The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

I just don't get this

  • Pin It
Cooky's picture
Cooky

I just don't get this

In re pain a l'ancienne -- which I have attempted a couple of times with okay results -- I have no problem with the instructions from various sources, but this one bit from a number of sources about the just-before-shaping stage just leaves me scratching my head:

 

<Roll the dough gently in the sprinkled flour to coat it thoroughly, simultaneously stretching it into an oblong about 8 inches long and 6 inches wide.>

 

Roll *and sretch into an oblong* simultaneously? I cannot get that picture in my mind. Roll, I got. Stretch, I got. But both at the same time? I thought originallly that the idea was to mainpulate the dough as little as possible, much less pull off this maneuver.

 

Anybody have a video clip illustrating this particular part of the technique? I would be so mad crazy grateful, you don't even know.

 

 

FumblingFoodie's picture
FumblingFoodie

Here's my most recent Pain a l'ancienne:
http://fumblingfoodie.typepad.com/fumblingfoodie/2007/03/pain_a_lancienn.html
This dough is pretty wet, so by 'rolling the dough gently in the sprinkled four' you are just lightly coating the surface of the dough so you can work with it without it sticking to your hands.  I just gently roll the blob of dough around on the table.
Once you've done that then start gently working and stretching the dough out into the 6 x 8 oblong.
However you do it, I wouldn't worry about it too much.  It's really hard to screw this dough up.

zolablue's picture
zolablue

Since this dough is more like ciabatta dough I don't really do that.  I bascially sprinkle with flour and gently cut so as not to degas.  So I would not worry about those instructions.

Susan's picture
Susan

No one mentioned frottage, nor WOULD anyone in polite conversation!!!! Hehehehe hahahaha! Frissage, FRISSAGE! I'm still laughing, and will be all day long. Thanks.

Susan (who is feeling rather impolite right now)

mse1152's picture
mse1152

Susan, I gulped when I read that too.  Couldn't think of a good way to address it, but I see you found one....  8)

Sue 

Cooky's picture
Cooky

Thanks for the tips, FF and zolablue. And, sourdough-guy, thanks for the giggle! 

 

"I am not a cook. But I am sorta cooky."

comn's picture
comn

I had to google that.... I don't think I want anyone doing that to my bread.

bwraith's picture
bwraith

Well, I thought frisage, however it may be spelled, was a useful technique for quickly mixing up the dough. The use of the term to describe mixing the dough using the heal of the hand to press out the dough is mentioned and explained in numerous places if you google it, although it is spelled various ways. The Danielle Forestier video on the Julia Child site shows using the heal of her hand to press out the mix to quickly remove lumps and mix the ingredients. It works well for me, so I thought I'd mention it in the recipes I posted. But great let's all have a good laugh about it.

I never mentioned that other term above in any of my own posts on the site, so don't bother reading my recipes hoping to be entertained. They only describe how I made the bread, pretty boring stuff.

I agree with FF's interpretation of the ciabatta instructions. It's just saying to dust the cut ends, either by gently rolling them in or dusting them with flour. After that, you can stretch them out as mentioned. I find it also helps to dimple the dough similar to what you might do with a focaccia. I helps to keep the holes from getting out of control.