The Fresh Loaf

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Sourdough Version of Richard Bertinet's Pain aux Olive.

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Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

Sourdough Version of Richard Bertinet's Pain aux Olive.

I recently asked TFL how to score Richard Bertinet's Pain aux Olives to achieve the effect shown in his book, Dough: http://www.thefreshloaf.com/keyword/bread-scoring-score-richard-bertinet-pains-gourmands-2006-larousse-olive-bread

I made a version of it this weekend, and they were right: It's rolled and the scored on the vertical.

The original recipe is a straight dough: combine ingredients, bulk ferment, roll dough into a long, flat rectangle, spread with olive paste, roll up, shape roll into bâtard, proof, score on the vertical, bake.

I modified it to use a sourdough preferment (52% prefermented flour) and retardation. Day 1: Make preferment. Day 2: Make dough, bulk ferment, shape, retard. Day 3: Bake. I didn't change the quantities of the original recipe, only the methods.

How did I like it? A lot!

I wrote in my journal: "Favorite bread in the whole wide world = Olive Bread."

Formula.

[Click image for larger version.]

Process.

[Click image for larger version.]

Pictures.

1. Dough scored on the vertical.

2. The result after a 40-minute bake.

3. Here's a side-by-side. Bertinet's is on left. Not to scale: Bertinet's would be 1/3 the size, as he makes three small loaves out of the 875 grams of dough. I made one loaf.

4. The crumb.

Files.

1. Download a copy of the formula in PDF format.

2. Download a copy of the process in PDF format.

3. Download a copy of the spreadsheet in Excel 2007 format. The spreadsheet is editable, so you can use it to scale quantites up or down. You can edit the orange cells; all others cells are automatically calculated from formulae.

Comments

Faith in Virginia's picture
Faith in Virginia

No words can express how awesome that looks.  You did an outstanding job working the slash out.  Congratulations!!!

That's the next bread on my list.

 

thomaschacon's picture
thomaschacon (not verified)

I hope you like it. It's really delicious.

At the end of the post, I added a files section that includes the spreadsheet. You can scale it up to, say, 1000 loaves if you want. ;)

Faith in Virginia's picture
Faith in Virginia

Thanks I got it.  Nice work on the spread sheet.  I had a bit of an issue getting it to open... but I kicked it once and now it works.

Faith

mwilson's picture
mwilson

Looks really delicious. I like olives!

Really good bloom. I like the effect it creates in combination with the rolled dough.

Great job!

Michael

thomaschacon's picture
thomaschacon (not verified)

Thanks, again.

Sorry, for making you repost.

I added a files section at the bottom that includes the spreadsheet. I imagine it'll look strange, though. The BBGA format uses unusual typesface that most won't have installed. It should still work.

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

bread.  Great write up, documentation and pictures.  Since the family detests olives this will be be all for me :-) Will ajve piut it on the mlist.

thomaschacon's picture
thomaschacon (not verified)

I like olives every which way but raw. I'll eat them, but much prefer to cook or bake with them.

Try this bread on them and see if they change their mind.

Bread Nut's picture
Bread Nut

That is one yummy-looking loaf!  What kind of olives did you use -- kalamata?

I'll definitely be making this next.  Thanks for sharing it!

thomaschacon's picture
thomaschacon (not verified)

...but I never bother to remember the names.

I call them the big green ones and the big black (or is it purple) ones.

I used about half of each.

If I were to guess, I'd say the black ones are Kalamata and the green are Picholine.

They looked like the top-left and bottom-left in this image.

I love using salt-cured olives in olive bread, but I have a hard time sourcing them in Colorado. They're all over the place on the west coast, but not so Colorado.

Oh, and thank you!

varda's picture
varda

Looks like an awesome loaf, and great side by side shots.  -Varda

thomaschacon's picture
thomaschacon (not verified)

I had to use Photoshop to get the side-by-side shot to look that way, so I guess I kinda' fudged it.

 

PiPs's picture
PiPs

Hi Thomas,

I love the concept of rolling the olives through the bread. Every slice would be a treat.

