The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Chinese Cheesecake?

dablues's picture
dablues

Chinese Cheesecake?

Does anyone know what type of dessert this is?  I asked someone at the China Star Super Buffet and they say it's cheesecake.  It doesn't taste like any chessecake that I've had before.  The inside is light and airy and I think a hint of lemon is in there but don't know what other ingredients could be there.  The outside is Phyllo.  I've looked all over the internet to find some sort of recipe but haven't found anything that resembles this.  I hope the photos are ok.  I sliced one in half and took a picture to show what the filling is like

 

 

 

Felila's picture
Felila

That looks like rice cake. Several manapua shops here in Honolulu sell varieties of rice cake. The Chinese versions are very different from the Japanese mochi that I sometimes make at home.

dablues's picture
dablues

Thanks so much for the reply.  Will look for a recipe for rice cakes.  I haven't a clue why they call them chessecakes.

Felila's picture
Felila

Rice cakes are usually made from glutinous rice. You can buy that as a kind of rice flour (mochiko), which makes a dense, even-textured sweet.  I have the impression that the Chinese rice cakes aren't made from anything like mochiko, but from glutinous rice that has been boiled and then pounded. I have the impression that this requires special equipment and that it is something done by professional cooks, not at home. BUT I could be wrong. Couldn't find out much about Chinese rice cakes online.

dablues's picture
dablues

for the reply.  I kind of think, but am probably wrong, that these were baked in muffin cups.  Am not sure about the filling how it was made though.  Looks to me with the browning on top that either it was put under a broiler for a bit or torched.  But am probbly wrong on that too.  My husband seems to like the filling a lot.  Light and airy and not really sweet with just a hint of lemon flavor.

dablues's picture
dablues

any recipe that comes close to this. I've tried a couple of recipes using the sticky rice flour but it wasn't anything like the picture above.  I just can't figure out the ingredients.  I know it has to be simple, but I can't think of how to make it.  The inside is very creamy and has a nice taste.  Just can't figure it out.  Will keep on looking.

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

a lemon mochi variant?  I've had mochi that tastes, looks and has the mouth feel of imitation crab :-)  A sort of rice lemon cheesecake is no problem at all.

dablues's picture
dablues

Thanks, I'll have to look on the internet and see if I can find a recipe for Mochi that kind of looks like what I want.  Hopefully, Mochi is it. 

jimrich17's picture
jimrich17

The dough looks more like a double layer of  wonton wrapper or egg roll wrapper than phyllo- which would be much thinner. It is hard from the photo to tell how big the pastry is. If mini-then probably the wonton wrapper. If larger then the springroll. There are lots of recipes for Chinese Egg Custard Tarts. THe shiny brown top is most likely a glaze applied after baking.

Hope this helps. It looks like an idea that should be followed up on.

Jim

dablues's picture
dablues

Possibly it could be a spring roll but I am not sure.  Anyway I just can't seem to find the right recipe for this.  I've saved some recipes that I'll try.  Some mochi, some egg tarts.  This is so annoying since the recipe is probably really simple but if I don't know exactly what's in it, then it won't come out right.  I tried a regular rice cake and it wasn't the right one.  The inside of this dessert is very soft, and creamy, but it doesn't look like a egg tart.  I'll do the couple of recipes I saved and try them and if it's not the right one, will keep on looking, lol!  The glaze part is probably right.  I do know that these need to be eaten warm.  If it's not eaten right away they will shrink down.  I bought a couple extra to show someone and they shrunk down a lot.  Thanks for all the help.

dablues's picture
dablues

There is Mayonaisse in the pastry that's all  I could find out from the restaurant, but I really don't think it is phyllo dough but could be wrong.

gerhard's picture
gerhard

Just from looking at the photo it looks like fortune cookie dough, I agree it doesn't look like phyllo pastry as the sheets seem fairly thick.

Gerhard

dablues's picture
dablues

There are two wrappers in the dessert, and each one is thin and crisp.  Not sure if it's a won ton wrapper or not, but I know it isn't phyllo dough.  Don't know if they used won ton wrappers and rolled them out a bit or just put them in the muffin tins and rotated the second one to get points.

 

Egg Tart's picture
Egg Tart

I have been looking for a recipe for these tasty gems too!  I asked at our local Chinese what they were called... Egg tart was as close as language differences could come.  But like the picture, these used wonton for the cup, and the custard is moist, sweet with a citrus tinge.  One time we found what we thought was a wee bit of pineapple.  I don't think it's a rice thing.  It's a baked egg custard.  And yes, probably baked in a cupcake tin.  Whatever they are, they're served warm and delicious!  If anyone finds a recipe, please post!f

dablues's picture
dablues

I never did find a recipe, and the Chinese buffet where I go to call them cheesecake.  I've looked forever and cannot come up with anything.  I did make a Japanese Cotton Cheesecake to see what that was like, and it was about the closest I could come to what I am looking for.  I'm going to try the Japanese Cotton Cheesecake again in the near future but am going to tweak the recipe since the consistency wasn't quite the same as the pastry I got at the Chinese buffet. 

dablues's picture
dablues

I never did find a recipe, and the Chinese buffet where I go to call them cheesecake.  I've looked forever and cannot come up with anything.  I did make a Japanese Cotton Cheesecake to see what that was like, and it was about the closest I could come to what I am looking for.  I'm going to try the Japanese Cotton Cheesecake again in the near future but am going to tweak the recipe since the consistency wasn't quite the same as the pastry I got at the Chinese buffet.  One other thing, I asked a waitress the other day what they used for the wrapper.  I wasn't sure if it was a won ton or not.  She said spring roll wrapper, so I'm not sure but I'm going to try to use one of those.

Slhawk1981's picture
Slhawk1981

After digging.. bc I too loves these.. I believe it might be chinese egg CAKE baked in springroll wrappers.. google chinese egg cake.. there's a recipe.. 

dablues's picture
dablues

I will check it out and see if I can find the recipe and if it is the one I'm looking for.  I have been looking for the proper recipe since I first posted this question and as of this date haven't found what I was looking for.  Hopefully, this will be the day it will work out.  If not, then will forge on.

Egg Tart's picture
Egg Tart

I probably should have re-thought choosing my handle.  It really sounds like I'm an extra big fan of eggs..... 8-)

Anyway, the sweet that I'm looking for is the exact one that is pictured above.  Very custardy, but spongy and light as well, with those little holes all through.  The top gets slightly sticky, with the sugar baking out.  The little custard egg tarts I see online are a bright yellow, as if they're made from just the yoke.  But these are a pale yellow.  Really, the only picture I can come up with online that looks exactly like what I'm searching for, is the original one from dablues.  8-)  I will also say that these would not be sold in a shop, pre packaged in any way.  They're made fresh and served warm.  I'm getting so hungry......

dablues's picture
dablues

I have looked for egg cakes like what was posted here.  Still am not sure egg cakes is the right thing.  I downloaded a couple recipes for egg cakes, baked and steamed but don't know if it's what I'm looking for.  I've spent a few years trying to find out what the recipe is.  The china buffet calls it cheesecake but it doesn't taste like cheesecake.  I make cheesecake so I know the difference.  Also I think they buy them, and then bake them, since I see they take them out of the oven.  Wish I could find the exact recipe.  Yes, it is custardy and spongy with little holes throughout.  I just love them so much.  I tried a few recipes a few years back but they did not compare to the ones at the china star buffet and they won't tell me where they get them from.

 

Tammy Perry's picture
Tammy Perry

I have had these at our local buffet and the minute I tasted it I knew it was the same flavor and texture as what my dad called egg pie. I have never been able to find his recipe to make for myself. Until finding them at the local buffet I had not had anything other than pie custards. They use mayo instead of butter for fat in the recipe though; I guess to save money. I have never been able to find anything but custard recipes and I know my dad did not use any milk in his pie. I dont think the buffet uses any milk either. I would love to find someone who has just an egg pie recipe NOT an egg custard recipe.

dablues's picture
dablues

I tried getting the recipe a long time ago from China Star Buffet.  All I could get, was egg, milk, mayo, flour.  No amounts, etc.  Tried figuring it out but it didn't come out right at all.  This is so frustrating since I love the pastry so much.  As a matter of fact had one today at China Star Buffet.  I have searched off and on since I first posted my request.  That was a long time ago, and looked through so many recipes made me dizzy.  Nothing comes close to the picture above.  Was surprised I got any info from them.  A waitress asked someone in the kitchen and came back with a piece of paper stating, eggs, milk, flour, mayo.  That was it.  Also, is it won ton wrappers they use for holding the filling?  I know it's not puff pastry, and wonder is it steamed first then put in the shell and baked to brown it?  The filling is so light and airy and very moist.  If you ever find the recipe please let me know. 

dablues's picture
dablues

It's not Egg Pie either.  I about give up.  The only other thing I can say to see if anyone can figure out what this is, is that the filling is very, moist.  I'm at a loss since I am sure the ingredients are simple but if you don't have the right ingredients, and the right technique nothing will work.

