The Fresh Loaf

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Dabrownman Butchers Sweetbird’s Lovely Buckwheat, Apple and Apple Cider, Buckwheat Groat Bread with Insane Thoughts and Deeds

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dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Dabrownman Butchers Sweetbird’s Lovely Buckwheat, Apple and Apple Cider, Buckwheat Groat Bread with Insane Thoughts and Deeds

Had to make a couple of changes to Sweetbird’s hugely fantastic, far better than magnificent, Buckwheat Bread recipe that can be found here:

 http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/27784/buckwheatpear-sourdough-pear-hard-cider#comments

 First off we, my apprentice and I, used aWashingtonstate hard apple cider called Spire.  It was their mountain apple draft variety and used 245 g in the dough instead of 230.  We also; did not use any cider in the SD levain and used the excess apple water squeezed from the re-hydrated dried apples and frozen fermented apples from the YW plus some water.  Also used Whole Rye and WW with the Buckwheat in the first SD levain build since our starter had them and we think these grains make better bread when used in levains.   I wanted to taste the cider so I drank 90 g just to make sure it wasn’t spoiled or otherwise not up to the task at hand.

 My apprentice, bless her heart, substituted an Apple / Orange Yeast Water levain instead of SAF instant yeast since we don’t stock any commercial yeasts in the pantry, autolysed 1 hour instead of 30 minutes, sprouted the buckwheat groats instead of scalding them (after making red and 2 white malts she’s into sprouting it seems) and then put them all inside since she reasoned enough stuff would be hanging out in the end anyway.

Because the mix – ins were so wet (compared to sweetbird’s), I added 30 g of BW and 30 g of BF to them and let it autolyse while the dough was doing the same thing, added chopped pistachio nuts and chopped cooked buckwheat soba noodles, added fermented apple pieces saved when refreshing the YW that were previously frozen, re-hydrated the dried apples in apple juice.

 My apprentice also cut the salt to 10 g from 11 since the pistachios seemed salty to her when tasted for poison and she was a little bloaty this morning, added 15 g home made white diastatic malt to the vital wheat gluten, and finally, subbed bread flour for the AP which birdsong recommended doing after her bake.

 So, not much at all really major changed in the scheme of things we call bread.  We agree with sweetbrird that the dough needs 2 S & F sessions at 40 and 80 minutes and another to pre-shape at 2 hours.  Do a quick S & F to form into a ball.  Drag the skin tight and put into your large floured benetton.  Place into a plastic bag and let it final proof for at least an hour or so.  You can get your oven ready at 500 F with your steaming method in place while it proofs.  My final proof was 1 ½ hours about twice as long as sweetbird’s and it was not over proofed.

 The bread was turned out onto parchment on a peel and slashed with my patented ‘angry face with really nasty eyes design,’ steamed for 20 minutes at 430 F, then the steam was removed.  The bread then baked on the stone for about another 45 minutes until it reached 203 F and then left in oven for 12 minutes with the door ajar and oven off.

Will post the recipe later if somone wants it.  This boule finished weight was 1,305 g.

Comments

PMcCool's picture
PMcCool

So, Dr. Brownmanstein, what would you call your creation?

Paul

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

'Buckwheat's Angry Madness' fits :-)  I was trying to make a smile with eyes but who knew it was .........alive, was  mad as hell and want to eat its master instead of the other way around!!!  Oh no !!!!........aaahhhhhh......

isand66's picture
isand66

Thats some pretty fancy looking bread DA!  Great job...look forward to seeing the crumb shot.  I like that smile too.

 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

fruit and nuts the crumb wasn't too bad.  This bread tastes great.  I usually have 1 piece of bread at dinner but I had 2 tonight and these were really big - one was toasted with butter and one was plain.  For a man eating, evil boule  -  it went down way too easy, with barely a whimper - Sad really :-)

So how did your DSnyder SFSD come out?

 

isand66's picture
isand66

Came out pretty good.  Not as sour tasting as I expected.

The loaves were so big I couldn't fit them onto my baking stone, so one loaf was kind of hanging off the ledge and came out a little lopsided.

I will post them tonight.  Bringing one into work to share the wealth.

isand66's picture
isand66

That crumb looks pretty good to me!  Nice and moist and open.

isand66's picture
isand66

Thats some pretty fancy looking bread DA!  Great job...look forward to seeing the crumb shot.  I like that smile too.

 

jdchurchill's picture
jdchurchill

ayo you mention that you used homemade white diastatic malt.   would you mind explaining or linking me to how you make that?  nice looking stuff!

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

the link to how I make non-diastatic Red Rye Malt.  The only difference comes in at the drying stage.  To make diastatic malt, when drying, instead of starting at a low temperature and raising it over time to 350 F making red malt you start at a low temperature 125 F and keep it there for 2-3 hours until the berries are dry and then grind them - making white diastatic malt instead.  You can make barley malt too this way.

I have made white malt another way too.  After 4 days of sprouting, I allowed the berries to dry naturally rolled up in a dry paper towel for another 4 days and then dried them in 125 F oven for abut 2 hours.  I think the 2nd way produced better malt  but it takes twice as long and I have no way to prove it is better.

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/27954/making-red-rye-malt#comments

Salilah's picture
Salilah

So, not much at all really major changed in the scheme of things we call bread

ROFL!

I wanted to taste the cider so I drank 90 g just to make sure it wasn’t spoiled or otherwise not up to the task at hand

Agree, that is really important I think when using alcohol in beer...

