The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Pips Vollkornbrot - Nearly 100% Rye with A Tiny Bit of Spelt

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dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Pips Vollkornbrot - Nearly 100% Rye with A Tiny Bit of Spelt

I pretty much followed Phil's post, except my pan was 4 x 2 3/8 x 8 and much smaller in height, so I baked it less time at 2 higher temp and added a lower setting that Phil didnlt use.  I did 45 min at 375 F, 45 min at 300 F and 30 min at 225 F. When I checked the middle of this small loaf was 210 F so I called it done and let it sit in the oven with door ajar oven off for 10 minutes.  205 F would have been a better internal temperature for sure but you can't get everything you want.  It smelled great right out of the oven, not as dark as Phil's due in part to to my rye berries not being very dark ones at all.

When it rose and inch in 30 min starting at the 2 hour mark of final proofing and started to crack, like Phil said it would as a signal to bake it off, I put it in the oven.  I did wait 2 days to cut and try a slice as Phil recommended, but I'm sure 1 day wouldn't make that much difference would it?.  The crust was firm but not hard.  The loaf was easy to cut in 1/4" slices - no worry.  The crumb was actually airy with small holes throughout.  It was also soft yet still chewy, moist and just plain delicious.  Buttered and lightly toasted was also exactly what i expected.  After marketing, selling and delivering Rubschlager Rye Breads for 20 years, I have a taste for fine rye breads and this one reminds me of Rubschlager Rye Breads only more rustic and chewy.  It also looks more rustic than Phil's crumb too.  Maybe I had a larger granules in the soak and scald? It is a keeper for sure.

Here is a lonk to Rubschlager   http://www.rubschlagerbaking.com/

I am very happy with Phil's Rye as a first try at a 100% rye (if you discount the spelt) for me - thanks for all of your help Phil and Jay (longhorn). It was really not bad at all as long as you are ready and can handle the wetter mass of the dough.  I just floured up my hands and board and shaped on it, plopped it in the oil sprayed pan seam side down and smoothed out the top.  I am glad I was only doing small loaf :-)   Since no high temps required I baked it in my mini oven on a sheet pan, with a larger loaf pan over the top of the aluminum foil covered smaller pan that had the bread in it.  When I bake this again I am going to double the baking time and reduce the heat even further following Phil's advise again.  I think I might try one of Andy's rye breads next if I can find one not too difficult.  Here are some pix's.

 

Comments

goodforbusiness's picture
goodforbusiness

Wow, looks wonderful! You've inspired me to work up the courage to try a 100% rye myself! :)

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

you should try it too.   I just followed the advice and recipes of Phil and others and it wasn't a big deal once you get used to a gloppy sticky dough.    It is pretty good bread.

isand66's picture
isand66

Add some Thousand Island Dressing and maybe some melted cheese.......not that your lunch doesn't look good too!

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

Well,  I do cure and make my own pastrami.  Have some in the freezer too I'm guessing - melted cheese is no problem.  Tomorrow's lunch is shaping up  pretty quick.  The Dijon mustard is done too.  Maybe I should make you a sandwich just in case you show up :-)   So what is the next bread on your bake list Ian ?

isand66's picture
isand66

Sadly I must work to afford the flour for my daily bread!  I have always wanted to make my own pastrami so I would love to hear how you do yours.

I just posted a sourdough corn bread so please check that one out and I'm waiting for my Onion Ciabatta to come out of the oven.  I just realized I forgot I was going to add some cheese inside, but I guess that will have to wait until next time.  I added some spelt flour which is becoming one of my favorites and used French style flour from KAF. I will post it this weekend or tomorrow.

Regards,
Ian

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

comment on spelt and cooking it in a rice cooker on this thread.  I didn't have enough spelt berries for this bread so I used some farro a close cousin.  There wasn't much anyway.  I think 5-10% of spelt or farro helps any rye or WW bread.  I just kind of throw it into everything now a days.  I made the pastrami cure years ago . I will have tog back and see what I did.  The process is just basic pickling except you are using meat.  I will get back to you on it.   Pastrami cures are one of the most guarded secrets in the food work=ld for some reason.  I could hardly ever get a chef to tell me what they put in their cure or what they actually did to make pastrami in 30 years.  Maybe we need a pastrami site like TFL where secrets are revealed.  I'll check out your cornbread.  I've got another YW white bread that isn't white that  I am working on this morning.

nicodvb's picture
nicodvb

Dan! The bread came out very well. Welcome to the dark side:)

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

isn't too bad on the dark side if you can see some light once in awhile.  Call me DA, everyone else does and ....my name isn't Dan - no worry.

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

Last month I cooked two cups of spelt berries in my rice cooker.  I first soaked overnight and then cooked them like rice and after a little while, a rich caramel aroma drew my attention back to the steaming grain.  I discovered the bottom dry, caramel about the tub but the berries were not cooked thru so I added some more water, stirred well (the aroma!) to dissolve the caramel off the tub sides and let them continue cooking until they had soaked up all the water and were cooked thru.  I wish I would have taken better notes.

They were a rich dark brown and I let them cool and tucked them tightly covered into the fridge.  There they stayed fresh for over two weeks until I used them!  Not a sign of mold growth or anything!   I was flabbergasted to say the least and thought I'd pass this little trick on to you.  Sort of gives the jump on the caramelizing of whole berries for this type of bread.

Mini

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

That is a great idea MiniOven!  I don't think bringing the berries to he boil and letting them cool down cooks them or enough or caramelizes them at all.  Not only do I have a mini oven of my own, that makes some breads very well, I also have a rice cooker doing nothing but sitting in the garage taking up space.  I suppose you started with 2 C of water for 1 C of grains but that wasn't enough?

If you start taking notes, or worse pictures,  when using a rice cooker I will start worrying about you :-)

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

berries and then thought it was good not to include it all in one shot or I might not have had the caramel flavour.  I did stir the then dry berries to clean out anything sticking in the bottom of the pot.  Can't let the good stuff go to waste.  I do remember resetting the rice cooker to "cook" (as opposed to "warm")  after adding some extra water.  They weren't soggy or mushy and still had a tiny bit of "bite" left in them when finished.   

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

also think that you could saute the cooked berries to dry them out while concentrating the caramelization scraped from the cooker.  I too do not like wasting any flavor and brown means flavor every time.   It makes sense to only add half the water to start and watch to make sure it doesn't burn but gets a little brown and then add more water  to liquify the caramelization (spell checker says criminalization is better - they finally tracked me down) )and get it on the rice where it belongs.  I will try some combination of this the next time I do a really rye bread and think it will make it taste better and the texture better.  I am also going for at least a 4 hour bake at a low temperature too.

I just love my table top Mini Oven by the way.  Since it does both bake and convection, it is very convenient, quite useful and a good baker.  The loaf I bake today will be 3 in row for it.   Great for summers in AZ when you don't want any heat in the house - ever.  I just plug it in on the patio!