Sparklerox's picture
Sparklerox

Are you in New England? I suspect this is the New England version of a traditional egg tart:  much fluffier and in a wonton wrapper instead of flaky pastry. I've seen it called egg tart or cheese tart here in Massachusetts. Maybe it's made with whipped egg whites, since it is so much fluffier than a traditional egg tart. Once in a while I'll detect a hint of pineapple in one.

Here's a picture I took of one back when I started searching for this recipe myself. Very soft and moist, but with a texture that's creamy but kinda crumbly. I'm almost 100% sure it's baked in a wonton wrapper in a muffin tin.

dablues's picture
dablues

That does look similar but the inside appears more dense. No I'm in Georgia.  Born & raised in New York State, but my grandparents were from MA, and I spent a lot of time in MA.  I'm sure it's baked in a Muffin Tin, but no matter what recipe I try or look for it isn't the same.  This is so frustrating. 

Egg Tart's picture
Egg Tart

Hi, that looks very much like the ones we're talking about.  And the hint of pineapple is a trait that some of us have noted.  I don't think it's a New England thing, since we're in Ohio.  Yours looks a bit drier than ours, maybe.

Most of the egg tarts that you can see on Google are in thick pastry cups, and the filling looks nothing like this.  If you Google for Egg Tart, you'll see thousands of the pastry ones, with very yellow filling and no caramelization.  Just not the same thing.

The caramelization is important - the fine bubble structure is another. They're also the taste of the pineapple, and these are more sweet than a normal egg custard.  And they're almost buttery.....

I really don't think the bubbles come from whipping - if that were the case, the bubbles would rise to the top, and the top of the tart would be frothy, and the bottom would have no bubbles.  These have well-distributed airy bubbles.  I think there's some leavening agent being used.

At first, I called them egg custards, but our Chinese place has both - normal egg custard, served cold, and the texture is nothing like these....and they're served warm.

 

 

Sparklerox's picture
Sparklerox

Yes, I know what the Google results look like. Other egg dishes such as souffle and custards use whipped egg whites and don't have the layers you're talking about. The texture of these egg tarts look VERY much like an egg souffle. I'll probably start experimenting with a recipe like this one and use elements of traditional egg tarts.

https://princesspinkygirl.com/egg-cheese-souffle/2/

dablues's picture
dablues

The one you see in the original post doesn't have any hint of pineapple in it at all.  I love pineapple so I would have noticed.  I bought one to take home years back and was going to bring it to a Chinese store, which I did, to see if the woman who owned the store knew what it was.  She didn't!  Plus, I always wondered why they only put a few out at a time, because they deflate.  By the time I got to the Store which was the next day, if I remember correctly the filling was almost gone, since it deflated so much.  So evidently when making these, they need to be eaten that day.  I know they Chinese Buffet where we go bakes them in the oven, and I think they might get them frozen, or fresh delivered and they either need to bake them or warm them up.  Not sure.  You can see some of the kitchen and I saw them removing those from the oven.  I'm going to try and make steamed rice cake, and them carmelize them, but I doubt very much that's what it is.  The only reason why I'm going to steam them is I've seen a few videos and most of them show them steaming the rice cakes but never carmelization, and never in a wrapper.  Will continue looking.  Thanks for replying.

dablues's picture
dablues

I don't think they are coconut tarts.  Definitely not egg tarts.  I did see a video of a girl making rice cakes that she colored with food coloring.  The inside from what I could tell looked similar.  She does add coconut milk, and coconut flour.  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xzOOlXw3Y4I  I don't this is it so I'll keep on looking.

Yippee's picture
Yippee
dablues's picture
dablues

Thanks but it's not those.  I saw these before.  Guess I'll never get the recipe or anything close to it.  Thanks for helping me out.

Yippee's picture
Yippee

and disappointed - as if this is a dessert I'm trying to make...

kellyon's picture
kellyon

agree with Felila that it looks like rice cake. Thanks for the great idea, want to test my new oven that I found at https://www.choice.co.nz/category/920/equipment/convection-ovens. Prefer to use only professional equipment at my kitchen. Found one great recipe of Rice Cooker Cheesecake here.

 

 

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

:).  With tapioca flour not the "pearls."

Had an interesting cream in a variant of a Cardinal dessert,  was a combination of bottled coffee cream and yogurt and tasted like caramel cream.

Another thought... is it possible that the wrapper was first brushed inside with a sugar syrup or lemon jam, filled and brushed with syrup on top?   

I was reading this recipe and wondering what would happen if it was made individual and baked instead.  It has been my observation that many Asian desserts emulate Viennese specialties.  Could this also be a cross cultural experience?   Keep in mind that many Asians are lactose sensitive making substitutions for milk products, coconut milk comes to mind.

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

with home made lemon spring roll wrappers in a small spring form pan and call it Mini Yippee Delights :-)

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

why stop there?   tack on ... of Dablues

dablues's picture
dablues

I will check out Tapioca Cake, and the links listed.  I am so frazzled over this since I know it is a recipe that should be easy, but if you don't have the right ingredients it won't come out the same.  Again, I asked what the dessert was called.  They said Cheesecake when I first asked a few years ago, but decided with new help to ask again.  The girl didn't understand what I wanted so she got the owner to come over.  So, I asked him.  His answer was it's too complicated to tell you and as for the dough part he said you can't get it in the USA.  Didn't make sense to me since he has the desserts there.  I asked him if it was like rice paper he said yes, but am not sure if that is right.  So will forge on, and follow the links and see if that is what I'm looking for.  Thanks to all who is trying to help me find the proper recipe to make this luscious dessert, lol!  I'm sure it's easy once I get the right ingredients.  Tapicoa cake and rice cake sounds interesting so definitely will check it out.  I know it is not a custard and extremely moist and light, and not very sweet.

Egg Tart's picture
Egg Tart

Thanks for sending the links, Yippee.  I couldn't open some of them, but thanks for looking so hard.

But....there's no coconut at all.....and while there is a trace of something citrus and many people say it's pineapple, it is not pineapple like in the link. No chunks of fruit, like those.   One time I found the tiniest piece of what seemed to be a bit of pineapple. But otherwise, no chunks of anything.

Isn't it funny that we've gathered together in search of this small, elusive treat?  If I could, I would mail one to each of you!!

Wyndrake's picture
Wyndrake

I live in NY state and most China buffets have something similar.  Egg custard baked in edible rice paper.  They put a piece of pineapple in the middle sometimes.  They are moist and delicious.  The buffet labels them egg custard. 

dablues's picture
dablues

Would you have a picture?  The ones down here isn't a custard filling.  I'll look up egg custard but don't think that's going to show what I want. The elusive dessert.  I can't stand it.  I'm sure the recipe is simple but if you don't have the right ingredients, and how they bake it, it won't come out right

Phigment's picture
Phigment

I live in Tulsa and we used to have a Chinese buffet that had these exact same tarts. I tried for a long time to find the recipe and never had any success.  I'll for following this thread going forward.  If I find anything I'll post it.

dablues's picture
dablues

Thanks if you can find the recipe I'll be doing a Happy Dance!  Been looking for the recipe since 2012, and all suggestions of what it is, still haven't found the proper recipe.  Please post if you do.  

Tink'sWings's picture
Tink'sWings

I came across this delicious item at a Chinese restaurant in Sedalia, MO and just like everyone else I can't find the recipe.  My thought was that it is close to the German Pancake but with sugar added and more flour.  May have to test those thoughts out.  If I do,  I'll post my findings.

dablues's picture
dablues

Please post if you decide to try and make the product to see if it is the same thing.  

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

maybe the shell is using fortune cookie dough, it would be sweet and crisp and shaped when hot over, perhaps an "x" ended beating stick.  The same one used to beat egg whites and oil into mayonnaise.

Tink'sWings's picture
Tink'sWings

Nope.  Epic failure.  Still visiting the Chinese restaurant when able.

80sforever's picture
80sforever

You say they're custardy, then deny they're custard... China King Buffet in Woodbridge, VA labels them Egg Custard.  You say egg yolks color custard too yellow... perhaps substituting mayonnaise for milk lightens the color.  Egg roll/wonton wrappers are too thick... spring roll wrappers are thin enough not to crack in muffin cups.

Considering how browned and greasy they are, I thought they were fried... recipes for Spanish/Venetian fried custard have potential; lemon zest flavors them.  Instead of cutting and coating in beaten egg and bread crumbs, let the custard set in springroll wrapper-lined muffin cups, carefully lift out and fry.

The most similar looking Chinese egg custard recipe I found online is http://www.taste.com.au/recipes/chinese-custard-tarts/11c438f0-68d4-493c-8f88-36db96151f19  Springroll wrappers save time compared to rolling out puff pastry, an obvious advantage for restaurants.

