The Fresh Loaf

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Borodinsky using the Auerman Process

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ananda's picture
ananda

Borodinsky using the Auerman Process

Borodinsky using the Auerman Process

Late last week a package arrived for me in the post from Faith, who posts here at TFL.   She had been on a visit to Russia and brought back a tub of Red Rye Malt for both Daisy_A and one for me.

My wife, Alison went out of her way yesterday to buy some Blackstrap Molasses for me to enable me to bake a Borodinsky loaf today.

Here is the detail and formula.

Rye Sour build:

Day/Time

Stock

D Rye

Water

TOTAL

Monday 08:00

64

300

500

864

 

Material/Stage

Formula [% of flour]

Recipe [grams]

1a] Rye Sourdough

 

 

Bacheldre Organic Dark Rye Flour

30

300

Water

50

500

TOTAL

80

800

 

 

 

1b] “Scald”

 

 

Bacheldre Organic Dark Rye Flour

15

150

Red Rye Malt

5

50

Blackstrap Molasses

6

60

Crushed Coriander Seeds

1

10

Boiling Water

35

350

TOTAL

62

620

 

 

 

2. “Sponge”

 

 

Rye Sourdough [from 1a]

80

800

“Scald” [from 1b]

62

620

TOTAL

142

1420

 

 

 

3. Final Paste

 

 

“Sponge” [from 2]

142

1420

Bacheldre Organic Dark Rye Flour

25

250

Marriage’s Organic Strong White flour

25

250

Salt

1.2

12

TOTAL

193.2

1932

 

 

 

% pre-fermented flour

30 + 20 = 50

-

% overall hydration

85

-

% wholegrain flour

75

-

FACTOR

10

-

 

Method:

  • Build the sourdough as described above.   Make the “scald” as follows:   crush the coriander and add it to the red rye malt and dark rye flour.   Weigh the molasses into a pan, add water and bring to a rolling boil.   Tip this onto the flour mix, and add any extra boiling water if there is evaporation.   Stir well to ensure full gelatinisation.   Cover and cool.
  • Once sufficiently cool, add the scald to the sour to make the sponge.   Cover and leave to ferment for 6 hours.
  • For the final paste combine the sponge with remaining flour and the salt, mix with the paddle beater in an upright machine, 2 minutes on first speed and 2 minutes on second speed.   Scrape down the bowl to ensure thorough mixing.
  • Bulk proof for 1 hour with DDT at 25 - 27°C.
  • Shape into a large Pullman Pan, prepared with lining of butter and coating of rye flour.   Smooth off and top with freshly crushed Coriander seeds.
  • Final proof for just 1 hour at 27°C, then bake.
  • Pre-heat the oven to 280°C.   Load the pan, apply steam, and turn the oven down to 100°C.   Keep a supply of steam in the oven and bake for a total of 4½ hours.
  • Cool on wires; wrap in linen and leave 24 hours before cutting into the bread.

CHOCOLATE, dark chocolate!

 

Alison’s massage therapist left half an hour ago, and bought half of this loaf.   I’m celebrating as it means I got to capture a crumb shot, and to taste a lovely thin slice too, all on its own.   Sourness and bitterness, but also just enough sweetness too from the malt.   It’s dark, dark like chocolate, and the spicy coriander is very pronounced …Taste!

All good wishes

Andy

Comments

Juergen Krauss's picture
Juergen Krauss

Happy bread made by a happy baker!

Juergen

ananda's picture
ananda

Thank you Juergen, yes, I am a Happy Baker.

Best wishes

Andy

varda's picture
varda

catch those shots with half the bread disappearing out the door.   And what a nice supply chain you have.  -Varda

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi Varda,

Yes, good supply chain indeed.   Someone just rang up 10 minutes ago and they want the rest of what's available of this lovely bread, and another loaf besides.

Very best wishes

Andy

PiPs's picture
PiPs

Beautiful Rye Andy,

How did you find the red rye malt? Was there much difference from the roast malt you were using?

Lovely looking crumb colour and I am impressed by the bake time. Must taste amazing.

Cheers,
Phil

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi Pil,

Yes there is a lot of difference between the Crystal Malt powder I have used, which is derived from barley, and this redmalt which is rye.   I was advised that there was a huge difference some time ago here on TFL by suave.

Slow cooking is certainly the way to go with this type of bread.   The small amount which remains will get darker and darker in the next couple of days!