Cheers,
Phil

thomaschacon's picture
thomaschacon (not verified)

I thought the olive flavour would be less intense than when using whole olives, but it's more.

I think I like this method better.

Thanks.

Syd's picture
Syd

Gorgeous loaf Thomas.  I love the layering effect of the slashing.  And the juxtaposition of the Buddha in the shot is ingenious:  looks just like his round tummy!  

Nice baking,

Syd

thomaschacon's picture
thomaschacon (not verified)

Buddha was the only prop I could find.

I hope it doesn't offend anyone.

Thanks for the compliment!

isand66's picture
isand66

Great looking bread Thomas...I wish I didn't detest olives so I may have to try substituting something like maybe some roasted peppers:)

Regards.
Ian

Faith in Virginia's picture
Faith in Virginia

I make a bread rolled such as this  but it uses roasted peppers and onions.  It also uses saffron.  Killer good. I will look for for the recipe if you want.   It's in an old book somewhere so it's all in volume measurements. 

Faith

isand66's picture
isand66

Thanks Faith...that would be awesome if you could share your recipe.

 

Faith in Virginia's picture
Faith in Virginia

I looked for the recipe in a book I swear it was in...but it's not.  I will dig it up in one of my hundreds of cook books.  I'll make a new post of it or make a blog of doing it again.  It's a good one. 

thomaschacon's picture
thomaschacon (not verified)

Could it be the one in Breads of the La Brea Bakery?

That's the only one I know.

thomaschacon's picture
thomaschacon (not verified)

Yeah, some people don't like them very much (or capers)(or anything bitter-salty).

I think I only learned to like them when I heard someone say, "A taste for bitter is the sign of a mature palate."

I took that to mean my palate was immature and, sure enough, it was (or I was deluded into thinking so).

I love bitter now. Olives, capers, coffee, really bittersweet chocolate, cocoa, citrus peel like in marmalade, every kind of vinegar, etc.

-

A loaf with roasted red peppers would work (and green onions or leeks), but no Herbs d' Provence (else, rosemary! ack!). I think there's a recipe (fendu shape, if I remember) in Silverton's Breads of the La Brea Bakery.

Thanks for the compliment.

thomaschacon's picture
thomaschacon (not verified)

I had a lot of leftover olive paste, so I made the loaf straight up: mixed dough, bulk fermented, shaped, proofed, bake (all in under 3 hours).

How did 3 hours stack up against 3 days? It didn't.

It had no flavour other than a hint of rye. The olive flavour was about 1/5 the intensity of the previous method. The crust was light, but that's due to limited steaming. The crumb was a shameful, fluffy, air-sponge with neither texture nor no bite and so full of volume you'd think it was the Hindenberg, at least until...oh never ye mind.

Let not its photogenicity fool ye into thinking it tastes of anything but air with a hint of olive.

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

That's for sure!   

Don't know how to save this one... slice thin and brush with garlic olive oil and bake again to toast?  and dip into balsamic vinegar/oil ?

I did take a boaring loaf once and made french toast with the slices, floated them in a clear vegetable soup.  Top with finely hacked chives.  Very Good!

Mini

thomaschacon's picture
thomaschacon (not verified)

I plundered it for the parts that had a lot of olives and then let my dog, Charles, have at it.

I wish I had some now. French toast sounds gute!

Frazestart's picture
Frazestart

About the olives in your photo, could the large green ones be Cerignola (firm and meaty) olives? Picholine are usually smaller-in fact, the smaller, kind of pointy green olives just to the right of the big green ones, look like picholine to me .

Great-looking bread. Thanks for posting.

thomaschacon's picture
thomaschacon (not verified)

They were firm and meaty (and I had to squish them mightily to get those seeds out), so maybe Cerignola.

They weren't small, so I guess they're weren't Picholine.

I saw the small ones in a jar, but then I read the jar ingredients. Nope! Not buying olives that's been stiffed with a pimento and embalmed with preservatives. ;)

Thanks for the compliment.