No matter what they're called, these aren't healthful!

dablues's picture
dablues

Hi, they aren't greasy but moist.  This isn't a custard at all.  Seems more like a cake texture that is really most and very airy almost like a sponge cake but it isn't that.  I'm so tired of trying everything and getting no where but appreciate all the help everyone has given me. 

dablues's picture
dablues

 After ALL these years I still have NOT found what I am looking for.  Dabrownman you state rice lemon cheesecake of sort would you have any links for that type of recipe.  So tired of searching the net, trying recipes and not being what I want.  I've tried a lot of different types of Chinese/Japanese desserts but so far doesn't come close.  This is utterly frustrating, since I am sure these recipe is very simple but if you don't know exactly what is in it, it won't come out right.

clazar123's picture
clazar123

 Every cook has their nemesis. Mine is Biscoff cookies- the kind some of the airlines hand out here in the USA. I cannot get a good recipe but I am getting close and I got closer by making observations.

First of all- the obvious. Can you get any more information from the restaurant where you first encountered this delicacy? Where I am from, the buffet restaurants often buy the desserts frozen from a supplier. I know that is not where you want to go but it may answer a few questions.

Are there any Chinese/Asian bakeries near you? If you travel to San Francisco, there are several. Look for comparisons.

On to observations.:

Asian desserts often have much more sugar than European desserts, I have found. The topping on this tart looks like a torched sugar. It is so much browner than the rest of the tart. Is it separate sugar sprinkled on or part of the sugar in the coating? If you have found a recipe that is similar, try increasing the sugar.

Those are definitely wonton skins-thicker than phyllo dough. Either would be delicious.

The "crumb" looks very wet and almost translucent. I believe there is either corn starch or rice flour in the custard. Regular flour would be more opaque.

I don't see any bits of lemon zest so the lemon must come from lemon juice.

There is a fluffy, hole-y structure. That can come from egg whites being whipped into a meringue or from a leavener interacting with the lemon juice. It is not very yellow (at least on the picture) so if it didn't taste very eggy, I would guess the proportion of eggs is significant but not very high.

If it didn't taste very cheesey (like a thick New York cheesecake feel in your mouth), it may have been made with light cream rather than cream cheese. If it was a little grainy, it could have been made with ricotta.

So here is my guess from just looking at the picture and reading your observations:

Egg-separated and egg white whipped to soft peaks and folded in.

Sugar-more than you would think for a custard.

Light cream

Corn starch or sweet glutenous rice flour as thickener

Lemon juice

Small amount baking soda

I believe the consistency is more difficult to emulate than the taste. Devise a custard recipe (in grams would be very helpful for recipe development) based on a review of recipes that have these ingredients. If you can use gram measurements and develop a small scale recipe, it should be easy enough to scale up. Experimentation takes time and effort but can be very fun!

Good luck! 

 

 

 

dablues's picture
dablues

Thanks for the observations.  Sorry I haven't gotten back to your reply sooner.  Going to print out your response and try some of the methods you stated.  I've tried so many different things, and it is so frustrating to like something and you know it's easy to make but you can't get it done properly.  Appreciate your input. Wish I knew where you could buy these.  I love Biscotti.  My cousin gave me her recipe, and that's what I use.  I like lemon and I like almond and the only thing I added was some almond extract along with the almonds.  Not sure this is what you would be looking for but I like the recipe and use it.  I haven't tried other biscotti recipes even though I do have a book that gives recipes for just biscotti.  I like plain and simple

dablues's picture
dablues

I've used the glutinous flour and I think there is sweet rice flour in it but not sure.  I tried some of the desserts like Mochi but it's too dense even though it tastes good.  I tried mixing glutinous flour with regular flour but no luck.  Maybe I used to much regular flour.  tried the sweet rice flour with regular rice flour but no luck there either.  Wish I had a chemist who could tell me what is in this dessert and I am sure it is very common ingredients.

Yippee's picture
Yippee

To investigate🕵🕵🕵

dablues's picture
dablues

Any suggestions where to find a lab to do this?  Probably would cost a lot.

Yippee's picture
Yippee

But there are so many scientists on our forum, I'm sure they will direct you to a lab if you really want to. 

Debra Wink's picture
Debra Wink

Cook's Illustrated published an article recently with a recipe for their copycat version of Biscoff cookies. I haven't tried it, so I can't speak for how accurate it is, but it looks/sounds promising. The title is Belgian Spice Cookies (Speculoos), and you can find it on pages 22-23 of the Sept/Oct 2018 issue.

dablues's picture
dablues

Haven't checked it out, but this isn't a cookie.  Thanks for your input.

Debra Wink's picture
Debra Wink

I was replying to clazar123 ...

Every cook has their nemesis. Mine is Biscoff cookies

But I wish you the best of luck in your quest too.

clazar123's picture
clazar123

I will check this out!

simplymonday's picture
simplymonday

https://en.christinesrecipes.com/2010/08/egg-custard-pastries-cheating-version.html

These "look" right, but they are almost too yellow in color. The ones we have at our local Chinese buffet (in Northern VA) have a slight hint of nut and vanilla/lemon, definitely look like  your pics.

https://food52.com/recipes/37274-tuscan-rice-and-custard-torta-torta-di-riso-alla-carrarina

This recipe has ingredients I feel like should definitely be IN these thin paper pastries.

I would think it needs to be more of a cake consistency rather than a custard. Might try this as my next recipe discovery. 

Egg Tart's picture
Egg Tart

I could see where it might be considered to be a bit cake-like. But nothing like the chinese cakes I've been looking at; dry, very finely grained and definitely cake-looking.  These aren't that. 

Isn't this crazy? 

I've just written to a pretty famous Chinese chef, asking the usual question.  So many of the egg tarts we see are connected to locales....Cantonese, etc.  Maybe she might have some information on that as well.  And I plan to contact some others as well.

In the mean time, bad egg tart news from my personal locale.  My local Chinese buffet, and source for my beloved egg tarts has recently started skimping on the egg tarts!!  They are pouring less mixture in each little cup, and now they're essentially thin, over-baked and coming out just sticky and tough.  So sad.....  I may have to complain.

8-)

oak26's picture
oak26

It’s funny that I was searching the internet for this dessert. I always eat a lot of this at a buffet close to us.  I call it asian cupcake :). It’s NOT rice cake. I thinks it’s custard (made with eggs, milk and flour) with baking powder and used egg roll wrapper then bake. I’ve been meaning to try this and see how it turns out. If u won’t try it, I will try to make it and I will let you know if it’s at least, close enough :) 

Jme776's picture
Jme776

I was searching around and the filling to this looks similar to the middle of the ones at the restaurant but just substitute the puff pastry for the thin wonton wrap 

Clyde Frog's picture
Clyde Frog

I believe this is it with some modification to it , I can tell that the one from my local China buffet glazes the top with mayo to give it a char look.  

 

https://en.christinesrecipes.com/2010/08/egg-custard-pastries-cheating-version.html?m=1

dablues's picture
dablues

thanks but this isn't a custard.  It's more cake like but very moist.  I saw that a while back.  Appreciate your input

Hlewis's picture
Hlewis

I have been searching for a recipe as well after having the exact same thing at a Chinese buffet I was told it’s a Japanese cheese tart but instead of making the tart crusts use double wantan wrappers I’ll add a link to the video it does have lemon juice powder sugar and vanilla in with cheeses it sounds right I’m making tomorrow hope it’s the one they’re amazing! I would like to think the buffet throws the cheapest ingredients in for max profit omitting the tart crust and going for wantan wrappers but hopefully it’s the same filling 

https://youtu.be/iCwgC1mlw0U

The end result filling consistency is different but i also think they sit longer or are premade then rebaked leaving a drier center. And I thought maybe an egg custard too but these were served warm at my buffet too next time I go I’m asking them many more questions! 

dablues's picture
dablues

Thanks so much for your input.  I watched the video and saw the recipe.  I doubt this is it but can't tell because the author didn't open up the cheese tart so couldn't see what the inside was like.  Three cheeses in this recipe and I don't think what I ate had any cheese in it whatsoever.  The past month or so, they finally listed the name of it, and they call it some type of flan, which I doubt that is either, since all flan recipes I checked out is more of a custard type.  I doubt I'll ever find out the recipe, and am sure it is really simple.  Thanks for trying to help me out.  As you can tell I've been looking for this for years with no luck.  

 

Egg Tart's picture
Egg Tart

Yesterday, at our Chinese buffet, I thought I'd take a picture with an Egg Tart and Egg Custard on one plate.  But the two could not be further apart.  Classic egg custard is wet, smooth, has no bubbles, cold... It's the same as the custard pie my Mom used to make.  Tasty, for sure.  But nothing like the textures of the Egg Tart. 

They were especially good, btw.  They were making them very lean for a while - not nearly enough filling, making them chewy and almost tough.  But these were luscious and wonderful.  The earth can now continue to spin on its axis.... 8-)

Egg Tart's picture
Egg Tart
dablues's picture
dablues

Thanks for the pic.  Looks good but I don't think it's the same, since it's more custard, and I do like custard.  This just eludes me.  