Many thanks for your generous comments

Best wishes

Andy

ehanner's picture
ehanner

Fine looking Rye Andy. Nice you could source the malt.

Eric

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi Eric,

Good to hear from you as always.

Yes, the rye malt is intense, and adds to the loaf; so does that long slow bake, of course.

Very best wishes

Andy

Janetcook's picture
Janetcook

Hi Andy,

I have baked this recipe 2x now and people I give it to love it.

The first time I used barley malt.  Last loaf I used rye malt that I malted myself.  Neighbor hasn't commented yet on the difference on the taste so it was nice to read your comment on taste above.

The last loaf I made I did under cook....Measured the right temp. but the center of the loaf was not cooked so I have made note of your longer baking time and will give this another go.  Really is a nice formula to work with....easy to do and a real winner with rye lovers!

Thanks for the update on baking times and flavor results with the rye malt!

Take Care,

Janet

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi Janet,

That's really great to know you've made this and it's popular.   The rye malt has so much more character than the barley.

If you've made loaves the size of this [almost 2kg], then they take some baking.   Intense heat is good to load the loaves, but then it needs dropping rapidly.   I reckoned that 100*C with a good pan of water in the oven would give a little steaming effect, and it seemed to work.

Always remember that the first check whether a loaf is baked or not is not the probe reading of the core; it is always to ascertain how long the loaf has been in the oven!

Many thanks for your kind words

Best wishes

Andy

Janetcook's picture
Janetcook

Andy,

The first ones I made were each about 500g and baked in an 8x4 cast iron pan.  They didn't need to bake very long at all.

This last time I used my pullman pan - 9x4x4 - and I used 1kg of dough!  Huge change.  I did bake it longer than the ones I baked in the cast iron pans but didn't know not to trust the thermometer with a  loaf this size.  

So, how do I know if it is baked all the way through without using the thermometer?  How do I know how long in the oven is long enough?  Are there any external changes that would inform me or do I simply go by trial and error?

Do I keep the steam going the entire time?  (I have noticed on some of my rye breads I end up with very thick, hard crusts.)

Thanks,

Janet

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi Janet,

Core temp is still an essdential check...think food safety as well here.   But first check is the clock.

Really, just know and understand your product.   Rolls will bake fast as large surface area to volume; so bake hot with high top heat, but knock back on the bottom heat as the fat content will encourage excess browning otherwise.

Panned loaves the opposite: big voume to surface area

Ciabatta high water means care required product is baked out

Here you have very high water too...and sugars in one form or another.   So extended baking time, lower temps.

Keep the lid on and it won't burn, or allow crust to dry out if you bake really slowly at around 100*C and it will simply cook in its own steam.   Hence all the lovely caramelisation and dark, dark but soft crust.

Try to relate your ferment to the bake too.   Have you ever seen brad baked where the yeast has been omitted?   There is some lift from the steam, but the doughy core will never bake because it is just too dense.   So if your proof levels are restricted and you are facing up to "brick time", then bake time will be affected.

Lots to think about, and it's best just to bake a lot and really apply your increasing knowledge of oven conditions as time goes on

Very best wishes

Andy

Janetcook's picture
Janetcook

Andy,

Thanks for the pointers.  One of the things I really appreciate about this site is the fact that with each new loaf/product I attempt I learn something new. I get to ask questions that I can't do when simply baking from one of my cook books....The authors of those books simply do not have time to answer the questions that arise and I am one who likes to know the reasons things are done the way they are done....gives me a better picture and understanding of the process.

Your rye loaf fits into the category of being a new teacher for me teaching me the element of a long low temp. bake and why.  I also appreciate the explanation on the other loaves as well....Almost made a cibatta dough for today but decided to turn it into a foccacia instead....

Thanks for taking the time to explain the reasons behind the process. I will let you know how the next loaf turns out when I attempt it again.

Take Care,

Janet

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi Janet,

When I first baked the HB Black Pumpernickel and Eric and I opened up discussion about steaming this style of bread it was a pretty new concept to me.   I remember Nico and Mini mentioning that they baked from cold, and thinking, I've never done that!

But rye paste in a sealed pan is so very different to baking any other breads I can think of.   The method I am using here is allowing the bread to cook in its own steam.

Keep on learning!

