The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

baglels fell

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mpiasec's picture
mpiasec

baglels fell

made bagels this am according to Breadsecrets .com receipe, when bagels came out of the water they were fine, but when baked they didn't have any oven spring.   What causes this to happen?  Any suggestions

LindyD's picture
LindyD

I looked at Breadsecrets.com (which seems quite secretive as I could find no information about who runs it) and saw it uses Peter Reinhart's bagel formula.


Traditionally, bagels are made with high-gluten flour, salt, yeast, a bit of diastatic malt, and water. Mixed, fermented for about an hour, then shaped and refrigerated overnight, they are boiled the next day in water laced with barley malt syrup.  Baking (at 500F) takes place right after boiling.  They really don't have "oven spring" per se, but should have some rise.


Do you have any photos of your outcome?

mpiasec's picture
mpiasec

the bagle just flating out  no puff

LindyD's picture
LindyD

I took another look at that "adaptation" of the Reinhart formula. If you followed the breadsecrets recommendation of boiling each side of the bagel for two minutes, well, that means the bagels are boiled for a total of four minutes.  Water boils at 212F.  Yeast dies at 140F.  There's nothing left to puff.


My suggestion is that you visit your local library and try the bagel formula in Bread.  It is simple and elegant.

azelia's picture
azelia

thanks LindyD I think now I know why a trial of my bagels didn't rise, the receipe said to boil them for too long...and they don't need it really do they? Just so you see it puff up?

Peter Reinhart's picture
Peter Reinhart

When this happens (flattening)  it usually means the bagels over-proofed in the fridge, maybe because they didn't cool down enough, or on the counter while waiting to go into the water. The key is to boil them as soon as they pass the float test (in a small bowl of cool water). If they pop up within 15 seconds, boil them. If they are really puffy when they come out of the fridge they will probably flatten, but if you catch them just at the beginning of the float stage then they should hold shape. Yes, bagel shops use high gluten flour and non-diastatic malt syrup (and you can too), but if you use regular bread flour and make the dough stiff, as directed, they will be as good or better than any bagel shop. Probably the single biggest cause of flattening is making the dough too soft--this dough has to be stiffer than regular bread dough--pliable but still firm, satiny to the touch, not tacky.


   I hope this helps. Shoot me an e-mail at peter@pizzaquest.com if it doesn't solve the problem and we'll keep troublesooting it, but it's usually an easy tweak. (the other option, if over-proofing in the fridge is a persistent problem, is to cut back on the yeast by about 10%-15%, but the usual culprit is that the dough isn't stiff enough).