The Fresh Loaf

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Tartine Basic Country Bread as Bâtards

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dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Tartine Basic Country Bread as Bâtards


 


Chad Robertson's Basic Country Bread from “Tartine Bread” has been a hit among TFL members, and with good reason. It's a wonderful bread, and Robertson's description of how to make it is clear and detailed. He not only describes what to do but also why. He provides variations on his procedures in recognition of the realities of the home baker's scheduling issues and describes their effects on the end product.


Robertson recommended a baking procedure that replicates the result of baking in a commercial gas oven for the home baker. His procedure utilizes a cast iron covered Dutch oven. This particular equipment dictates that the loaves be shaped as boules.


I have made Robertson's Basic Country Bread once before and found it delicious. Its most amazing virtue, to me, is how long it stays moist. I made 2 boules before. However, at the bakery, Robertson shapes this bread as bâtards.


Today, I made the Basic Country Bread as bâtards. They were proofed on a linen couche. The oven was steamed using the SFBI method I've described in another entry(Oven steaming using the SFBI method.). I baked, as prescribed by Robertson, at 450ºF but switched to a dry oven at 15 minutes and baked for a total of 35 minutes.




The crust was very firm initially and sang softly while cooling. It softened with cooling. The crumb was very open – as pictured in “Tartine Bread.” The aroma was very wheaty, and the flavor was very nice, with mild sourdough tang.


This is a bread I'll be making again, no doubt with variations in flour mix and steaming methods. I would like to get a bread whose crust stays crisp longer.


David


 

Comments

Postal Grunt's picture
Postal Grunt

is sure to sell a few more copies of the book.

MadAboutB8's picture
MadAboutB8

I promised myself not to buy any more bread books until I've finished with Hamelman's Bread book. Now, looking at all these fantastic results from TFL members, I'm gonna have to break my own promise.


Your bread looks great. The crumb is so beautiful. You're truly a master. Thanks for sharing.


Sue


http://youcandoitathome.blogspot.com/


 

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

This is not just a book of bread recipes. Actually, it is even more about dishes to make with bread - salads, soups, sandwiches, and more.


Hamelman segregates the scientific and technical information in the introductory chapters and introductions to each chapter. Robertson includes this sort of material as digressions within his baking instructions, where they are most relevant. I'm not saying one approach is better, but they are radically different from each other.


I find Hamelman a more useful reference work but Robertson better reading and more attuned to the home baker.


David

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

Wow!  I just love the crumb shot, fabulous!


Sylvia

arlo's picture
arlo

That's it, stopping by the bookstore on the way home from working at the bakery this morning and picking up this book!


Can only be teased for so long...

Mebake's picture
Mebake

Yummy, David! crust and crumb are fabulous! mind telling us what flour percentages have you used?


 

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Hi, Khalid.


The levain is 100% hydration, 50/50 AP and WW. The final dough is 90/10 AP/WW.


David

Franko's picture
Franko

David,


TxFarmer sold me on finally ordering the book the night before last, and now with your endorsement and a bake from it , I'm convinced it will turn out to be a wise purchase. Thanks!


Franko

Vogel's picture
Vogel

Very beautiful bâtards! You really made me want to buy the book. This is what I don't like about a lot of books. You follow the instructions, but then you don't really know why your own result just doesn't want to look like the one pictured in the book. Seems to be different with "Tartine Bread" from what I have read here so far.

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

David

GSnyde's picture
GSnyde

Nice crusty batard.  Beautiful crumb.  I look forward to thumbing through your copy of the book in a few weeks.


Glenn

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

I bet you used to sneak into your big brothers stuff, or maybe inherit some of his goodies!  I think you'll have to order your own copy, eventually ;)


Sylvia

rayel's picture
rayel

Great breads David, and through your link, I checked out your Oct 10 breads, that I had previously missed. They were also perfect. I am anxious to see the book and finally answer some questions I have about the short video. Ray

wally's picture
wally

Those are worth baking for that alone.  Delicious looking bâtards.


Larry

belfiore's picture
belfiore

...twist my arm...I'm ordering the book! I was looking at Tartine online last night trying to decide if I should move it to the top of my list. Good thing I bookmarked it.


Great looking bread David, as usual. Thank you for taking the time to share your experience with us...it's very encouraging to see the results you are able to achieve at home.


Cheers,


Toni

txfarmer's picture
txfarmer

A beautiful bake! :)

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

I definitely prefer this bread as a bâtard. I am happy with the crumb structure and flavor. I need to work on the crust, I think.


I tasted the bread still warm, as Robertson says he likes it. I had it as toast for breakfast and un-toasted for lunch and dinner. I think the crumb texture and flavor have improved. The crumb has become less chewy and more tender, and the flavor is both sweeter and more sour. 


Interesting.


David

rayel's picture
rayel

Hi David, a bit off topic, but one of my boards came apart at one of the joined segments, and I am not going to try to salvage it. I am getting ready to shop for a replacement board, and am wondering what your thoughts are concerning your bamboo board? Thanks Ray

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

I love the looks of the bamboo boards, however I find they scratch easily when I cut on them. I don't use it as a cutting board, but it's really nice to use for serving cheese with bread sliced elsewhere.


The cutting boards that I use almost exclusively are these:


http://www.surlatable.com/product/epicurean+cutting+surfaces.do?keyword=cutting+boards&sortby=ourPicks


They come in various sizes - we have 3 - and they wash extremely easily.


David

rayel's picture
rayel

Thanks David for your reply and link. I think the natural fiber composite boards are the way to go. I was looking at them today. I have a couple of smaller bamboo boards, one I use constantly. It takes quite a beating and holds up well. The cherry board that came apart, (durring an acorn squash battle) was close to 40 years old. The reverse side had a shallow well around it and I'll need to replace it, as it was a workhorse. The bamboo I agree is a pretty surface, yours looks to be a particularly well made one. Thanks again David you've given me some ideas.  Ray