All good wishes

Andy

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

 

this fine rye loaf would be a prime candidate for my Wagner Ware Magnatite covered roaster?  I would think that it could be really good for it to cook in its own steam nice and slow and no fuss with having to steam seperately.  I could sit nice and comfy in the clotche for as long as it took.  No muss no fuss.  Just a thought,

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi dabrownman,

There are several discussions amongst my blog posts about steaming possibilities for this bread.   The main obstacle in the home is that the Pullman Pan is well over 30cm long, so a big outer pan is needed to house this.   Yes, your roaster, as shown would be ideal, especially with such a good grid to stand the loaf pan on so it sits nicely above the waterline.

At the time ehanner and I had the original discussion I remember zebbakes who is UK-based like me, suggested using a fish kettle, which is also a really good idea.

Commercially I've used 2 methods to steam this bread.   Most recently I used the steam setting of a "Combi Oven" and held the bread at 100*C for 12 hours when I made the Horst Bandel Black Pumpernickel from Hamelman.

A few years back now, we used to make a lot of Christmas Puddings when I worked at the Village Bakery, Melmerby.   We put these inside deep coffins, the same surface area as a standard baking sheet [60 x 40cm], but deep enough that they just fitted through the oven doors.   We put water in the bottom of each coffin, then fitted a platform above that which had holes in it to allow the steam through.   We sat a wire basket on top of that which held all the filled pudding pots.   The coffin was tightly lidded.   They were made from light steel, I suspect, so weighty to manoeuvre around the big oven on a peel.   We pulled them from the oven by using a hook on a long handle [3metres] attached to the handle of the coffin.   Instead of Christmas Puddings, we have also used the same method to steam some very tasty Seeded Rye loaves in small tins.   Even then, they took 4 - 6 hours to cook through properly.

Best wishes

Andy

dabrownman's picture
dabrownman

I can scale the recipe down to fit the Magnalite Wagner Ware and not worry, as you do, about commercial scales.  It's now on my list of breads to try.  Your breads are to die for and your community in the UK is blessed as a result.

ananda's picture
ananda

Your words are very generous, but much appreciated.

Best wishes

Andy

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

:)

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi Mini,

You like?

I'm going to work on 100% rye for these loaves so Alison can start to eat bread again moving forward.   Wheat will have to stay off limits I suspect.

Very best wishes

Andy

nicodvb's picture
nicodvb

Hi Andy, yesterday I baked your bread and today I sliced it. This bread is delicious! and the crumb is perfect, too! In almost all other occasions long and slow bakings like this resulted in a rawish crumb that littered the knife. Evidently I was baking before the dough reached the right degree of acidity (my pHmeter is broken).  Not so this time: all fermentations took place at around  35° to maximize the development of acids and taste. 

I replaced that pestery coriander with sunflower seeds, as I don't like the overwhelming taste of spices in bread.

The only thing that left me with some doubt was the lid: did you use it during baking? If so, does your lid have holes? I baked 2.5 hours with lid on and 2 without.

Thanks for the recipe!

  Nico

ananda's picture
ananda

Hi Nico,

What a timely post, and I am so glad to read of your success baking slowly for this bread.

I'm only making the Moscow Rye at the moment, after Codruta's visit when we made Moscow Rye, Borodinsky and Black Pumpernickel all side-by-side.   I found the molasses content in the Borodinsky to be over-powering when compared with the Moscow Rye.   I believe from the GOST formula that the Borodinsky is meant to be much sweeter than the Moscow Rye, as the formula calls for quite some element of sugar.   I will need to look at this and think about it.   Originally, I swapped the sugar for molasses.   Now I'm thinking I need to cut back the molasses.   However, I NEVER use refined white sugar, so I have to look at other means to produce a sweeter loaf, without using this.   I think I may look at the amount of coriander too; although that is harder to judge since the strength of flavour from different batches of coriander seed seems to be so variable.   I always grind them fresh, as that seems to be the best way to extract maximum flavour and aroma.   Sorry you don't like coriander!

For baking, I usually leave the lid on the whole time.   Actually my tins have 3 small holes in the bottom, so there is room for steam to escape, and that seems to be enough to allow me to bake right through the time with lids on.   Bake time is really dependent on temperature.   As you know I am trying to bake these loaves on the dead wood-fired oven, as means to establish efficient production schedule.   However, this means it is impossible to rely on a regular bake temperature schedule, because my oven fires up differently every time, and it really depends how much other bread I have put through each bake cycle.

