The Fresh Loaf

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Spelt Muffins - any fruit

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mountaindog's picture
mountaindog

Spelt Muffins - any fruit

I posted this somewhere here a long time back, but thought I'd post again to make it easier to find. I'll try to remember to get some photos next time I make them before they get all eaten! I may try to make these into a sourdough recipe like JMonkey did here in order to use up excess starter...I'll report on that when I do, but for now, these just use baking powder.

This is a recipe I developed about 2 years ago that people seem to love. I make it with whole organic spelt flour as I like the nutty taste of spelt - an ancient form of wheat that has very little gluten, so it's not as good for rustic breads but great in quick breads. You can also use whole wheat flour equally well but may need to adjust amounts depending on humidity. I added the whole brown flaxseeds for roughage, texture, and hopefully some health benefits, although the most benefit is derived from raw ground flax.

What I like about this recipe is it does not contain dairy - which I am allergic to (although it does have eggs so it's not vegan). It is also a little less sweet by using dark brown sugar rather than white, and is not too spicy as I omit nutmeg or clove, opting for the combo of cinnamon and ginger instead. I also make this same basic recipe with bananas or frozen blueberries or chopped apple rather than pumpkin and all come out equally great. If you like a sweeter muffin, add more brown sugar. Obviously, this can be made in a loaf pan as well as in muffin tins, but adjust baking time and temp. accordingly:

Spelt Flaxseed Muffins

 

Ingredients (makes 12 large muffins or 24 small muffins): 

Wet:

4 Large Eggs

1 c. Vegetable Oil (Sunflower, Safflower, or Canola)

1 c. Dark Brown Sugar (maple syrup also tastes great as a sub but need a little more)

2 tsp. Vanilla

1 c. Whole Flax Seeds 

Fruit of choice:           

For Blueberry Muffins: 2 c. frozen or fresh blueberries           

For Pumpkin Muffins: 2 c. canned pureed 100% pumpkin           

For Banana Muffins: 3-5 overripe bananas, depending on size (I usually freeze them once they get too ripe so I always have some on hand)           

For Apple Muffins: 4 apples, cored, peeled, and chopped into small pieces 

Dry:

3 c. Whole Spelt Flour (or substitute mixture of 2.5 c. whole wheat and unbleached white flours, if no spelt available. Wheat flours are drier than spelt, so use less or mixture will be too stiff, resulting in dense, heavy, “hockey puck” muffins).

1.5 tbsp. Baking Powder

1 tsp. Salt

2 tsp. Ground Cinnamon

1 tsp. Ground Ginger 

Directions:

1) In a large bowl, beat the eggs, then mix in the remaining wet ingredients, then mix in your fruit of choice and the flaxseeds.

2) In a separate bowl, mix together all of the dry ingredients.

3) Pour the dry ingredients into the wet, and stir. If batter comes out too dry, depending on humidity levels, flour type, or fruit size, then add about 1/8 cup of water or fruit juice. Finished batter should be stiff enough to spoon into muffin tins without it dripping all over, but not so stiff that the batter forms peaks.

4) Grease 12 large muffin cups (or 24 small muffin cups) with canola oil-type cooking spray.

5) Divide the batter up into the cups with a ladle or large spoon and rubber spatula.

6) Bake at 350 degrees F for 40-50 minutes for large muffins, or around 30 minutes for small muffins. Tap on top for doneness -  they should be firm and crusty, not too soft or mushy.

7) When done, flip muffins out of pans onto cooling rack and let cool.

8) Use within a day or two, or refrigerate in plastic bags for up to 10 days or so. Freeze the rest for up to 6 months. Just reheat in a toaster oven and enjoy!

Comments

helend's picture
helend

Thanks for the muffin recipe, Mountaindog - very tasty!

I so agree about the warm, nutty flavour of wholemeal spelt and all my breads, cakes and pastries are made with either wholemeal or white spelt as I can't tolerate modern wheat gluten or proteins.  

Don't give up on the spelt flour for yeasted or sourdough breads - it DOES have a good gluten content BUT it is more "fragile" therefore needs slightly less liquid and lighter handling - it is perfect for the folding technique and long slow rise of many rustic breads and Peter Reinhart style techniques.  If you actually like kneading (and I do -strange I know) then spelt kneads up in about half the time of modern wheat.  I will always share recipes - see any of my posts! :)

mountaindog's picture
mountaindog

Thanks for your comments Helend! I agree about the taste of spelt. I have tried to use it in a miche recipe but it did not turn out too well, but I do not necessarlily blame that on the spelt - I think it was my technique with that, and will definitley try it again for a hearth bread - maybe I'll try the no-knead recipe with a variation of spelt and sourdough, I'll report on that when I do.

 

I have read some of your posts dating from back before I joined this forum, by the way, and I am very impressed with your harvest photo contest picture - that polenta cake looks wonderful, and your orchard produce, chutneys, and preserves are beautiful! Is the polenta cake recipe here somewhere?

jane's picture
jane

I bake some this afternoon and I really like the muffins.

Thanks

Jane