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Artisan Bread Every Day - Errata for Bagel Recipe

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breadman_nz's picture
breadman_nz

Artisan Bread Every Day - Errata for Bagel Recipe

I have just bought Peter Reinhart's ABED and made the bagel recipe (which turned out fantastically well, by the way).


However there is an error in the recipe (pages 75 & 77, first edition). The correct volume of water for the poaching liquid is 1814-2721g, which is the equivalent of 64-96oz. The book says 181g-272g, being out by a factor of 10!


I couldn't find this errata notified after searching here and elsewhere, so trust it's not a duplication.

TastefulLee's picture
TastefulLee

So glad your bagels turned out well. I made the same recipe and they rose so beautifully until I boiled and baked them. They were flat and unevenly browned. Very discouraging indeed. I guess now I can't blame it on the recipe though...lol. Anyway would an error in the amount of boiling water really matter? Just curious...

breadman_nz's picture
breadman_nz

I doubt that less water would result in that. I assume you used more than was called for, which is pretty obviously not enough, since it's only a cup's worth of poaching liquid!

What you describe sounds like the bagels have overprooved. This has happened to me a couple of times. A few suggestions to avoid this:

1) Use slightly less yeast.

2) Boil them slightly earlier, when they're only just floating in your test bowl of cold water.

3) Boil them for a shorter period, say 10-20 seconds each side, as opposed to the 30-45 seconds called for in ABED.

TastefulLee's picture
TastefulLee

I have made the delicious bagels from the Artisan Breads Every Day twice more now with smashing success. Although the recipe states that the bagels should rest at room temp for 60-90 minutes after the overnight rise, for some reason mine pass the float test right out of the fridge, so the advice I  received here after my first dejected post was indeed correct (thank you breadman_nz). I discovered this on the 2nd attempt and they baked up gorgeously. I also incorporate the use of steam although the original recipe does not include it. My family is delighted and I can truly say these bagels I am making rival those at our favorite shop where I'm shelling out almost $10 per dozen -I should note also that I live in NY. I am so pleased and although I have no idea how to post pics from my phone here I just had to share. :-)

breadman_nz's picture
breadman_nz

Good to read of your progress!

I have transferred to using the Hamelman bagel formula from "Bread". It's a very similar formula to Reinhart's in ABED, but the method is slightly different - and in my opinion easier and works just as well, if not slightly better.

The similarity is the formula, and the overnight proof (Hamelman shapes his Bagel's before they rest an hour on the bench prior to fridge retardation). The biggest difference is that Hamelman advises boiling the bagels straight from the fridge - no float test. This is reasonable, since the bagels will float after a few seconds in the hot water anyway, and pretty much assures they don't overproove. He boils for 45 seconds in total, and doesn't use baking soda or salt in the poaching liquid.

To further prevent overprooving (in case you're not super speedy), he also advocates dumping the just-boiled bagels into an ice bath for a few minutes. Then it's on to the burlap-coated bagel boards, top-side down, and into a 450F (or is it 500? - I can't recall right now) oven for 3-4 minutes before flipping the bagels off the board onto the stone for another 10-12 minutes. OK - so the boards and flip are a little more finnicky than the ABED method - but I am very, very pleased with the colour, shape and texture of the finished results. It has now become my default bagel.

Worth giving a go to see which method(s) you prefer!

TastefulLee's picture
TastefulLee

I'm glad to hear of other ways to do and to improve things although I have to admit Hamelman's method seems more advanced than I am ready for. Baking with my current oven is a constant struggle - inconsistent temperature and several hot and not-so-hot spots make each baking experience an adventure :-) I usually succeed on the second or third try with any recipe due to adjustments I have to make to compensate. Although I I see where the flip would be beneficial in improving both color and shape, I worry about the board for two reasons: first, if I open the oven long enough to flip the bagels I fear the temperature won't recover and also I worry my toppings will burn. I'm actually baking on sheet pans lined with parchment (I can't seem to find unglazed tiles where I live so I only have one small circular baking stone) and I'm getting remarkable results in terms of crust which I was indeed pleasantly surprised by. I've never even seen a bagel board before but it interests me greatly. Perhaps I will do some research and plan on giving this challenge a try when my oven situation improves. 

Thanks for your help, your encouragement and for sharing your experience and suggestions! Lisa

TastefulLee's picture
TastefulLee

I'm glad to hear of other ways to do and to improve things although I have to admit Hamelman's method seems more advanced than I am ready for. Baking with my current oven is a constant struggle - inconsistent temperature and several hot and not-so-hot spots make each baking experience an adventure :-) I usually succeed on the second or third try with any recipe due to adjustments I have to make to compensate. Although I I see where the flip would be beneficial in improving both color and shape, I worry about the board for two reasons: first, if I open the oven long enough to flip the bagels I fear the temperature won't recover and also I worry my toppings will burn. I'm actually baking on sheet pans lined with parchment (I can't seem to find unglazed tiles where I live so I only have one small circular baking stone) and I'm getting remarkable results in terms of crust which I was indeed pleasantly surprised by. I've never even seen a bagel board before but it interests me greatly. Perhaps I will do some research and plan on giving this challenge a try when my oven situation improves. 

Thanks for your help, your encouragement and for sharing your experience and suggestions! Lisa

breadman_nz's picture
breadman_nz

Bagel boards are pretty easy, and quite fun - and importantly DO add to the overall bagel quality (rounder, more evenly cooked).

I thought they'd be tricky, but you can make a couple very easily. Grab a piece of redwood (is best - I had to use untreated pine). Untreated wood is important, so you don't have toxins. It's what the old school guys used to make bagels. The size I used (based on various recommendations) was 14" long x 5" wide x 1" thick. This will insert into a standard home oven and is long and wide enough for three 4oz bagels. Pick up some jute (=burlap sack material) from your local fabric store and screw it to the boards (a single layer is fine). Or you can be lazy and purchase the whole board, either in wood or aluminium, online.

To see how simple they are to use, I recommend the following video:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=AjqSPXLmJkk

 

... and yes, of course you can make great bagels on the sheet pan and baking paper. That's what I was using until a few weeks ago!