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sautumner frangipani; diverting all power to the pies

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freerk's picture
freerk

sautumner frangipani; diverting all power to the pies

Even though summer just doesn't seem to happen this year in these parts of the world, there are some wonderful summer fruits to be enjoyed.

Being under a strict bread baking embargo right now due to an overfull freezer, it seemed best to take advantage of the local produce (and fix my weekend baking crave in one go).

Here they are: 1x full fledged "summer of your dreams" in the shape of an almond lemon torte with fresh strawberries;

And (yesterday), the dessert that's more in touch with the slightly worrying autumnal meteorological reality over here:

Almond frangipani with apples and lemon in a pain d'epices caramel sauce. The sauce, made with apple juice, brown sugar and Monin's "Pain d'Epices"-syrup, tweaked with a hint of ginger and chilipowder, was especially tasty.

It tasted pretty much like the summer of 2011: spiking bright yellow with sunny lemon and juicy almond meal, fading away to brown via the ginger and the pain d'epices, to come full circle in acidity in the apples.

Not summer anymore, but no fall yet. I call it sautumner frangipani!

Freerk

P.S. You would do me a big favor endorsing my BreadLab iniative. Every "like" will get me closer to realizing a 6 episode documentary/road movie; chasing the best bread Europe has to offer. Thanks in advance!

PaddyL's picture
PaddyL

I'm drooling!

Daisy_A's picture
Daisy_A

Mmm, those look delicious freerk - you obviously have a talent for making pastries! Good use of fresh strawberries, as promised.

We have been enjoying spiced marrow flan at the moment after a surprise gift of a giant marrow. Looks like brown sludge but tastes soo good there have been nearly been spoon fights over the final scrapings! I say nearly because gracious sharing prevailed - just!

Enjoy your lovely pies. Here's wishing for an Indian summer... Daisy

freerk's picture
freerk

Hey Daisy,

Mmm, actually "Indian Summer Frangipani" would be a good name.... Maybe if I make it with a rich nice indian summer red sauce...

Believe it or not, but the combo of words: "marrow" "spiced" and "flan" comes back with 0 results on google. I think that is the first time ever actually....

Since I am profoundly curious in nature, and a bit of a marrow lover myself, I need to ask.... Spiced marrow flan?!

Freerk

varda's picture
varda

and really beautifully presented on those lovely plates.   I am also wondering about the spiced marrow flan.   Whatever could that be?   And also, even though I watch Wallace and Grommit, I have no idea what a marrow is.  -Varda

freerk's picture
freerk

I hope we haven't heard the last of the marrow yet.

Somehow I think it's the squash, but then again (I never had the pleasure of tasting it) I díd find some recipes to make a bone marrow flan...

Somehow it's easier to picture Daisy having a spoon fight over the first (a squash) than over the latter, but then again, that is based on my presumption that Daisy is living in a greenhouse, with abundant roses in every possible color flowering around her head; a place where butterflies have the right of way at all times.

But that image might be wrong ;-) Maybe she turns out to be a growling carnivore (like me; I'm a butcher's son) after all !!!!

I know she will shed some light on this soon enough!

Freerk

Daisy_A's picture
Daisy_A

Hi freerk, hi varda,

Hope you are both well. Good to share dessert talk, stimulated by freerk's great dishes!

Loving the pictures you both draw of life in the UK and my life in particular ;-).

Varda you cracked me up when you suggested you were getting your instruction in British culture from Wallace and Gromit, until I realised they probably do have a certain type of life covered pretty well! My grandfather was from Preston, same as Nick Park and his parents. (You probably know Wallace is based on Park's father?)

Surprising that marrows don't feature, as they are one of the signature allotment vegetables. They are a squash but less varied in type than Latin American or Caribbean squashes - mostly like pumped up zucchini/courgettes but more watery. They can grow super big and so are often grown for competition. *Update* - looked this up: apparently it is in Curse of the Were-Rabbit, but they had to change it to melon for an American audience! 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/film/2005/sep/16/awardsandprizes.oscars2006  

UK allotments are obviously multicultural now so all kinds of squashes, gourds, marrows are being grown. However the type that Gromit is holding up in delight is the kind grown typically by Northern working-class gardeners and others for competition. 

This type of marrow was the one we got on our 'Night of the long vegetable swapping'. We had exchanged freshly-dug potatoes with our neighbour for some newly-picked green beans and gone to the butcher to get a nice steak to accompany them, when a lady came in and asked if we wanted a marrow: Her neighbour kept giving them to her and she couldn't get through them quickly enough. We said yes, then out of her opaque checked granny bag she drew a belter of a marrow - 1.5kg at least.

