The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Multigrain Boule

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Syd's picture
Syd

Multigrain Boule

Here is a boule I made last weekend that is worth sharing.  I had replenished my starter but didn't have enough bread flour on hand to make up my usual dough. I knew if I made a trip to the store, by the time I came back, my starter would be past its peak, so I just made up the difference with the flours I had on hand. 

I really liked the flavour of this loaf and it improved throughout the week.  Here is the recipe:

  • 150g starter @ 100% hydration
  • 300g water
  • 3g diastatic malt
  • 50g whole wheat
  • 25g rye
  • 25 all purpose
  • 100g semolina
  • 250g bread flour
  • 9g salt

 Whisk up starter, water and diastatic malt.  Add remaining flours in increments and mix until all the flour is hydrated.

  • autolyse 50 mins

Add salt and knead until medium gluten development.  I don't have a mixer, so I always knead by hand.  It takes about 8 to 10 minutes of quite vigorous slapping and folding. 

  • bulk ferment 2 hours with a stretch and fold at the one hour mark

Pre-shape, rest 20 mins, shape.  Allow to rise to about three quarters of its final volume, then retard in the fridge overnight or for about 8 - 12 hours.  Bake, with steam, at 230C for 10 mins, turn oven down to 200 - 210C and bake for another 40 mins.  Keep and eye on it to see that it is not over browning and turn oven down, if necessary.

Syd

Comments

lumos's picture
lumos

Really beautiful looking loaf, Syd, both crust and crumb!

Very interesting you added semolina in the formula? Is it semolina flour you used or regular semolina (grainy type) you'd use for making pudding? How did it affect to the behaviour/feel of the dough and also to the flavour/texture of the resultant bread?

 

lumos

Syd's picture
Syd

Thanks, Lumos.  It is semolina rimacinata (twice milled semolina) so it is quite fine but still grainy.  Not powdery like regular flour.  Actually, it didn't affect the feel of the dough too noticeably.  It kneaded like my regular formula (for my 'go to loaf') which is the same formula without the semolina and all-purpose.  I only added them because I had to put something in to make up the difference for the shortage of bread flour.  I think it definitely added to the flavour.  Semolina breads or breads with a significant amount of semolina in them have a special flavour which I find hard to describe, but I find the taste very appealing. 

best,

Syd

lumos's picture
lumos

Thanks, Syd!

So it's not the same as semolina with which people used to make that famously dreadful semolina pudding, then.   I went to an Italian delicatessen in London the other day to see if they have semolina flour ( semolina rimacinata), but the only one they had was more coarse, grainy one.  But one day, I'll really want to try using it.....

best wishes,

lumos

Mebake's picture
Mebake

Lovely, Syd! The bread looks beautiful inside out.  your display of the load is also unique.

 

Syd's picture
Syd

Thanks, Khalid.  I appreciate your comments and it is always great to hear from you. :)

Best,

Syd

varda's picture
varda

Your bread looks great and I like the way the formula reads.    Your scoring looks great but when, when will you photograph the whole loaf so we can get a better look?   Brevity is the soul of wit but of bread blogging?  -Varda

Syd's picture
Syd

Your scoring looks great but when, when will you photograph the whole loaf so we can get a better look?   Brevity is the soul of wit but of bread blogging?  -Varda

Full frontals are so over rated and, inevitably, quite boring.  :)

But, because you asked:

Next time I'll include a group shot of the boule, dog, cats and the whole clandamily.  Always a pleasure to hear from you, Varda.:)

Syd

varda's picture
varda

you could drape a scarf over it to maintain the mystery.   Thanks for posting.   And I love your scoring - now that I've had a chance to see it.  -Varda

Syd's picture
Syd

You're welcome, Varda.  Drape a scarf and photograph some shattered shards on the cutting board.  Now that's an idea.  :)  That's one of my standard scoring patterns but with so many slashes you have to make sure that it is slightly under proved otherwise they won't all open.  See above pic.

Syd

Floydm's picture
Floydm

Lovely, Syd.  Would you mind if I featured this one on the home page for a bit?

Syd's picture
Syd

Thanks, Floyd.  I would be honored.

Best,

Syd

GSnyde's picture
GSnyde

Really nice open crumb.  I can almost taste it.  Excellent creativity, using what you have on hand.