Buggie66's picture
Buggie66

I have had these amazingly moist sweet treats at Fortune Palace Asian Buffet in Sedalia Mo. I saw someone else had had them there as well. They call them Egg Puffs. I am researching these addictive pastries also. I came across your search also. I am know looking into Mushi Pan recipes. They are a steamed egg cake that comes in many different variations. I will post again if I find the right recipe. The ones I have read so far are not as moist and sweet as what I’ve had at the Buffett.

dablues's picture
dablues

I've been trying so very long to find a recipe to fit what I have shown in my post but have had no luck whatsoever.  I tried everything possible under the sun, and nothing compares.  The inside is very, moist and it feels almost like wet cotton.  I can't figure it out and everyone has been helpful and given me what they thought it might be, but it isn't.  I bet it is simple but I can't figure it out, so if you can find a recipe please post and I will try it to see if it is the same.

 

dablues's picture
dablues

I've tried the steamed version of egg cakes but not the same.  Will check out again.  Thanks!

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

Is it possible the eggs are from geese and not chickens?  Goose eggs are richer, handle like they already have cream blended into them.

dablues's picture
dablues

Thanks for replying.  I have no idea.  Serving this pastry at a Chinese buffet I would think the recipe can't be that hard, but what do I know.  First they said it was cheesecake, then they said it was flan, which it isn't, now they don't even have a name on the item at all.

TheAdmiralSoftPaws's picture
TheAdmiralSoftPaws

I’ve been looking for this recipie as well! I just read through most of the comments on this post and saw that you dismissed the idea that there is coconut in it, hear me out- my Chinese buffet (in TN) calls them coconut cakes. I’ve always thought this was super weird because they taste nothing like coconut so I’m guessing it has to do with coconut milk or something? That’s the only useful info I have right now but I shall post back if I manage to find a recipie. 

dablues's picture
dablues

I really doubt it is that, but will check it out.  So tired of trying to find this recipe which I am sure is simple.  I've tried EVERYTHING and nothing comes close.  So will give this a try.  Went to the buffet today, as we do every Wednesday and had that elusive dessert, lol!  Will keep on trying anything that anyone can deem might be what I want.  Thanks for your input!

 

dablues's picture
dablues

I really doubt it is that, but will check it out.  So tired of trying to find this recipe which I am sure is simple.  I've tried EVERYTHING and nothing comes close.  So will give this a try.  Went to the buffet today, as we do every Wednesday and had that elusive dessert, lol!  Will keep on trying anything that anyone can deem might be what I want.  Thanks for your input!

 

dablues's picture
dablues

I really doubt it is that, but will check it out.  So tired of trying to find this recipe which I am sure is simple.  I've tried EVERYTHING and nothing comes close.  So will give this a try.  Went to the buffet today, as we do every Wednesday and had that elusive dessert, lol!  Will keep on trying anything that anyone can deem might be what I want.  Thanks for your input!

 

dablues's picture
dablues

I really doubt it is that, but will check it out.  So tired of trying to find this recipe which I am sure is simple.  I've tried EVERYTHING and nothing comes close.  So will give this a try.  Went to the buffet today, as we do every Wednesday and had that elusive dessert, lol!  Will keep on trying anything that anyone can deem might be what I want.  Thanks for your input!

 

dablues's picture
dablues

I really doubt it is that, but will check it out.  So tired of trying to find this recipe which I am sure is simple.  I've tried EVERYTHING and nothing comes close.  So will give this a try.  Went to the buffet today, as we do every Wednesday and had that elusive dessert, lol!  Will keep on trying anything that anyone can deem might be what I want.  Thanks for your input!

 

dablues's picture
dablues

I really doubt it is that, but will check it out.  So tired of trying to find this recipe which I am sure is simple.  I've tried EVERYTHING and nothing comes close.  So will give this a try.  Went to the buffet today, as we do every Wednesday and had that elusive dessert, lol!  Will keep on trying anything that anyone can deem might be what I want.  Thanks for your input!

 

dablues's picture
dablues

I really doubt it is that, but will check it out.  So tired of trying to find this recipe which I am sure is simple.  I've tried EVERYTHING and nothing comes close.  So will give this a try.  Went to the buffet today, as we do every Wednesday and had that elusive dessert, lol!  Will keep on trying anything that anyone can deem might be what I want.  Thanks for your input!

 

dablues's picture
dablues

Have no idea why so many replies happened when I only clicked once.

David R's picture
David R

It's the universe's signal to you, to repeat this search as many times as it takes. 🙂

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

vary lemon for your own tastes    Brush on topping instead and continue baking until golden brown?

may have to fiddle with the finished look... perhaps hand held torch for caramel?

https://shop.countdown.co.nz/shop/recipe/898?name=lemon-cheesecake-tarts

mayonaise is beaten eggs...try beating the eggs 1) first the whites then drop in the yolks or 2) together about ten minutes to bring up the volume. 

Maybe you can share some of your trial details.  

dablues's picture
dablues

The ingredients doesn't show Mayo or flour.  Thanks for posting.  But, I don't think this is the right one.

joe_n's picture
joe_n

1 lb sweet rice flour (green package glutinous rice flour - use Chinese brand not Japanese mochiko; grind is different)

4 large eggs 

3 c milk

2.5 c sugar granulated

1 tsp coconut extract

1/2 stick melted butter (1/4 c) cooled

3 tbsp finely shredded coconut

mix all ingred together ; beat 2 min med speed

Spray a rectangular pan with PAM , end with around 1.5 inch depth;

pour mixture in and bake until golden and sides pull away from edge- Around 1 hr.

cool before cutting.

you can use muffin tins too

 

even if this is not the recipe for the cake above, you will thoroughly enjoy this baked good

 

dablues's picture
dablues

I've tried everyone's suggestions and am no closer to finding the ingredients and making this dessert which I am sure is a simple recipe.  Every suggestion I tried but it's not what I'm looking for.  Maybe it isn't even a Chinese dessert even though it is in the China Stars Buffet menu.  I've also tried Filipino desserts and some Portuguese.  Cannot figure this out and cannot get the airiness, moist wet interior that is in this dessert.  So I think I'll let it go once again, until the mood strikes me to look again.  I think I've covered all I can but this dessert eludes me.  I bet the ingredients are simple, and directions is easy, but if you don't know the combination you won't be able to make it properly, at least I can't.  I reached out to some but so far nada!  Thanks for all who have tried to help me find a recipe to make this.

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

have you tried a white mayonnaise cake?   

https://www.cooks.com/rec/doc/prt/0,166,144171-244198,00.html?

dablues's picture
dablues

No, I haven't tried that.  Thanks for posting. 

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

include a yolk or two in with the mayo.  You can always whip the egg whites folding in roughly to add more fluff.

dablues's picture
dablues

Looking at images for Mayonnaise cakes this is not the same.  I'll have to pass on it.  It's really not a cake at all and hard to describe.  All I can say it isn't a custard, it isn't Mochi, it isn't the texture of a regular cake at all or a sponge cake, and it isn't the texture of a cheesecake.  So I'm at a loss and going to give it a rest again since I'm sick of trying recipes.  I am sure it is a simple recipe but nothing is working for me as far as the texture.  The closest my husband thought was the Japanese Cheesecake, but I think he was wrong on that.  But maybe it's just me.  We will be going to the China Star Buffet today as we do every Wednesday and will have my little pastry as I do every week until they decide not to sell them any longer.  I think the food is brought in as I doubt they cook everything.  I do know they bake these as I seen them put them in an oven.  Don't know if they are frozen then baked, or already baked and heated up. 

David R's picture
David R

One thing I've certainly noticed, with some of my Chinese friends: When I ask "What's this food?", if they already know a correct English name for it then they'll tell me of course... but if they don't know one, they will sometimes make a sincere effort to be helpful by making something up. 🙂 It's always interesting, but not always clinically accurate. 🙂 I believe they sometimes try to think of the closest Western-style dish they can come up with, as a kind of analogy. (Perhaps they were thinking that I wanted to get a clearer idea of what sort of dish it is, to show me where it fits in planning a dinner, when I was actually hoping to hear an ingredient list.)

Note that only some Chinese people have done that. And note (if you hadn't already) that the way I use words can confuse just about anyone, let alone someone who's trying to keep up in their second or third language, in a noisy restaurant. 😁

clazar123's picture
clazar123

Ask them the name of the company that supplies them. Many of the Chinese buffets I've gone to use a restaurant supplier for their desserts and baked goods. If you can find the supplier you may have better luck at least finding the ingredients. Ask if you can order a box of unbaked tarts for a party. Ask for an ingredient list for allergy reasons. In some communities, the restaurant is required to have a list of ingredients just for that reason.

Take one to a few bakers and ask their opinions. They should be able to tell the base ingredients. The pictures are good but it is very hard to tell from pictures if it is an aerated custard, cheesecake or moist cake. Oriental sweets are generally very sweet. Just by looking at the picture, it almost looks like it could be a custard made with sweetened condensed milk.  Could it be sweetened condensed milk, lemon juice, a little starch(corn starch or flour) and baking powder? Kind of like a fluffy Magic Lemon pie filling. Does it have any egg taste? Also, it looks like it was torched to brown the topping of sugar. 

dablues's picture
dablues

I'll ask but doubt I will get anywhere.  Thanks!

ValMichael's picture
ValMichael

A Mexican friend works at a Chinese restaurant that serves this dessert.  I've only tried them once, but I thought that they were delicious too.  The restaurant isn't close to where I live and I haven't been able to find any local Chinese restaurants that serve them.  