FlourChild's picture
FlourChild

Beautiful olive bread!  I'll chime in with the others, you've rolled and scored the bread to great effect.  Sounds delicious, too.

thomaschacon's picture
thomaschacon (not verified)

I ate the whole thing too, but don't tell anybody! ;)

(And spent all day today on the bike the burn the calories. Denver, why were you so hot today? It's only April!)

mijo.sq's picture
mijo.sq

Great Loaf! Thank you for the wonderful PDF and Excel!

I saw the first post on the shaping, and wondered whether it would be possible to sprinkle flour on after spreading the filling. I know this technique is to separate the layers in Taiwanese green onion pancakes.

 

thomaschacon's picture
thomaschacon (not verified)

You probably could use flour, but if you use too much near the seam, it might not hold.

Without the help of TFL, I'm sure it would have taken me 10 loaves to figure it out.

Green onion pancakes sound good! :)

Thanks for the compliment.

 

AnnaInMD's picture
AnnaInMD

Bertinet, after spreading the ingredients on the flattened dough, and then folding the dough over to enclose them, he  then cuts a cross, like a plus sign, into the top of the dough and folds the middles under towards the sides to reveal some of the ingredients, and this also produces this look.

AnnaInMD's picture
AnnaInMD

on page 122 of "Dough" and Mr. Bertinet only makes one cut down the middle.

 

thomaschacon's picture
thomaschacon (not verified)

His pain fourré à la tomate, ail, et basilic–bread stuffed with tomato, garlic, and basil–is tasty too. It's almost like a cheeseless pizza or calzone.

I prefer it with sundried tomatoes, though; the fresh cherry tomatoes are still too squishy post bake.

Photo Credit. Bertinet, Richard. Pains gourmands: 50 recettes simples et créatives. Paris: Larousse, 2006. p. 77. Print.

AnnaInMD's picture
AnnaInMD

and fresh basil - can't wait :)

 

thomaschacon's picture
thomaschacon (not verified)

GregS (from: http://www.thefreshloaf.com/comment/reply/28418/214746#comment-214746)

I'm going to make the bread.

When you say "fills the rye dough". I visualize a roll of "paste" filling (like toothpaste?) laid onto a dough rectangle before shaping and then rolled into, say, a batard. Is that anywhere near reality? I see the ingredients, but how are they made into paste and what is the desired texture?

This bears on another part of the format; the Procedure. How and where is any procedure like the paste explained in the BBGA format?

Thanks for your reply and your patience.

GregS

 

I updated the process above to include the Olive Paste as: combine the pitted olives, olive oil, and Herbs de Provence in a blender or food processor and blend it to your desired consistency.

I don't blend it to a "toothpaste" like paste, but almost. I can still see the bits of olives when I'm done.

-

You have the right idea about how to apply it:

After rolling out (or stretching) the dough into the rectangle, you spread the paste evenly across the dough (like spreading jam or jelly on a piece of toast) and then roll it up.

Once it's rolled up, taper the ends to a bâtard (or bâtard-like shape).

-

The BBGA has published a limited amount of information on their format. It's almost like they stopped at the 80% point. I suspect later issues of the Breadlines magazine cover (other parts of) the format in greater detail.

If you're asking about how the BBGA deals with fillings, etc. that are not part of the dough, they do so like I do above, as a separate ingredient. The only difference is that whereas in-dough ingredients are % of total flour, out-of-dough ingredients (like the olive paste) are % of total dough weight.

Download a copy of their magazine to see other examples: http://bbga.dreamhosters.com/files//bbga.18.03%20FINAL.singles.pdf

GregS's picture
GregS

Eureka!

Thank you so much Thomas.

GregS

kazz_42's picture
kazz_42

Hi all, I made this loaf a couple of days ago successfully and took it to work everyone loved it and my family loved it as well. I did the recipe the same as here i rolled the dough out and spread the paste rolled it up and slashed down the middle, the only thing i was disapointed about was that all the olive goodness would fall out of the slash when i sliced the bread and it would fall apart when i ate it. I tried the recipe again yesterday and i mixed the olive oil, olives, and herbs de provence into the dough mixture, but it seemed to be a gooey sticky mess and i couldnt get it to develop any gluten. Are the olives preventing that?

Kristen