Glenn

Syd's picture
Syd

Thanks Glenn! :)

Syd

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

and creative with the flour use.  Nicely written.  Syd, looks like I'm late to the party...I've just been running around so lately..had to buy new washer and dryer.  Congratulations on a lovely front page display.

Sylvia

Syd's picture
Syd

Thanks, Sylvia.  If you are anything like me, then you would research washers and dryers for a month, plague the salesperson with a 1001 questions, then buy the one that looks good.  :)

Best,

Syd

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

have to tell you, I'll make it short:)  Went back next day to change to models with steam.  Got over 300 in upgraded models for 70 dollars..glad I went back for upgrades and a day of special discounts!  Hope these last as long as the last ones..20yrs..my dryer still works fine..but got the new matching set.  

lumos's picture
lumos

Yay! Your bread looks really awesome on the TFL top page! :)

Syd's picture
Syd

Thanks, Lumos. :)

Syd

ananda's picture
ananda

A great loaf Syd,

Well done on the fron page feature too

Very best wishes

Andy

Syd's picture
Syd

Thank you Andy.  I appreciate your comments. :)

All the best,

Syd

Franko's picture
Franko

Really nice to see one of your loaves on the front page Syd, and it's a beauty!

Terrific crumb and scoring, with a bold bake to maximize all the flavour from your well balanced formula. I can just imagine how good it tastes. Nice, Great baking Syd!

All the best,

Franko

Syd's picture
Syd

Thanks, Franko. Yes, the bold bake really caramelises the crust and provides maximum flavour.  It tasted really good on day three.  Always good to hear from you, Franko.

Best,

Syd

breadsong's picture
breadsong

Hi Syd,
How nice to see your beautiful boule on the front page!
Gorgeous, dark crust and a very nice combination of flours.
:^) from breadsong

Syd's picture
Syd

Thanks, breadsong! :)

All the best,

Syd

joeg214's picture
joeg214

That isn't bread...  it's a work of art!  When I grow up, I want to be just like you LOL

Joe

Syd's picture
Syd

Thanks for your kind words, Joe. :)

All the best,

Syd

jaywillie's picture
jaywillie

This recipe looked so good I decided to give it a try. I made a few minor adjustments to the flours -- more WW and rye (75g each), less semolina (50g), no AP -- and did a bulk ferment rather than after shaping (just because it's easier). I baked it last night and it looks and smells great. The past two days here were cool, so the ferment and rising took extra long. Got great oven spring, and a good looking loaf, although I had a blowout along a slash. Not a real crisp crust, so that would be something I'd work on for next time. (Did leave it in as the oven cooled; didn't seem to help.) I've had one taste, almost not enough to evaluate, but so far so good. Thanks for the recipe, Syd!

Syd's picture
Syd

You're welcome.  The cool weather and subsequent long rising would have contributed to the flavour of your loaf.  I wish I had the luxury of cool weather, but I don't so I have to rely on keeping my flours in the freezer, using chilled water, adding salt to my starter and retarding my loaves in the fridge.  This is a 71.4% hydration loaf (if you include the water in the starter) so it requires some drying out to achieve a crisp crust.  Perhaps, try and bake it for longer next time.  Just check to see that you are not over browning it or burning it. 

Best,

Syd

sfsourdoughnut's picture
sfsourdoughnut

At what internal loaf temperature do you pull the loaf from the oven please?

Thanks.

Syd's picture
Syd

I never test the internal temperature of my loaves.  Perhaps I should.  I am sure it would be quite informative.  I suppose it is because I have been baking for so long that I have gotten used to when it is done.  .  But, if you wanted to test the temperature, it should be done when it is somewhere between 205 - 210F.  I am not sure if there is any correlation between crisp crust and internal temp, though.  What I am trying to say is that it might be cooked, but still retain enough moisture  to soften the crust immediately you take it out of the oven.   In that case you need to return it to the switched-off oven and let the remaining heat dry it out for a further 5 or so minutes. 

Syd

 

jaywillie's picture
jaywillie

I tested mine, and it was 207F, which is a bit above where I was aiming (200-205F). But I basically agree with Syd, and think 200-210 is right for this loaf.

sfsourdoughnut's picture
sfsourdoughnut

Thank you.