The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Recipe for a good hoagie roll

ryan_d's picture
ryan_d

Recipe for a good hoagie roll

Hey all, this is my first time posting on the forum. I just found the site a few days ago and have learned a lot already. I was wondering if anyone had any good recipes for making hoagie rolls. Being very new to the bread-baking scene, I'm not all that good with adapting a standard french or italian loaf into a sub-style loaf. Any guidance would be quite appreciated.

 

-Ryan

bwraith's picture
bwraith

ryan_d,

I think you'd get an OK rendition of a hoagie roll (MiniOven did something like this) by just using the "A Hamburger Bun" recipe (link) I posted in a blog recently. You would shape into about 4-5 hoagies instead of 10 hamburger buns. To shape, cut dough into 5 pieces and let rest for 5 minutes. Then stretch each piece into approximately a square. Fold/roll it over itself lengthwise like a letter, and seal the folds against the counter with your fingers or the heal of your palm. Stretch to lengthen a little more if necessary. Put the folds underneath and gently squeeze the sides and ends underneath a little more to increase the surface tension. Press down gently on top with palms to seal the seams and any dough you pushed underneath. Let rest five minutes, then place on pan for final proof. Omit sesame seeds, but still paint the surface with milk just before baking. Sorry if my description of the shaping is unclear.

Bill

qahtan's picture
qahtan

 

 

 Yes I would say the same as Bill. "It's the same meat but different gravy'

 Meaning same dough different shape. :-)))) qahtan

ryan_d's picture
ryan_d

Hmm, I'm going to have try that out.  The link looks quite good so I'll try it out and see how it goes.  I'm sure I'll be asking quite a few more dumb questions so bare with me but thanks for the replys!

 

-Ryan 

Wild-Yeast's picture
Wild-Yeast

Heidi, Sounds like the dough hasn't had enough gluten development. Gluten gives the dough resistance to spreading out like pancake batter during proofing and baking. Are you allowing enough time to allow the flour to fully hydrate? I ask this because it is sometimes necessary to add flour to firm up the dough. How long has the dough been kneaded? Dough has to be kneaded until the proteins (gluten) relax and then about two minutes longer. You'll feel the dough firm up and become rubbery while kneading. Let the dough rest for 15-20 minutes in the refrigerator to relax the protein before continuing the knead. Usually, I just continue to knead till it relaxes. I knead by hand which doesn't add as much heat as an electric mixer. What are you doing to form the loaf? This is an art that took me a long time to finally "get it". The idea is to stretch the outer skin of the bread so that it forms a stressed skin. This skin "contains" the internal expanding bulk so that a balloning, and hence, rising action results. It's a technique that experienced bakers do so effortlessly that you could completely miss the action despite the fact that you're carefully observing them. I've found that properly stressed skins are also easy to slash properly...,

"Where Bowers of Flowers Bloom All Day in the Sun"..., 

Wild-Yeast

Wild-Yeast's picture
Wild-Yeast

Hi Heidi,  Sounds like you're ok on the gluten. This is the part that is suspect:

"I usually roll the dough out and then roll up, pretty tightly, pinching in the ends. They rise fine...It is the braiding that was not rising properly."

I think you should braid "before" proofing.

Wild-Yeast

 

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Hi, Heidi.

The most reliable way to determine when your bread is done is to measure the internal temperature.

Buy an "instant read" thermometer. Most groceries carry them for less than $10. When you want to check your bread, stick the thermometer probe into the center of the loaf. When done, it should read 205F. Some highly enriched doughs (lots of milk, eggs, sugar, etc.) are done at 190F. Erring on the high side is better than on the low side.

If your bread is done but the crust is too light, it usually means you should be baking that bread at a higher temperature.

I hope that helps.


David