I've cooked stuffed savoury marrow before and found it tasty but watery, so decided to go for sweet instead. I thought about doing a marrow version of pumpkin pie, but the aim of a quick, fresh supper of potatoes, steak and beans left no time to cook a flan case and then the whole pie. I remembered the milk and fruit flans I had enjoyed in Hispanic and African restaurants and tried the dish in a pyrex dish, without pastry. Came out fine, although I may try it in a water bath next time: You probably have your own traditional recipes for pumpkin pie, but the one I used the one on the link below with 3/4 coffee spoon of mixed spice in place of cinnamon and nutmeg and an extra capful of natural vanilla essence. I had to drain the marrow well and found it needed cooking for longer in my oven:

http://allrecipes.co.uk/recipe/4600/homemade-pumpkin-pie.aspx

Here's how it looks without pastry: 

 

freerk - I would totally go to a spoon skirmish for bone marrow! I hear wonderful things about the bone marrow and parsley on toast at the St. John restaurants but have yet to try it. I was also brought up eating meaty treats from traditional butchers... I realise I've been posting recently on sweet things. However both P and I if given a choice, would normally go for savoury, unless the sweet were intense and quite spicy too...I have been trying out sweeter things so that I might have more options for desserts for special meals, because my range was quite limited! Looking again at your lovely frangipani dessert - that sounds just the thing! I love frangipani and the sound of the syrup and spices together with some chilli heat sounds absolutely delicious :-) 

I really like the way you plate the desserts, freerk. I think that if I were plating the flan for a special supper rather than a simple Friday night supper I would add some homemade candied fruits and ice cream...I like the way you've put the spots of coulis on the plate also. They one and only time I did a quite elaborate plate for a panna cotta with berry coulis and nougatine I did that. Took me a few goes, however, to get the blobs neat! I can see from the desserts above and from your photo album that you are skilled at dessert plating. 

Oh and I do  live in a house with a conservatory (absolutely tiny but a must-have when house-searching!), we have rose bushes - 2 - one bright cerise-pink in the main bed and one deep apricot against the terracotta wall. There have also been butterflies! However some of the garden is also a potager...because my absolute favourite plant is one that looks beautiful and is also edible...(includes roses!). Most of this is inherited from  urban Victorian Britons who wanted what they saw in the manor houses but could only produce it on a much tinier scale. Still, if I want the grander scale I go here:

http://www.cotonmanor.co.uk/

Below: Daisy's rose; butterfly on sedum at Coton Manor Gardens

Very best wishes and happy baking! Daisy

varda's picture
varda

Those nights of long vegetable swapping - who can forget those.   Thanks so much for the link which explains how marrow became melon.  I was quite confused on this point when I watched Curse of the Were Rabbit.    In fact your entire post is extremely edifying.   And your rose is beautiful.  -Varda

Daisy_A's picture
Daisy_A

Hi Varda,

Thank you for your message - glad the link was helpful!

Thanks also for your kind comment on the rose. I just remembered I forgot to list my little deep pink Gallica rose. How could i forget that? It came all the way with us from our first home and is now in a large pot, but yet to flower this year. Has a much stronger scent than the more modern roses. 

Glad you've also had some good vegetable swapping - a nice feeling, isn't it?

Wishing you happy baking, Daisy

freerk's picture
freerk

What beautiful gardens..

It makes me long for the days the purple butterfly bush in the backyard was heavy with colorful, delicately winged visitors.

I love roses. It has proven quite tricky to grow them on my balcony. After "killing" a few I gave up until further notice. When I see your pictures I'm determined to find the right variety, that will succeed in the erratic weather conditions my balcony has to offer.

Although my search for the right type of squash for the "caballo de angel" some time ago ended fruitlessly, I have more hope in finding a marrow over here. After all squash are abundant right now, so if it ís to be found around here, it must be now. And when I do, I will definitely give your flan a spin.

It seems my imagination wasn't that far off; butterflies, roses, a conservatory, that is 3 out of 3! But then again; by putting up  that link, you have seamlessly stitched yourself into my mind's eye as lady of Coton Manor! I can't help it, I can just see you gently guiding your pink "ornamental birds" away from your pink gallicas :-)

Judging by the pictures of Varda's 100% atta loaf, accompanied by a flower arrangement just as delicate as the whole atta dough, both of you have truly green fingers!

Thanks for both your compliments on my plating. I don't watch much TV but I gobble up cooking shows like a toddler the Teletubbies.