My friend has just sent me pictures and amounts of the ingredients.  I'm not that much of a baker (anymore) and the recipe that he has sent me is for the restaurant, so you will have to figure out how to downsize the recipe.  

I will post what he provided in the next couple of days.

Yippee's picture
Yippee

🍮🍮🍮

David R's picture
David R

There are 1,280 tablespoons in a 5-gallon bucket.

We can do this. ☺️

dablues's picture
dablues

Would love to have the recipe.  I've tried just about everything and anything, with nothing being what I want.

ValMichael's picture
ValMichael

My friend sent me the recipe in pictures and in Spanish/English.  I've combined the two and put them in collage pictures, but I don't know how to attach them here.  Can someone help me with this?

Thanks.

dablues's picture
dablues

Can you email the recipe and I will type it up and post if possible?  If it is in another language I could translate it and hope it translates properly.

Egg Tart's picture
Egg Tart

Sorry, I just realized that long ago, when I sent this photo up, I forgot to say what is pictured....  On the left is a normal egg custard dessert, which our Chinese Buffet makes as well.  The same kind of sweet egg custard that my Mom used to make her custard pies.  The taste brings back lots of memories.

But the one on the right is the item that we are searching for.  Totally different in every way, other than egg and sugar are involved in there somewhere.  A bit more savory, with a texture nothing like the smooth density of regular egg custard.   The search goes on.

Egg Tart's picture
Egg Tart

Sorry.  I thought I was attaching the comment above to this picture that has been on the list for a while.  But it opened a new message instead.

I love the new postings from the woman whose friend works at her Chinese Buffet and has given her the recipe  (we hope).  Fingers crossed. 8-)

ValMichael's picture
ValMichael

I'm sorry but I don't know how many this recipe makes.  I am also not sure if it is Wonton Wrappers that are used or if it is something else.  I also don't know what temperature they are cooked at or for how long.  I'm sorry.

If someone can't figure those parts out, I can try to see if I can get my Mexican friend to ask the Chinese cooks for that information.

Please let me know if anyone has any success with what I've provided.

I'm keeping my fingers crossed!!!  🤞🤞🤞

Yippee's picture
Yippee

and your friend. Hope he/she won't get in trouble for 'leaking' the proprietary information.🤐🤐🤐.

Yippee

ValMichael's picture
ValMichael

I hope so too.  Though you would have to torture me to get the name and location!!!  😁😁😁

dablues's picture
dablues

I jumped the gun and replied twice before realizing you already posted the pictures.  I haven't read all of the recent posts on this yet.  Thank you for what you sent and will see what I can do.  I just mentioned to my hubby that I was giving this dessert a rest since I spent ALL weekend trying different concoctions and nothing came out the way it should.  Now today I get this response, so I will forge ahead on this and see if it is what I hope it to be.  Thank you!

David R's picture
David R

So...

Maybe divide everything by 10?

1 big can of condensed milk, half- to two-thirds of a cup of pineapple juice, 5 eggs, 1 tsp baking powder, 3 cups mayonnaise... ?

One third of a "thing" of flour?

One third of a "different thing" of sugar?

Or are the two "things" the same size?

My guess regarding the type of flour: I think it would be very odd in the US (no matter what nationality an individual might be) to keep a big bin that's simply marked "flour", and have it contain anything other than white all-purpose flour.

Also: I might just be wrong, but it appears to me that if someone guesses wrong about the amount of flour in this recipe it won't completely fail, just have a poor texture. And sugar can obviously be adjusted "until it tastes right", so no harm in not knowing the precise amount, just more taste tests required. 😉

Yippee's picture
Yippee

is pint-sized, I guess, both of them. 

David R's picture
David R

But one looks three-fourths full or so, and the other is overflowing. But you're probably right about the actual containers.

So maybe half a cup of sugar and three quarters of a cup of flour? I'm probably off for those.

ValMichael's picture
ValMichael

Yes, they are the same size containers, but I don't know what size they are.  Sorry!  ☹️

ValMichael's picture
ValMichael

They are 16 ounce containers.

ValMichael's picture
ValMichael

I gave up baking when I was a teenager.  My brother would eat the cookies that I had made (unless I added coconut), so I would have to make more.  At one point I was able to tell you how many cookies I could make with a can of Crisco.  😁😁😁

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

recipe only using mayonnaise instead of butter.  With the addition of pineapple juice, it gets heavy and turns into a custard.  For example look at this pound cake recipe to compare.  Just ignore the lemon zest & nuts.  This might help in the recipe reduction and give some kind of mixing method.   What do you think?

https://www.sbs.com.au/food/recipes/lemon-almond-pound-cake

dablues's picture
dablues

It isn't a pound cake.  The inside is very airy, and very moist.

David R's picture
David R

Also the proportions are far off from the literal pound cake.

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

mayo (butter substitute) and reduce the flour a bit.  Little tweaks.  Watch the mayo fat content and add just enough pineapple juice to keep a nice thick batter.  Don't forget that mayo often contains some lemon juice along with oil and eggs.  If paying attention to the mayo salt content, one needs max. about 1% salt  to flour content, The mayo in the recipe allows for reverse figuring to the amount of flour, if mayo contains 2% salt it stands to reason that the flour weight will be may be twice the mayo weight?

If you make the mayo yourself, you can adjust the salt and flavourings.  Use a good tasting neutral oil like canola or rice bran oil.  Sugar is coming from the milk as well but if you total sugar weight it isn't far from the weight of the flour.  The milk is the reason for the baking powder.  There are certainly enough eggs in the recipe to raise the batter, that baking powder is single active adds fluff and if more is desired, separated the eggs and beat the egg whites stiff, the resulting lightly folded batter should be good and airy.  Don't over mix.  

Converting a volume recipe is a nightmare but volumewise sugar is about twice as heavy as flour, mayo is somewhere in between and 5 eggs is a great place to start.  I would also add a glaze and take the gas torch to the tops if needed. 

Ok enough kidding around... sat down and got serious with converting the pictures to grams... see below.

dablues's picture
dablues

Need to figure out how much of everything.  Since there are only two in the household I tend to make small amounts of desserts, so not sure how to break this down into grams for a small portion or at least a regular portion to test it out.

dablues's picture
dablues

I made your version with the ingredients broken down.  I didn't use my muffin pan but used something smaller to try out in my new portable oven.  This is as close as I think you can get.  Not quite as airy but I think it's because of the pan I used.  The portion you broke down is exactly what I need.  For the smaller pan it make six, but with a regular muffin pan it will make less, and that is good since we are a two household family now.  This I will keep and am not sure if I need to tweak it or not since it is good.  Next time will do the wonton wrappers and caramelize the top.  Thank you so much for helping with this elusive dessert recipe that took me 7 years to get.  You are the one who did it.  Yeah!  Now I'm happy!

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

Happy Dance!  

Great Big Thanks to the spy pictures and puzzle, very helpful.  Never would have guessed it in another 7 years!  

We still have some playing around to do with the details.  :)

Danni3ll3's picture
Danni3ll3

 Been following this tthread, can you post the recipe all in one post? I got lost and I am no longer sure which person “finally did it”. 

dablues's picture
dablues

Thanks for posting this.  Will play around with it and see if I can get it to work and see if that is what I want. 

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

at my local Asian shop.  Been mulling this around in my head ever since the initial posting. (Has it been 7 years?)

About the pastry basket, any help on method so far? Obviously two squares of dough or wrappers.   Prebaked (weighted) or raw?   Any particular form?  Muffin pan, muffin top pan, cups or small bowls?  Anyone?

Yippee's picture
Yippee

now they sell it in more than one thickness. 

dablues's picture
dablues

Yes 7 years I've been wanting a recipe.  I look for a while until I get sick of doing it, and put it aside, until it tempts me again.  It could be pastry sheets that you can get in a Asian store.  I have some of those and you could cut them down.  I would say these are baked in a muffin tin and two layers of whatever dough they use.  It's not Filo dough, and not pie dough, so either the pastry sheets or won ton wrappers possible rolled thinner.  Don't know!

dablues's picture
dablues

I was told it was wonton wrappers.  I do know they bake in an oven since I seen them take it out of the oven.  One thing I notice when dissecting the filling from the wrapper, it appears [which I could be wrong] that at the bottom of the wrapper it looks like sesame seeds in it.  Not sure, and probably not needed.  Not sure how they bake wonton wrappers.  Do you brush them with butter first?  Anyone know?  Actually you don't really need the crust but I like it.

Egg Tart's picture
Egg Tart

Thanks to ValMichael for trying so hard to bring this quest to an answer. 

At least we know that there's nothing in there that is terribly unusual.  That's what we thought, but this helps. Seeing the pineapple juice also seems like exactly what we thought.  The mayo thing, though, still not sure.  I can usually tell if mayo is involved, and I don't taste it here.  But my mind is still open.  Val, did you see him add the 2 gal. of mayo??  Wow, that's a lot!

