The Fresh Loaf

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Zolablue Cinnamon Rolls

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dvuong's picture
dvuong

Zolablue Cinnamon Rolls

I plan on making Zolablue's cinnamon rolls this weekend and had a question about mixing technique.  When I attended SFBI, they had taught us to hold back sugar and butter when mixing rich doughs until the gluten is fully developed.  When the gluten is developed,  you can start to mix in the sugar and butter until it is fully absorbed into the dough.  The theory behind this is that the high ratios of butter and sugar inhibit gluten development causing longer mixing times = greater oxidation.

I was wondering if anyone has used this technique with their sweet doughs and if you thought it would be appropriate to use with Zolablue's cinnamon rolls.  http://elisfoods.wordpress.com/2008/11/20/cinnamon-rolls/

yy's picture
yy

I've tried the technique of holding back sugar and butter with the Baking Team USA Sweet Dough formula in Maggie Glezer's book.   All the other ingredients were mixed to medium development. Then the sugar and salt were added and mixed until incorporated, followed by the butter in stages. The overall mixing time to reach the thin, smooth windowpane stage was definitely shorter than if I had included the sugar in the initial mix, and I felt like the finished product had a softer, more pillowy texture. I think it's worth a try with zolablue's cinnamon rolls. 

 

dvuong's picture
dvuong

The zolablue forumla calls for shortening, now that I take a better look at it.  Do you think this would apply the same with shortening?  And actually.. now that I think about it, what if I subsitututed butter for shortening?  Do you think the end result of the dough would be the same?

yy's picture
yy

This would apply to any fat, so you would use a same procedure with shortening. Personally, I would substitute butter for shortening. It's a lot less trans fat, and the taste will be much better. Shortening will probably tenderize your dough slightly more, but it won't be that noticeable. Flavor is more important. Go with butter!

WilderThanYeast's picture
WilderThanYeast

I completely agree with you. In yeasted doughs, it's always better to use butter since it provides the best flavor. I don't think the extra tenderness would make cinnamon rolls taste any better, to be honest. I've once had a full of flavor cinnamon roll that was just slightly chewy and it was better than any "tender" tasteless bakery roll I've ever had. Go with the butter.