The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Help I made a stupid mistake

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Rivermute's picture
Rivermute

Help I made a stupid mistake

Bah.. Just made two Ciabatta loaves which I generally allow to rise after shaping on parchment. After baking the parchment is stuck to the bottom. This is a brand of parchment I have never used before and is the first time I have experienced parchment sticking. Any have any hints or suggestions.. I tried peeling it off as soon as the bread was out of the oven but that didn't work. Thinking about mabey melting some butter and brushing it on with the hopes of freeing up the parchment.

Doc.Dough's picture
Doc.Dough

Try turning the parchment over. I have had the same experience and I think it may be associated with having only one side of the paper coated.  I think I had to cut it away from the bread last time.

thomaschacon's picture
thomaschacon (not verified)

The solution that finally rid me of the problem was to chuck the parchment paper, including the ciabatta stuck to it, into the garbage bin. Helpful, huh? ;) (No, seriously, it's not coming off short of a bread knife.)

 

tn gabe's picture
tn gabe

I have a wire brush I use for all sorts of bread related tasks and it can work to get parchment off the loaves.

This happens to me occasionally and I'd never thought that the paper may only be coated on one side. Usually happens to me when the oven is hotter than 450 or whatever the max temp for Quillon/parchment is.

Rivermute's picture
Rivermute

This was cheapo parchment that I usally use for making steam packets... Thinking that the oven may have been a little to hot as well. I also was using a different setup to steam the oven so who knows. I ended up cutting the bottoms off and making bread pudding.

Chuck's picture
Chuck

My experience with any reasonable parchment paper coated with silicone (the most common, but not the only one) on both sides is it's insensitive to temperature within a range from well below boiling water to about 500F.

Doeyo's picture
Doeyo

Put the bread back into a 275 degree oven for a few minutes to heat the substance the parchment paper is coated with---it should peel right off once it's warm enough to melt.    Works for moi!   Good luck with it!   Doeyo

FoodFascist's picture
FoodFascist

erm--  had this problem once with cakes, what worked is to hold the whole thing, paper side down, over a boiling kettle. The steam from the kettle got the paper unstuck. BUT it probably depends what the paper is coated with as others have said.

rayel's picture
rayel

Hi rivermute, a friend of mine uses non stick aluminum foil. Only one side is non stick, the dull side, and he says it works really well. I haven't tried it with bread yet, but intend to soon. When I use parchment paper, I spray the paper with Pam, and dust the surface with corn meal or semolina. I have used non stick parchment papers for muffins, and they work with no spraying.

Ray

Chuck's picture
Chuck

When I use parchment paper, I spray the paper with Pam, and dust the surface with corn meal or semolina.

I'm extremely surprised at this, as I've never done any of these things and never had parchment paper stick.

At room temperature when making the loaves, parchment paper is only reasonably un-sticky (but not really "slick"): some kind of lubricant is practically a necessity if trying to move a loaf off one piece of parchment paper before it's baked. I once tried to proof a loaf on one piece of parchment paper then move it to a different piece for baking-it didn't work very well. My solution has been simply "don't do that".

When a loaf is baked though and the parchment paper gets hot in the oven, the coating reaches its "release temperature" after which the paper is extremely easy to remove from a finished loaf with no lubricant at all. What you need to do for removal at development time and what you need to do for removal at baking time are different...

gerhard's picture
gerhard

If you used waxed paper instead of parchment paper it will stick.  I have used parchment for years and have never experienced anything sticking to it.

 

Gerhard

AnnaInMD's picture
AnnaInMD

what a mess, we ate paper for days despite intrinsically minute clean ups with tweezers.

anna

 

rayel's picture
rayel

Do most parchment papers have a one sided release or two? I use two brands, and don't remember not using  spray. I guess I don't know what their non sprayed capabilities are.

Ray

Chuck's picture
Chuck

My experience has been entirely with two-sided. I've used several different brands over the years, largely depending on which brands my supermarket was carrying at the time. My experience has been the same with all of them: no need to spray the pieces going into the oven. (I know, there are much cheaper ways than buying it at the supermarket  ..but that's what I've done:-)

The silicone coating is "sorta" slick even at room temperature, so you can tell just by feeling what you've got. I would guess (but I don't really know) that it's actually easier to manufacture two-sided.

I'm curious: have you ever tried baking on un-sprayed parchment paper and had it stick, or have you always just gone ahead and sprayed it with oil without really knowing whether or not that was necessary?

gerhard's picture
gerhard

I have used parchment paper for 30 or so years and I have never heard of one sided parchment paper.  Waxed paper comes that way which is what made me think that waxed paper was mistaken for parchment.  We cook pizza, cookies, bread, buns, all kinds of sweet goods as well as chicken breasts on occasion and I have never treated parchment paper and have never had it stick.  Even difficult things like cheese that burn onto baking sheets come off the parchment paper without a problem.  You can also reuse parchment paper several times until it becomes so brittle that it breaks apart.  A few years ago a neighbour watched me put pizza in the oven on parchment so next time they did a frozen pizza he put it on waxed paper and it was a mess.  He asked me if it had something to do with fresh dough compared to frozen, I was kind of puzzled and then through the conversation we realized that he did not know that there was a difference between waxed paper and parchment paper.

Gerhard

rayel's picture
rayel

Chuck and Gerhard, thanks for the info. I have always sprayed or sprayed and floured, an unnecessary overkill apparently. I have done this, long before I knew about the one sided non stick alluminum foil, so I have no excuses. A new product out now offers  parchment on one side and aluminum foil on the other, don't know what it is intended for. I have  used  unsprayed parchment paper for cookies, and that worked fine.

 

Ray