 

ValMichael's picture
ValMichael

No I didn't see him making the desserts.  He doesn't actually make them.  He was just doing me a favor by asking the Chinese cooks that he works with.  We do most of our communicating through messaging.  He sent me pictures and information in Spanish.  

I'm learning Spanish with Duolingo, but I've spent the last couple of years trying to interrupt exactly what he is trying to tell me, which isn't always easy. 😁

Clyde Frog's picture
Clyde Frog

Wow, this recipe is so close to Chinese mayo shrimp recipe, but assemble differently.  

dablues's picture
dablues

They used to have pineapple shrimp at the one I went too but took it off the lunch menu.  Don't know if they have it on the dinner menu but I used to love the pineapple shrimp.  That's when they put the dessert out the same time they stopped serving the shrimp at lunch.

David R's picture
David R

Wow that IS a weird coincidence.

Maybe the dessert should have a little shrimp garnish. 😁

Clyde Frog's picture
Clyde Frog

I couldn’t taste any hint of pineapple,  maybe my local China buffet uses honey instead of pineapple juice like how they make mayo shrimp 

 

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

One cup of mayo is made from 1/2 cup oil and one egg yolk plus spices sugar, salt, mustard,hot water and vinegar.    Mayo weights are fun, my 50% mayo weighs 490g but is 500ml.  So there is a 2% loss in weight when converting ml to grams.  So if one of the mayo gallons is converted to liters and then divided by 5, a further decrease by 2% should give the mayo weight for the reduced recipe.  Ha!   But that still seems like a lot of mayo... I get 757ml or 742g Mayonnaise 

My mayo is 1.9% salt.  That figures to 14g in the mayo plus 1g in the condensed milk...   Tip: Over salting can be tastewise reduced with dairy products like milk, cream, sour cream, etc. we have condensed milk in the recipe but 15g (three teaspoons or one tablespoon) seems like a lot.   Maybe I make my own mayo and drop some of the salt if 742g mayo is used. First to line up the recipe and reduce further for a taste test to see. Let's go on...

According to the 3Tbs baking powder amount (1/2 to 1 tsp per cup flour) the flour can be anywhere from 9 to 18 cups of flour.  The pictures look like twice as much volume flour when compared to sugar.  

If that is a pint container, 3/4 pint sugar (1.5 c) to 1 1/2 pints flour ( 3c)   Volume to grams....

Sugar is 200g per cup  so 200g x 1.5 = 300g     300g x 3 containers = 900g.   Divide by 10 brings sugar down to 90g.    (Total recipe sugar is 308g.)

I run with one cup of flour is 125g sometimes 130g but that looks like some heavy scooping, so maybe 135g per cup is closer (or maybe more)

135g x 3 = 405g    405g x 3containers =  1215g    Divide by 10 brings flour down to approx. 120g 

A little back check... 1215g / 125g per cup =  9.7 cups.  So the baking powder seems to check out with the lowest flour amount.

I picked up a can of sweetened condensed milk, it's a little over a cup   Weight is 397g  or 305 ml.  So that sounds reasonable and no leftovers! There is 0.25% salt (1g) and 55% is sugar (218g) included!  Heavy little can. Doesn't the picture show 396g after the 14 oz.?

Eggs... dividing by 10 gives 5 eggs.  Convert 5 eggs to grams... gotta do some digging. I'm getting old but there is a discussion here about the weights and sizes and such.  Let's go with 60 g each x 5 = 300g egg

Whats next?  Pineapple juice.... 4.6 fl oz   Well without converting I'd guess that is just over half an 8 fl.oz. cup. If one cup is 240ml (g) then 120 plus a little ...136g

Baking powder; single active (thanks Debra Wink) can be anywhere from half to one teaspoon per cup of flour. The 3/4 tsp looks pretty accurate.   If you have full acting baking powder might want to drop down to a half teaspoon. Sift into the flour several times and give a good stirring.

Open to discussions, corrections, this and that...

If I divide everything by 5 

The recipe looks like this and easily makes one dozen ... about right for a 12er muffin pan

148g   mayo

  18g   sugar

  24g   Flour.  

  79g   Sweetened condensed milk

  60g.  Egg. one

  27g.   Pineapple juice

  less than 1/4 tsp baking powder.  A pinch?   

David R's picture
David R

Another smaller and quieter beware: I think this recipe is weird, and I think it would be good to give its weirdness the benefit of the doubt and just make it, without trying to pre-correct any perceived flaws.

dablues's picture
dablues

I've been trying to come up with a recipe that matches this for 7 years and nada.  Nothing I do works.  I admit I don't look on a daily basis.  I go in streaks until I'm sick of testing then forget about it for a while until I get the urge to start up again.  I know it may be weird, and it may be easy, but if you don't know exactly amounts, etc. it isn't going to work.  Anyway not for me since 7 years is a long time trying to find something you know has to be simple but you can't get it done!  Thanks for your input.

dablues's picture
dablues

Thank you.  Will try this formula.  Haven't gotten through all my mail yet, so don't know if there is any more updates.  I need to make my condensed milk first.  Hope this is what I'm looking for or close to it, and then maybe have to tweak it.  If this is close, I sure do appreciate you finding this out.  Me, I didn't come close with two attempts yesterday.  Epic Failure!

David R's picture
David R

Beware! Most condensed milk comes in small cans. You want 14 oz (415 ml), which is considerably bigger than a standard soup can.

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

it really is a small can. Not tiny but definitely smaller than a soup can. Trick word..." condensed."  It is heavier than soup.  Fell into a black hole sometime before canning.  I've decided to try the one egg recipe with tapioca starch just to see how the batter tastes.

You're not the only one who thinks this recipe is weird.

David R's picture
David R

I think (from the slim circumstantial evidence available) that this is a repurposed use of a completely different recipe (i.e. "mayonnaise shrimp"!) with absolutely minimal modifications made in order to make it be a dessert.

"You can't make a decent cake this way!" - "Shut up, the customers love it." ☺️

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

sauce was mixed up for the shrimp but whoops, "no shrimp" and so the sauce got quickly commandeered for something else so it wouldn't get wasted.  

Stick mixer?

dablues's picture
dablues

Whether it is derived from mayonnaise shrimp or something else, I love it and would like the recipe anyway, lol!  Thanks for your input!  Went there today and they were late putting them out.  Thought after 7 years they weren't going to.  Got to get this recipe so I can make a small batch for me and hubby!  I just can't get the proportions right if it does include the mayo, eggs, milk, juice, etc.  I tried and had two fails!

dablues's picture
dablues

If you can come up with the proper portions of ingredients I would be so grateful!  For seven years I tried everything and anything and even with the ingredients that was posted I cannot get it right.  Tired of wasting ingredients and I can't eat everything that I make as a test or I would wind up weighing too much!  I really want to get a decent size recipe that works and then I can cut it down to size for just two of us.  Hope you can figure something out since I can't.  Thanks for trying to help!

dablues's picture
dablues

I do know that it comes in 14 oz.  I don't buy condensed, I make my own since I don't like overly sugary things.  It's the proper amount to use in a recipe that I need.  I need all the proper amounts, which evidently eludes me since I never got anything right about this simple elusive dessert. 

David R's picture
David R

But you already like this recipe the way they make it, right?

In my opinion you should buy a can of condensed milk. Condensed milk is not so simple to just make, properly.

If - later, after trying the original - you still want to use less sugar, then take some out of the cup of sugar, not out of the condensed milk.

Added later: This may sound too obvious when stated this way, but recipes often rely on the ingredients they list. Don't assume that substitutions will automatically work just because you'd like them to work. Especially when it's a recipe you've been trying for 7 years to get right, you follow the instructions precisely first - only later do you consider changing things.

 

It's apparently extremely tempting for some reason: "Now that I know for sure how to make the recipe I've been searching for for 7 long years, I'll celebrate by never making it; instead, I'll make something else that might sort of remind me of what I wanted, but that can't possibly be right." 😁

dablues's picture
dablues

For all the time that I have been trying to find the proper recipe I do follow the recipes as written except for sugar content.  I've always lowered the sugar content in any desserts I make and have not problems.  All the recipes I have tried that were written were not what I was looking for.  The Epic fail of the latest recipes is trying to figure out how much ingredient to use from the pictures that was given.  I'm going to try Mini Oven's instructions and see how that goes, and I like making my own condensed milk, been doing it for a while when I need it, but I don't need it often..  As long as the condensed milk I make tastes good then it's a go for me, lol! 

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

waiting for the oven to heat up to 160°C. Upper and lower heating elements, middle of the oven.

March 21

recipe so far...

148g   mayo

  18g   sugar

  24g   Flour.  

  79g   Sweetened condensed milk

  60g.  Egg. one

  27g.   Pineapple juice

  less than 1/4 tsp baking powder.  

Mixed and sifted tapioca starch with a knife point of baking powder and the sugar to prevent lumps later when adding, set aside.  Cracked an egg, scrambled it with a small whisk and set aside.  Simply combined mayo and milk and tasted it.  Not bad!  Added the egg and whisked together, then added the dry ingredients and whisked them in.  Still tasting and the tastebuds are still giving the "ok."  

