The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Rye experiment #2

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sam's picture
sam

Rye experiment #2

Hello,

This is my 2nd attempt at a high concentration rye.   I adjusted my first attempt...

I lowered the chunky-rye soaker from 50% of total "flour" to 25%, and milled the chunky rye stuff at a slightly more fine level (but it was still pretty chunky).   Also, I used whole-wheat flour instead of white flour, and increased hydrations for the soaker and the overall bread.    I did not use any baker's yeast, all naturally leavened.   I also made a larger loaf, 1000 grams vs. 775 grams previously.

This dough had more gluten development than my last attempt, but it was still not enough to form a shape-able dough ball and an actual free-standing loaf.  I had to use a pan again.   Which isn't bad, it just is.

Here's the formula I used:

    grams
Total Dough Weight  1000.00
Total Dough Hydration 75%
Total Dough Flour+Soaker Weight571.00
Total Dough Water Weight 429.00
     
Leaven:    
Rye Flour Leaven Percentage 40%
Leaven Hydration  125%
Starter Percentage  10%
Flour Weight  228.00
Water Weight  285.00
Starter Weight (125% starter) 23.00
     
Soaker:    
Chunky Rye Soaker Percentage25%
Soaker Hydration  100%
Salt Percentage  2.0%
Soaker Weight  143.00
Water Weight  143.00
Salt Weight  3.00
     
Final Mix    
Salt Percentage  2.0%
Preferment Weight   536.00
Soaker Weight  289.00
Whole Wheat Flour  200.00
Salt   8.00

 

Here is my chunky rye soaker, before soaking.    (I did not do a hot-soaker).   Milled it at a coarse level in the miller, but not as coarse as last time.

 

 

 

Here's what the final "dough" looked like after scooping into a pan, and using wet-fingers to flatten it out..   (before dusting with rye flour on the top):

 

 

I did a bulk+final ferment of 90 mins.  It might have been too long.   Not sure.    It did rip itself apart again, this time on the sides mainly, and a little on top.    So I guess that means it is defective, but I honestly don't think there was enough gluten development for it to rise in the oven without tearing.   Maybe I am wrong.

 

 

 

I wrapped it in baker's linen (couche). 

This time, I waited a full 28 hours before cutting into it, as recommended.

The crumb:

 

 

Taste:  

(For my 1st heavy Rye I did not have any whole wheat, but a little bit of white.   It was a new experience to me, I've never tasted a high concentration rye before.   I cut into that loaf only after 4 hrs, and it was good.  The next day, it smacked me over the head with Rye flavor.   Almost too much for me.   It wasn't bad, I just wasn't used to it.   Or maybe didn't pair it with a good meat or cheese at the time.)

This one -- the mix of rye + whole wheat, I like better.   When you first taste it, it is a strong combination of rye and whole-wheat -- I like the balance the whole-wheat component brings to it.   It is very elemental.   I like it.  There is also a pretty sharp sour as a finishing taste, but it also balances well with the initial strong kick of the grains.

Overall, I'm happy.   I need to get some pastrami and swiss, or something, to go with this...

My eventual goal is to find a combination of:  rye flour, whole-wheat flour, and "chunky soaker" (of both rye+whole-wheat), that maximizes the chunky soaker and rye flour, but still allowing to form an actual shape-able free standing loaf, without any white flour.   So I'll just keep experimenting.   :-).   Next up will try splitting up everything 50/50, as time permits. 

Cheers, and happy baking!

Mebake's picture
Mebake

That is a beautiful looking Rye, Gvz! Nicely done.. better dock the loaf top next time for such high Rye percentage loaves, it will improve the resultant loaf shape, and makes a more even looking top.

Best,

 

khalid

nicodvb's picture
nicodvb

Pretty typical rye bread. Soon you'll likely want more rye and less wheat, to finally join the dark side as it always happens :-)

Good baking, enjoy it!