I'm having a bad case of bread baking addiction withdrawal syndrome though. Can't wait for the weekend to get my fix.

Have a good week!

Freerk

 

 

 

 

Daisy_A's picture
Daisy_A

Hi freerk, 

Thanks for your kind message. Might be worth trying rosa Gallica or a species dog rose in a pot on a balcony? You probably know they are hardier and produce multiple canes, rather than one tall bush that might fall over in the wind...Our gallica does fine in a pot. It's not a repeat flowerer but so beautiful when it does flower and the smell is gorgeous. From the balcony it might waft into the room, which might not be bad?

I'm sure the flan could be done with squash - after all I did 'rearrange' a pumpkin pie recipe...

Ah yes, 3 out of 3 ;-) It would be good to gently guide the pink birds around. I would be like Alice then :-)...In fact the local youth theatre did a great outdoor production of Alice at Coton. One of my then students was the Dormouse. He actually started off asleep in the giant teapot! Pink birds are feisty, though - I'm not sure how easily they would be led. Here's my own picture of them below: 

I also have to say that despite being very much the lady of the manor of my own small plot I could in no way usurp the real lady of Coton - the inimitable  Susie Pasley-Tyler. I also forgot to say that Coton has many Dutch visitors, with coaches coming from the Netherlands every week in summer. Although I have to say that a lot of leading British gardeners are influenced by Dutch styles also, particularly the move to more naturalistic mass planting.

I always go to see the flamingoes at Coton and the Pekin bantams scratching in the orchard. However my absolute favourite Coton bird is Rodney the macaw: Rodney, who eats coffee and walnut cake delicately with his claws like a dowager duchess, but who also lunges at people's earrings and buttons because he hopes so much that they will turn out to be nuts; Rodney who cradles in the gardeners' arms and rides on their backs like a baby but who will take a nice chunk out of any unknown person who dares to touch him; Rodney whose scores of admires stand on tiptoe under his perch begging him to speak to them, waits until they turn away disconsolately, then screeches Byeeee! Rodney is el rey of Coton. Here he is above and below is some of some of the wildlife in my garden - ladybird on micro olives besides sweet peas and phacelia!

 

Hope you can hold out for the weekend bread fix!

Very best wishes, Daisy

EvaB's picture
EvaB

my grandmother apparently made marrow preserves. My brother told me about them, I never saw a marrow, although I can probably get seeds for them here in Canada.

Peel and slice the marrow, and place in a large kettle (flat open jam kettle according to my memory) sprinkle sugar on the cubed marrow and add rasisins, and chopped candied ginger and stir to combine. Let sit over night on counter (my grandmother never had a fridge until she lived in town with my aunt) and covered with a square of muslin cloth (she used these cloths for everything from dish drying to straining milk or anything else, I buy it by the yard, and use them still) The next day you bring your marrow mixture to a slow boil on the stove stirring constantly and until the marrow goes transparent (the sugar brings out the juice in the marrow so don't add any water) and once its to the transparent stage, dip into canning jars that have been sterilized, and are hot (the hot mixture can crack a cold jar) and put on the boiled lids, tighten and then place in a boiling water bath for 10 minutes although you can skip the bath its better if you manage it. Of course you clean the jar tops before putting the lids on and make sure they seal well, when the bath is over let cool on counter and listen for the snap of the jar lids sealing (assuming you have snap lids to use) and use the preserves for whatever you like. Brian had fond memories of them on bread, the syrup should be thick not thin, but not commercial jam thick, it should spread nicely and be full of chunks of marrow, the raisins and ginger flavouring the whole mix. The marrow itself is rather bland to taste, and takes on the flavours in the mix. To sugar you simply sprinkle the sugar over the cubes in the kettle as you chop the marrow and add to the kettle, so they get a spinkle of sugar but not tons, then I think you would add a lot more sugar.

He said it was like the green tomato preserves she made, which says 1 pound of sugar to on pound of sliced green tomatoes, but they are more sour than the marrow would be, so would need more sugar.