Greased my muffin pan and 9.5 cm (3 3/4") wontons (for frying) into the pans shaping them with the help of a quirrel.   This one egg small batch easily makes a dozen.  

dablues's picture
dablues

Where did you find a tool like that?  Never saw one!

David R's picture
David R

You can get a quirrel for a quid at Elfridge.

Which is a lot better than getting squirrels for squids at Selfridges.

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

Smile. ....and slopped coffee

The stirrer seems to be vintage.  Seen many here in Austria out of wood, 8 star, 6 star, 4 star.  Mine is melamine and from my searching, most likely a classic.  Saw something similar from Dr Oetker.  It is a great tool for blending inside a cup or plastic yogurt type container, beating one egg.  Rinses and cleans easily.  

Funny it isn't more popular.  First time I saw one was here. The way it works for blending is to hold it like you are trying to make fire with a stick, using your hands palms together with the stick straight up between them. Then rub hands together twirling and alternating the stirrer clockwise and counterclockwise.  First timers should practice inside the sink. With a ring on, it makes a nice click-clack sound that is very relaxing. :)

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

they fell.  I left them in the oven until I thought the wrappers brown enough.  The tops of the mayo custard was not yet brown.  I think next time I need to brush off the loose starch on the wrappers before shaping them.  Maybe move them up a shelf in the oven or brush a glaze on them that will help browning and add a shine.

 Look!  It's a mini baker's bedroom!  With have to eat another one...  :)

Gosh I hope this comes close.  They were 23 minutes in the oven.  A few tweaks in the "look" department needed. Second and third also showing raised bottoms inside, I think moving up a shelf may help during baking. The custard is like soft bubbly set gel, not cake, I get that now.  The taste buds are thinking the balance of salt and sweet makes this work. I think if less sugar goes into the recipe then less salt as well (like less salt in homemade mayo.)

David R's picture
David R

To me it seems the filling looks right, and the wrappers look good but a bit different. I wouldn't know whether that different appearance is from the shaping or the baking or the type of dough.

Also I can be a very clumsy judge of appearances. ☺️

Reminder of where these are made, by busy cooks under pressure, and that they seem to have been constructed hastily from what was around - it has to be easy, and each component probably has to be available pre-made in bulk too, or at least easy to cut up or whatever. And probably baked on the hotter side of what's reasonable, to get them done quickly.

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

separated for more volume. Whites beaten to snow and folded in last.  This first round was more or less dumping the stuff together, first wet and then dry.  Perhaps the wrappers need a little moisture so the dough sticks to the bottom, or perhaps more pineapple juice into the mix?  Or steam?  Or lower the oven temp to 150°C.  The batter is easy to pour into the wrappers.  And then there is my choice of starch instead of AP flour.  Wonder what AP does?  

I cant stop eating them.  Don't know how the real ones taste but these aren't too shabby.  During the bake one smells mayo and then more pineapple aromas take over.  Very very mild in the custard.

There are wonton wrappers for boiling, for soup.  I chose the ones for frying and took the small size.  There are bigger ones.  I forgot to try the philo dough, was having too much fun with the thin wontons.   They can be made and filled quickly.  I made one for the micro and zapped it for 20 sec on high. The wrapper was a disaster but the goo wasn't bad.

David R's picture
David R

If the sketchy reports are accurate, the filling ingredients are dumped into a bucket. Nothing was mentioned about separating eggs. Maybe that was viewed as useless detail, but I doubt it, because separating eggs adds considerable work.

(Not that separating eggs is THAT difficult, but it's far more time-consuming than "put everything into a bucket".)

Clyde Frog's picture
Clyde Frog

I wonder if they freeze it up and then deep fried it once it’s frozen?  It just doesn’t seem like they baked it at my local China buffet.  I have tried baked crab rangoons vs fried and I could tell the difference because of how the wonton shells taste like.  I just think baking requires too much time for this desserts, especially at a buffet.  

David R's picture
David R

I never thought of deep frying but I bet you're right.

dablues's picture
dablues

In the restaurant they are kept warm so they don't appear to fall, but when I took one home it fell.  So I think that is normal. 

dablues's picture
dablues

You say you brushed off the loose starch.  Why did you use starch on them?  Did you brush them with any butter before placing in the tin?

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

but when looking at the second picture at the top of the post, I also see flour used in keeping wonton wrappers from sticking to each other.  The flour or starch is on both sides of each square.  I did not butter them or dab a little bit of water between them to make the stick to each other.  When eating, the wonton layers did tend to separate.  One wonton square would work.  But two look nice. Butter would make them brown faster.

dablues's picture
dablues

The top picture is deceiving.  When I get them at the Chinese buffet there isn't anything on the wonton wrappers.  No flour at all, but maybe they brush it off don't know.  Since I haven't made any with the wrappers yet will probably have to do something about sticking.  Not sure yet.  Going to try the starch instead of flour next time to see how it comes out.  But will divide the batter down since 12 is a lot for two people.  Those you can't keep long.  I could eat more than one, lol!

clazar123's picture
clazar123

I think the starch was the appropriate choice. I believe flour might be too...heavy. The crumb on the original post looks translucent. Flour would be more opaque, I believe. Try increasing the starch a bit?  Thickening may provide a little more resistance to forming the large baker's attic?

Needs either sugar sprinkled on top to brown or a torch to the surface.

Poss. brush the wontons with oil? The original picture is not fried-at least by its appearance.

I concur with the idea of moving up a bit. It may help the top brown and the bottom from heating too quickly.

 

David R's picture
David R

The large scoop of flour from a bin clearly marked "Flour" shows that it's flour.

Maybe starch would be better, but for now that doesn't matter, because "the real thing" is flour.

Duplicating something is tricky. Duplicating using intentionally different ingredients - more than tricky. 🙂

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

I've been in enough countries to know that "flour" is not always wheat flour.  In Costa Rica it was corn flour.  I had a Thai house guest here and she kept asking me for "flour."  I gave her my entire pantry but she wasn't happy.  When we were in the Asia market she showed me tapioca starch, "flour."  

I wouldn't be so sure "that flour" in the picture is wheat flour.  It looks too white and has starchy sheer edges.

They have cooled down now and I can taste the salt.  Didn't keep me from eating a few more.  Hubby killed the rest.  Two out of twelve had filled in bottoms, attics or bedrooms.  Making another batch tomorrow but want to get more tiny bubbles in the batter, less dense.  I may divide up the batter and try a few variations.  One more starch, one with more pineapple juice... sugar sprinkled on top sounds good for color.   :)   Syrup? Honey? Misting?

David R's picture
David R

I agree, but this is in an American restaurant.

Then again, what use would a big bin of wheat flour be in a Chinese-buffet kitchen? And looking at the picture, I can see what you mean - bright white, and maybe slides over itself the way dry starch does. So I am thoroughly unconvinced that the original is flour, and if it's starch then I won't be surprised anymore.

dablues's picture
dablues

The test with flour went fine.  At this point whatever works Is ok with me.  I reached out to a gentleman regarding this and sent him the picture.  His response was "he thinks it's a made up dessert" which is probably true, but I don't care what it is as long as I can make it.

David R's picture
David R

All desserts are made-up ones. ☺️

(Think about it. 🙂)

Well, except for the ones that are simply discovered, like plain fruit.

dablues's picture
dablues

I have some on hand.  Maybe next time, I'll try starch instead of flour.  Still want it more airy so am going to whip the egg whites, or maybe up the hydration a bit.

Clyde Frog's picture
Clyde Frog

http://allrecipes.com.au/recipe/27767/deep-fried-milk.aspx

I found this ingredient by searching for Chinese deep fried custard.  It also uses condense milk, but no mayo.  

This method involves bringing those ingredients to a simmer first and then freeze it up after. Quite interesting 

Clyde Frog's picture
Clyde Frog

So my educated guess

simmer those ingredients, let it cool down until it’s thicken, shape out the wonton wrappers in a muffin pan, pour in the sauce into the wonton wrappers, freeze the whole ingredients all together, and then deep fried it. 

dablues's picture
dablues

I've made cakes by separating the eggs and whipping the egg whites.  Next batch I will try that and see how it is, but this came out fairly well.  Can't complain!

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

While I still have fresh ingredients, will stir up another batch.  

I can't see freezing these, I'm afraid the dough edges would break besides, thawed out dough can't be refrozen.

Clyde Frog's picture
Clyde Frog

This method is use for crab rangoons, eggrolls, and also fried dumplings.  Freezing it will allow the fillings and the shell to cook evenly.  Without freezing it,  the fillings will get too hot and burst from the shells.  

ValMichael's picture
ValMichael

I'm having fun reading the posts on this dessert.  I really hope that my friend and I were able to help with the recipe that he provided. 

I do better at take out, so I'll just have to settle for driving a couple of hours to have this dessert.  😁

Please keep on posting the progress that yinz are making in perfecting this dessert!!!  🤞🤞🤞

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

if one egg makes a dozen of these...how does one picture 50 eggs worth?  

50 dozen, wow, where to put the trays ... with 1200 wonton wrappers!  