On the subject of temperatures, I have to agree.   This morning I have made up a 6.5kg "sponge" which is soon to be turned into 9kg of Moscow Rye paste.   I did this by making up the "scald" and then adding it straight to the sourdough, without even waiting for it to cool.   The resulting mix temperature of the sponge was 35*C.   The formula calls for a 4 hour fermenting period for the sponge before going on to make the final paste.   It is now 2.5 hours since I mixed the sponge, and it is absolutely kicking!!!   Meantime my wood-fired oven is just getting going ready for the bake.   I'm building it up slowly, as it hasn't been used since Codruta's visit.   However, it is the Farmers' Market on Friday, then Alnwick Food Festival on Saturday and Sunday; I have a speaking engagement there on the Saturday, as well as a stall for 2 days with a colleague to sell our lovely breads.   So, bigger bakes for the rest of the week.

All good wishes

Andy

nicodvb's picture
nicodvb

Andy, I'd really love to deal with that amount of rye doughs you are preparing!

I didn't use molasses because the shop wanted an outrageous price. Instead I used an invert sugar that I prepared myself, but that ended up turning into caramel (I cooked it too much and when it got cold it turned into a red mass that is known as sokkar for other -special- uses that I don't need).  Certainly it lacks the bitter tone of molasses, but  it has its own flavor, not only the dull sweetness that sugar provides.

I stopped baking the bread when it began to retire from the sides of the tin, just like a cake. It proved to be a reliable method in this case:)

I found your Moscow rye. It's nice having so much choice!

Thanks and best wishes,

  Nico

jkandell's picture
jkandell

"i found the molasses content in the Borodinsky to be over-powering when compared with the Moscow Rye."

i had the same reaction when I tried auerman recipe. I think molasses and coriander are not an ideal flavor combo. It is unorthodox, but I prefer a slight amount of honey in borodinsky. Not do much it becomes dominant, but enough to cut the molasses way down. Russians request my bodinsky, so can't be that inauthentic. :)

ananda's picture
ananda

Hello Nico,

Just thought I'd post these photos I took of the ripe sponge.

I'm making 7 loaves scaled @ 950g, 1 @ 480g and 1 @ 1700g.   Tomorrow I'm making 40% this total amount as I will run out of light rye flour then; more coming in tomorrow teatime.   So I'll be making 9kg paste again on Weds, Thurs and Friday! That's around 40kg in total to use for sales at the weekend.

I'd like to source a lighter grade of molasses, but that is hard to find in the UK.   I'm thinking Brown Rice Syrup just at the moment; what do you think about that?

Very best wishes

Andy

nicodvb's picture
nicodvb

Andy, I never used rice syrup, but a friend that bought it told me that it's totally flavorless. Maybe plain ND malt syrup is the best substitute if you don't have molasses?

Juergen Krauss's picture
Juergen Krauss

Hi Andy,

I brought a jar of this stuff

http://www.violey.com/en/heirler-organic-sugar-beets-syrup_p_17185.html?crn=gbp

from Germany, the bakers there use it for some classical dark ryes like Schrotbrot and Rheinisches Vollkornbrot.

It has some of the taste of molasses, but is not as dominant.

Best Wishes,

Juergen

ananda's picture
ananda

Thanks Both,

Juergen, I've used the beet syrup you speak of; it was a key component of the original Village Bakery Carrot Cake before it was ruined when it went "global".   I like that; it has a pretty strong flavour too.

Nico, what is ND malt syrup? Barley?   Actually, I'm not too bothered about high flavour given I will still keep some Black Strap Molasses in the formula, and there is, of course, the Red Rye Malt going in there too.   Flavour is not exactly a problem  with these breads..but you know that already, of course.

Here are some photos of the Moscow Rye paste after bulk fermentation prior to scaling and panning:

 

Thanks again my rye friends

Andy

nicodvb's picture
nicodvb

yes, Andy. In the hurry I didn't specify that I intended barley malt syrup.

I like a lot beets, maybe I'd like beet syrup, too. Funny that even though italy is the largest beet producer in Europe beet syrup is nowhere to be found!

You breads will come out tasty as usual:)

ananda's picture
ananda

Thanks for clarifying that Nico,

I've just loaded the breads into the oven.   The infra-red thermometer gave readings between 220 and 240 at various points around the oven.   But, filling it with all that metal from the bread tins, plus a pan of boiling water plus 9kg of rye paste distributed across the tins will surely have some impact on the heat stored inside my brick monster!

Thank you as ever for your kind words

Best wishes

Andy

jkandell's picture
jkandell

In the auermann formula molasses isn't added to the scald but to the final dough.