A fun recipe - thanks for posting!

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

most welcome.  It is a fun , if slightly less complicated and evil, recipe.  As long as the bread comes out tasting great, nasty looks don't matter.  Jacques Pepin always said that you had to taste the wine before putting it in the food just in case it has been tampered with and not up to snuff.  I always take his advice when it comes to booze and food.  His wise advice has not let me down, although it has knocked me down on occasion :-)

varda's picture
varda

DA,  I wouldn't want to run into that loaf in the dark.   Interesting mix of ingredients.   Looks like it came out really well.  -Varda

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

sleep last night just having it in the house!  It is a unique and delicious tasting bread.  The YW helped in the spring too.  The strangest thing was that the color of the fermenting dough, light tanish lavender, was almost the same color as the inside of my antique dough bowl it was developing itself in - karma should not be underestimated when dealing with living organisms.

I was telling sweetbread, when she posted her bread, that I loved buckwheat soba noodles.  I have them on hand and put them in all kinds of orential soup.  They were the same odd transluescent color too.  The purple and green of the pistachios was a fit on opposite ends of designer's color wheel and they are grotesquely under used in bread - a trait that also eventually worked in that dark alleys and mean streets  we call .............The Oddities of Strange Experimental Bread Baking :-)

 

sweetbird's picture
sweetbird

This is hilarious. It's like reading a humorous version of "Frankenstein." My smile got wider and wider as I read through all the extra ingredients that got tossed into the mix on this one. Not to mention the extra ingredients that got tossed into the baker and his faithful sidekick!!:) Quite a concoction! Varda's comment makes me laugh, too. It is a dark and fierce looking old boule, but I'm really glad in the end you have something you like the taste of!

Janie

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

that a sweetbird would inspire such evilness in bakers and their apprentices?  Another talent unearthed the old fashioned way  - scientific and possibly medical experimentation :-)

This was such a fun bake, at least it was till old, evil, nasty face appeared at the end, with so many new and interesting indredients to work with and enjoy tasting along the way. 

There is something I would change about this bake though.  Instead of buying one bottle of Spire, I would buy the 9 pack of a Vermont hard cider called Woodchuck or something like that.  It was a variety pack of 3 different ciders for only 10 bucks.  Had I known it tasted so good, the bread would never have made it to the oven.

Thanks for your recipe and help with the buckwheat ....... peculiarities.

sweetbird's picture
sweetbird

I'm still grinning about your wild buckwheat bake.

Yes, do get the Woodchuck cider from Vermont!! That's the brand I use and it's wonderful . . . for breads and bakers and apprentices alike!

Signed sincerely. . . Sweetbird, the buckwheat enabler

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

as bad or as funny (looking back on it) as my very first blog post on TFL where I butchered David Snyder's San Joaquin baking method and nearly burned down the house in the process.

He said my experiece that day, proves he has a 'fool proof' recipe

Floydm's picture
Floydm

Wow, that is truly an awe inspiring loaf.  Nice job, dabrownman.

-Floyd

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

I was inspired by sweetbird's fantastic bread and now you are too.  Isn't that one, of many things, that TFL is all about?  I just love this site and community and regret not finding it long ago.

Thanks for your awe  - and fine  comments :-)

Bake On!

isand66's picture
isand66

So....did you actually taste the Soba Noodles in the bread? I can't tell if those are the nuts or the noodles trying to escape from their prison....

 

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

separately, per se,  since they are nothing but buckwheat flour and water that taste just like the buckwheat bread itself.  But,  they do add moisture to the crumb for sure AND, they sure do look very cool on the surface of the bread during bulk ferment, in the benetton and in the bread.  Looking cool is very important for male bakers, nearly as important as six pack abs and Popeye fore arms, as you well know -  nearly as important as being able to herd 5 cats :-)

The nuts are green and purple, not a good thing normally..........but better than blue :-)

You are right.   Everything is trying to escape that mad faced, insane boule which, I assure you,  is hell bent to eat anything that comes near it - so be careful as NY is not far enough away from AZ!

fermento's picture
fermento

...is all very well, but evil bread might open up a whole new genre on TFL!

Looks terrific.

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

I'm thinking that we should revisit this bread around October 30th or so - to commorate All Hallows Eve and vampires everywhere but, we will need large and sharp teeth to show up on those dreary grins then - No?  We may have to get Ian do that fancy slashing and other blood letting then.  I bet he already has or needs another black cat too! 

Terrific, as great as it appears, is only 'face deep' they say and they, who ever they are, would know better than us since we are generally clueless about these......strange things.

I say we do an 'Evil Face' bake off in late October to please the gods and hope no one dies an ugly death for not appeasing them properly or who knows..........anything odd is possible on those evil days. 

I'm nearly sure that something like this was the creative, all knowing, evil force behind Green Goddess dressing - don't you think so too?

We may be safe till late fall, if I keep this gruesomely faced  bread in the freezer but then....... all bets are off.  The Nasty Boule  will be .....egregiously called forth to do...... unatural and evil things........to those........who........

fermento's picture
fermento

... to Dr!

But are you confusing fermenting with fomenting?   : )

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

between foaming and bubbling Dr.?  I don't want to find out - at least not yet.

isand66's picture
isand66

I have 1 black with white and one white with black....I could borrow my friends solid black cat for inspiration though!

A black bean bread could fit the bill served with some of your "Blood Orange" jam.....