David R's picture
David R

Commercial link; I'm not affiliated with them in any way.

Rack for Sheet Pans

dablues's picture
dablues

Yes you and your friend helped.  I knew those had to be the proper ingredients since they were the same ingredients I was told 7 long years ago, but you had more info than I did.  The winner besides you and your friend is Mini Oven!  She broke down the recipe.  I am not that great with math, and I should be.  I didn't use a torch just a suggestion it could be.  If you see in person where I get them, they are very dark.  Don't know if they torch or not, or broil the top or not.  Anyway, I just like the dessert.

ValMichael's picture
ValMichael

I've only had them once and after I left, I wanted to go back and get more.  😁

Egg Tart's picture
Egg Tart

Dablues, did you use the recipe we have in grams??  What temp did you bake it at?  For how long??  Itching to try it.  Not using wontons yet - will use cupcake papers first.  Maybe in coffee cups.  My big oven is on the blink, so will use a toaster oven, any my cupcake tins won't fit.   8-o  This could be interesting.   BTW, our Chinese only uses one wonton.  (reminds me of the old song, "One Meatball")  (oh, there I go again)

I really feel that the browning on top is a natural thing, not a torch thing.  The color is not that dark.  A spot of broiler might not hurt tho...

Ooh, this is so exciting!   

dablues's picture
dablues

I always weigh my ingredients if in volume using the escali baker's percentage scale then convert to grams.  They have a lot of settings for flours, etc.  Mostly I use  My Weigh Scale for weighing.  Since this was a test I chose to bake at 350F and baked for 15 minutes and they were cooked through.  I didn't use wontons since this was just a test.  Next time will separate the egg, and whip up the egg white and fold in.  Then I can compare which method I like best.

Clyde Frog's picture
Clyde Frog

I’m pretty sure they didn’t freeze the whole entire ingredient from a bucket,  from the previous recipe that  I found which is called “fried milk”. They simmer the mixture.   In this case,  they probably simmer the whole mixture and then pour it into a wonton mold inside a muffin tray  and freeze it up for deep fry or baking.  

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

would not work.  It gets thick fast, that's what heating in the micro showed.  (I've been comparing this to microwave mug cakes.). The most interesting thing is a bucket of this stuff and 1200 wonton wrappers. One wouldn't be fiddling with it much. And would it be chilled or frozen on a big rack before baking?   Or just the bucket of sauce chilled with trays made when needed.  (The shrimp recipe says the sauce can be made ahead of time and chilled for several days). I can't imagine giving up much floor space in the deep freeze or the fridge and who has that many muffin trays?  So what about giving the dough a chill and rest after mixing?

 I can see using a heavy duty stick mixer since a bucket might be indicated in mixing. Eggs can also be whipped into the mayo sugar mixture a little at a time followed by milk drizzled in. Flour w/ BP added near the end or between cans of milk.   My thoughts center around keeping the bubbles inside the baking dough for lift and little shrinkage when cooling.  

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

ah!  This may be a clue to tweak -- reduce the amount of flour or starch in the recipe.

dablues's picture
dablues

I assume you weigh your ingredients.  I do weigh mine.  I didn't find that mine was too thick but maybe I'm wrong.  Will try next time to cut down a tad.  At least we now have the recipe.

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

 good for pouring but the thickening comment had to do with simmering the batter in previous brainstorming. Simmering would make the batter too thick to shape or pour.

dablues's picture
dablues

Ok, thanks for the input!

Clyde Frog's picture
Clyde Frog

This isn’t a 5 stars restaurant that serve this desert to us, it is a buffet.  They have to be fast and efficient

David R's picture
David R

...and they potentially employ staff who don't communicate easily with each other, due to (sometimes multiple) language differences, and may have high staff turnover.

Clyde Frog's picture
Clyde Frog

Freezing and frying isn’t as bad as most people think,  I know Chinese chefs who use this method to keep their fried eggrolls, dumpling, and crabrangoon remain crispy after hours of being cooked.  

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

Ok, will try to freeze some of the batter.  It could very well freeze into an Icecream type mass to be scooped out with a small icecream spoon and placed into the middle of the wrapper, shaped, placed in tin, then baked.  That would give the tops a chance to brown before the centers are baked and possibly keep the lower part of the wonton wrappers light in color.  Just an idea.  Someone else can play with frying them.  Sesame seeds?

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

Even at 160°C  (325° F) the bake was too warm.  "Lower the temp" was suggested to me by a professional baker."  

I didn't get the chance for a second bake to test a lower temp but it makes sense.

ValMichael's picture
ValMichael

I posted a picture of this Chinese dessert on FB asking friends if they knew of any local Chinese Buffets around that had this dessert.  Someone commented saying that a Chinese Buffet 6 miles from my house had it on their buffet.  I went last week and checked it out and it definitely looked the same as the picture and what I remembered from the time many months ago that I first had it.

I don't know if it was because I already knew what the ingredients were or not, but the mayonnaise taste was overwhelming to me.  I don't remember tasting the mayonnaise before.  But it was so long ago that I don't totally remember.  I guess the next time that I'm at my friend's Chinese Buffet I will have to try it again.  Hopefully it won't be too long before I go or I will forget what this one tasted like.  😁

dablues's picture
dablues

Do you weigh your ingredients to be accurate?  

ValMichael's picture
ValMichael

dablues,

I didn't make them.  I had them at a local Chinese Buffet.  I've eaten there before (which I'll probably never do again, maybe other than to get a couple of their Egg Custard desserts, because a lot of the food wasn't even that hot), but I never tried the Egg Custard desserts, that's what the label said they were.

I asked the owner of my favorite Chinese Buffet if he had ever heard of this dessert.  He said that he hadn't, but that if I brought him the recipe he would see if they could make them.  I didn't have the ingredients with me when I stopped in for lunch earlier this week, but I told him what the ingredients were.  He said that they had everything on the list.  I'm going to drop off the printout of the pictures that I posted here. He did ask me what temperature to bake them at and for how long. I told him that someone had posted the oven temperature, but that it was in celsius but that I only know fahrenheit. 😁

dablues's picture
dablues

Let me know how you make out.  Google Celsius to Fahrenheit and you will be able to convert.

 

David R's picture
David R

You have Celsius

× 9

÷ 5

+ 32

Now you have Fahrenheit.

 

Or Google does that for you, yeah. 🙂

 

Linda Kaufman's picture
Linda Kaufman

Oh, wow. I, too, was looking for a long recipe for these delicious sweets. But unfortunately, I could not do it. When I was in China, I asked the sellers, but they just waved me off and didn't talk. What's up?)

Catawba2214's picture
Catawba2214

I've been trying to figure these out for the last 5 or 6 years myself! Every once in a while I do a new search and last night around 1 am stumbled on this thread needless to say I couldn't go to sleep until I read it all lol.

  I first had these at a buffet just east of Tampa Fla.  We only got to go there 2 or 3 times before they closed and I haven't found them anywhere else since so I was never able to really figure them out. 

At first I thought it was a pineapple cake in phillo, the pineapple was the first thing I could identify but the rest was a mystery.

  I wouldn't have guessed mayo was an ingredient but it didnt surprise me either it would explain how moist they are and the color and almost stickiness of the top without being overly sweet.   

Thank you all for being so dedicated to figuring this little gem out I can not wait to make some!!!

 

dablues's picture
dablues

Amounts to use.  I looked for years, I was given the same ingredients years ago but no amounts and played with it but never came close.  Val gave the ingredients, Mini broke it down and now you just need to tweak the recipe and the ingredients are the right ones on this post.  Just read the posts for the ingredients.  Very simple but if you don't know exactly what was in it, you won't make it come out right. 

Dacron's picture
Dacron

It's a modified buttermilk pie built miniature. Google buttermilk pie, tell me what you think. 

dablues's picture
dablues

The ingredients and the amount to use has already been posted.  You need to read the whole thread to find what you are looking for.  Look at Mini Ovens Posts.  She figured out the amount of the ingredients. 

Dacron's picture
Dacron

I read the post prior to commenting. I just wanted to chime in that it in essence was a buttermilk pie(which at heart is a custard base also).  I only said to Google it because just off the initial image you shared from your very original post, the similarities stuck out.

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

pretty tasty too and I can see pouring it into some wonton cups.  Wonder how it tastes on shrimp? :) 

ValMichael's picture
ValMichael

If everything works out, I'll be traveling next Tuesday to meet up with my friend who supplied me with the recipe that I posted awhile ago.  He's moving, so I have no idea when or if I will ever get the chance to see him again.  I'm hoping to (planning on) stopping at the restaurant where I first tasted this wonderful dessert.

If anyone has figured out the recipe for one batch, I would love it if someone could post it.

I've gotten my Aunt Grace's Broccoli Salad perfected . . . I think I'm ready to move on to the next challenge!!!  

Have an awesome day everyone!!!  😁

BTW . . . I live about 25 miles from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.  I'm not sure where everyone else is from, but I'm curious!!!

dablues's picture
dablues

in Georgia.  Born and raised in Upstate New York but moved to Georgia in 1998,