The green tomato recipe is 8 pounds of stemmed green tomatoes, put into large kettle deep enough to hold them pour on boiling water to coverklet stand 5 mintues and pour off water. to the 8 pounds of tamatoes add 8 pounds of white sugar, 3-6 lemons (sliced thinley and washing the skins well first to remove any pestacide etc) 1-3 ounces of preserved ginger (this is not candied ginger but the stuff in the preserving sugar sauce) sliced finely, and 3 -4 cups raisins, mom always used dark raisins because that was what she could get.

slice the tomatoes in layers with sugar, lemon slices, and ginger and raisins. Let stand overnight. Drain off hte liquid and boil and skim the juice for 10 minutes (dont' think you would need to dothis with the marrow, as the juice of the green tomatoes would have solanin in to make bitter and would skin up and be skimmed off) Add the tomatoes and fruit mixture and boil untilt he tomatoes are clear (transparent and yes they do get transparent) (this is the longest stage and you do really need to have patience with it) put into sterile glass jars and seal.

These are great on pancakes or waffles, and a tasty way to preserve a heavy crop of tomatoes that won't ripen before freezing.

Daisy_A's picture
Daisy_A

Hi Eva,

Great to hear from you and thank you so much for sharing these delicious recipes. 

It would be good to try the marrow version. Also I have a lot of tomatoes on vines in my back garden at the moment and am not sure that they will all ripen before autumn. I was going to look for a green tomato chutney recipe but now I don't have to...

Thanks for sharing! 

Best wishes, Daisy

EvaB's picture
EvaB

I have never made the marrow one, but the green tomato one turns out very yummy, but you do have to use all the sugar which is a lot by reading or hearing it,but you do need it to offset the acid in the green tomaotes.

I also make a green tomato pie, which is delicious! As well as a lovely ripe tomato pie with cheese in, that's great too. The green one tastes almost like an apple pie, its sweet, the ripe one is savoury.

freerk's picture
freerk

Hey Eva!

Great stuff! I wrote a whole "epistle" about how much your post brought back memories of my mother making preserves, but it seems that I only previewed it and never saved it :-(

Nevertheless: if I manage to find the marrow over here in the Low Countries, I'll most definitely give your recipe and method a spin!

I know of green tomatoes, but 've never really tasted it (as far as I remember at least) so that will have to go on my bucket list as well!

Thank you so much for sharing!!!!

Greetz from Amsterdam.

Freerk

EvaB's picture
EvaB

ANYONE talk you into adding vinegar to the green tomatoes or the marrow, I've never tasted the marrow preserves, but my ex sil talked my brother into adding vinegar to the green tomatoes (she didn't think they were preserves unless they were pickled and insisted, although my brother had the recipe) they turned out terrible, they were salty tasting instead of sweet with a rather sickening undertone of vinegar!

And they canned quarts and quarts of them, and then she was sure it was something he had added to the recipe not what she added. She didn't believe him when he told her no vinegar, and she wouldn't until my mother wrote the preserve recipe in a letter to them. They aren't pickles!

She didn't know everything she thought she did! She was a fair cook and did a lot of canning after my brother taught her how, and also winemaking, but she wasn't really the greatest with any of it. Not that I can talk, but I at least know I can't put on a 12 course dinner with the fancy deserts etc, so don't try. I figure if the food disappears off the table then it was good. Of course the rule in the house has been for years, if you critique the food the next meal you cook! LOL

I enjoy the memories that many of the posts bring to me, of my mother, my brother and my grandmother canning or baking.

freerk's picture
freerk

Eva,

I promise you here and now to never ever put vinegar in my green tomatoes or marrow!

:-)

Freerk

EvaB's picture
EvaB

you can eat them, but they are not what they started out to be!

I do like them, and they do require a lot of cooking, so its not something to start on a moments notice, and its definitely a two day process, but you can make smaller or larger batches, depending on the size of kettle you have, but 8 pounds is about optimum for my large jam kettle, I can't remember howmany 500 or 250 ml jars it will fill, but I don't reccomend doing more than a half sized recipe to try it out, because it might not be to your taste at all.

I can't get preserved ginger here (in sugar syrup) so have to use candied ginger, its not quite the same, but it works ok. I am going to try and make some of my own preserved ginger, I think the process is very much the same as the marrow, and tomato preserves, and simply jar it in the hot syrup.

Janetcook's picture
Janetcook

Freerk,

My kids would love it if I began producing delicacies such as you have pictured above in my kitchen....I stick mainly to breads and my 'to bake' list continues to grow exponentially despite the fact that I am baking more than ever....One new formula is replaced with at least 2 new formulas to try...I really have to stop checking out the baker's blog section here....a dangerous pass time...

I, too, love the plates the tortes are pictured on.  What a heavenly design and how well it complements what is sitting on it!

Janet

freerk's picture
freerk

I know what you are saying Janet! I just bookmarked another one that just needs to be made, tested and reworked :-)

The plates are by Iittala. Great stuff but it comes at a price!

Have a great week.

Freerk