The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Frying Dough

CJRoman's picture
CJRoman

Frying Dough

I hope this is not a stupid question but I need some feedback from someone who knows there way around an oven *and* fryer.

I have a great pretzel recipe...but living in the South...its customary to attempt to fry...EVERYTHING.

I'm really curious how pretzel dough would fry but from what I recall, when water hits hot oil it explodes (yes?). The pretzel dough is wet from the baking soda/water bath.

Am I about to burn down my house or is this worth a try?

jcking's picture
jcking

Are you thinking deep fry ie. french fries or shallow like chicken fried steak? You could start with chicken fried and work your way up. Baby steps. I think a firmer dough would be a good start, then get wetter, and or deeper. Experiment and have fun. Watch you oil temp, an oil/candy thermo should be used.

Jim

sonia101's picture
sonia101

Maybe you could try parbaking and then frying?

CJRoman's picture
CJRoman

Thanks for all the great comments everyone! Here's what I've been thinking...feedback appreciated!

Many think its the water...but I was thinking it was the baking soda. Channeling Home Economics 100 here...but I've always been told to throw baking soda on a stove grease fire because baking soda destroys the oil. So I was thinking that the baking soda on the exterior was hitting the oil...causing it to deteriorate and foam...what do you think?

I understand the idea behind the water foam but I mean...it was FOAMING! Like, bubbling over like a cauldren foaming! I suppose it could be the water...I'm just not very knowledgeable on frying...

I was going to try a coating this weekend. I figure we get our chicken sloppy wet before dredging it and frying so perhaps that will work with the pretzel. I just *really* wanted it to work without adding flour on top of flour...

The par baking may be an idea...but I'm still feeling like its that baking soda that's killing it. What do you think?

 

I'd love to experiment with both but its sooo painful to see all that oil get thrown out the door!

 

Thanks everyone!

gary.turner's picture
gary.turner

Baking soda extinguishes fires because as it is heated, it gives off CO₂, which smothers the fire. There is nothing going on that "destroys" the oil; though it is contaminated by soda and burnt residues.

As to this:

The bad news is...I destroyed a lot of oil...

The oil foamed almost uncontrollably.

I don't know what you mean by "destroyed". Please elaborate.

As to the uncontrollably foaming oil, I don't know your familiarity with fry cooking, and how much sizzle and popping you expect, but I'd suggest your oil may be too hot. Try reducing the flame until the oil/dough merely sizzles instead of roiling and popping. At least that's the temp I use to fry hot water cornbread (I think damnyankees call a similar bread journey or johnny cakes), and donuts; the cornbread in shallow grease, and the donuts deep fried. My donuts are made with biscuit dough, which has both baking soda and baking powder, so I doubt that is the issue. Try reducing the temp. Save the boiling oil for your fish fry, and for repelling invaders scaling the walls. ;p

cheers,

gary

sonia101's picture
sonia101

I fry my doughnuts all the time and never have a problem with foam, so my money is on the baking soda being the problem.

My doughnut recipe, so you can compare ingredients

2 (1/4 ounce) packages yeast
1/4 cup warm water
1 1/2 cups lukewarm milk (scalded, then cooled)
1/2 cup sugar
1 teaspoon salt
2 eggs
1/3 cup Butter
5 cups all-purpose flour

 

 

I'm comfortable deep frying, I'll play around next time I make pretzels.

sonia101's picture
sonia101
gary.turner's picture
gary.turner

Ah, thanks for the link. That reinforces my sense that the OP's temp was too high. 350°F is a medium/low temp for frying.

cheers,

gary