!

The 6 week stollen unveiling happens in a couple of hours.  That should be  eventful.

Thanks Ian!

isand66's picture
isand66

Your crumb came out great.  I hope your guests enjoy it as much as you do.  I look forward to hearing about your stollen unveiling.

I'm prepping my Ale Jewish Rye, brisket for the kreplach and tomorrow I make the soup for next weeks family gathering and perogi to bring to our friends and for next week.

Enjoy your weekend and the holiday season.

Ian

longhorn's picture
longhorn

That is one glorious loaf! Wonderfully rustic and enticing. Well done!

Jay

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

I am amazed how many of my bakes end up being 'rustic' :-)  Good thing too since I've actually learned to like unintended rustic bread more than what they were originally intended!!  This one tastes as good as it looks.

Glad you liked it and thanks for your nice comments.

Happy Holiday Baking.

longhorn's picture
longhorn

I think rustic reinforces hand made but I am very particular about the details of rusticity...the color, the crumb, etc. I want it to be just so. Love the look of that loaf. Great ingredients too though you use some I don't know (well at least Toadies Toasty bits or whatever they are!). I will try a variation of this soon, probably using a combo of Spelt and Teff along with the seeds and nuts and figs.... Good base formula. I will probably bump the hydration a tad but...can't wait to try it!

Jay

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

had a bake where he pan toasted some bran with some  wheat germ and something else I can't remember.  I used some oat bran in my TTTT  too.  Since toad.de real name is Tom I christened his pan toasting concoction of wheat bran and wheat germ and what ever else -  Toady Tom's Toasted Tidbits and use then in almost every bake.  They lend a lovely toasted flavor and those beautiful brown specks in the bread that I love to see and eat.  75% is about as low a hydration as I go especially with so much freshly milled whole grains and' more water wouldn't hurt any and probably open the crumb some more - as would some YW - if it were baked in a normal non pumpernickel way.   You are right - this formula is a nice base to build from and you will end up with a fine bread where ever you take it.

Happy baking Jay!

bakingbadly's picture
bakingbadly

The aroma, the taste... it must've been wonderful!

Very scrumptious, indeed, DA! So many goodies are stuffed into that loaf that slicing it open, I imagine, would be like unwrapping a long awaited Christmas or birthday present. :)

Have a merry Christmas,

Zita

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

a good description for this bread.  It is like opening a birthday present was beautifully wrapped!  I'm going to have some for breakfast.

Thanks Zita!

Song Of The Baker's picture
Song Of The Baker

Dabrownman.  I am starting to understand your profile name.  All your breads are a nice rich brown colour!  Not sure if they are quite man-ish but they sure are brown!

I am still toasting up the fig chestnut rye from 2 weeks ago (froze a massive loaf and it won't go away!)  These breads toasted are great.  Peanut butter and tad bit of jam, toasted....O.k. I am heading to my freezer now.

Inspiring as usual.

John